Atotheb
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Hi, Ive just been given the grades abb for my ucas, however I've always wanted to law at university. The best ones I can get into are ones which are outside the top twenty/thirty. I just want to know is it worth going to, for example, hull, Swansea etc . If i go to these am I likely to get into good law schools if I get a 2:1/ first, or am I better going to a higher uni to do something else. Many thanks
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jimbomanny
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(Original post by Atotheb)
Hi, Ive just been given the grades abb for my ucas, however I've always wanted to law at university. The best ones I can get into are ones which are outside the top twenty/thirty. I just want to know is it worth going to, for example, hull, Swansea etc . If i go to these am I likely to get into good law schools if I get a 2:1/ first, or am I better going to a higher uni to do something else. Many thanks
Hi,

Firstly, I don't quite understand what you mean by 'am I likely to get into good law schools if I get a 2.1/first' in law?

If you are studying law at Swansea or Hull as you have mentioned, this IS your law school. If you want to practice law after your three year LLB then you are required either to study for the LPC for a year if you want to become a solicitor or the BPTC if you want to become a barrister, these courses are pretty similar across the board and only a few specialised schools offer them, all of which you will get a place at if you get a 2.1 in law from any university.

My advice would be to study another subject at a top tier university. You can get into plenty of Russell Group universities doing a number of subjects with the grades that you have.

Once you graduate, if you are still decided upon a career in law you can do the GDL (the law conversion course), a one year course, that if you successfully complete will then lead to either the LPC or BPTC.

Having attended interviews at law firms, I got the impression that they prefer a general degree from a top class university, combined with the GDL, than a law degree from an average university. The legal job market is extremely competitive and you will be competing with law applicants from Oxbridge and other top unis, having a good degree from a top class uni combined with good GDL results will serve you much better than a law degree from an average uni.

Good luck!
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by jimbomanny)
Hi,

Firstly, I don't quite understand what you mean by 'am I likely to get into good law schools if I get a 2.1/first' in law?

If you are studying law at Swansea or Hull as you have mentioned, this IS your law school. If you want to practice law after your three year LLB then you are required either to study for the LPC for a year if you want to become a solicitor or the BPTC if you want to become a barrister, these courses are pretty similar across the board and only a few specialised schools offer them, all of which you will get a place at if you get a 2.1 in law from any university.

My advice would be to study another subject at a top tier university. You can get into plenty of Russell Group universities doing a number of subjects with the grades that you have.

Once you graduate, if you are still decided upon a career in law you can do the GDL (the law conversion course), a one year course, that if you successfully complete will then lead to either the LPC or BPTC.

Having attended interviews at law firms, I got the impression that they prefer a general degree from a top class university, combined with the GDL, than a law degree from an average university. The legal job market is extremely competitive and you will be competing with law applicants from Oxbridge and other top unis, having a good degree from a top class uni combined with good GDL results will serve you much better than a law degree from an average uni.

Good luck!

This is something where reasonable opinions may differ.

I would say the OP should do the law degree. The reasons are these.

Slightly over 70% of trainee solicitors have done a law degree. That is often not the impression gained at City firms and it is probable that their percentage of non-law graduates is higher than in the profession generally.

Outside of the City, it is normal to self-fund the LPC and, if needed, the GDL. Only a minority of trainees will have those courses paid for. Therefore if the OP does a non-law degree there is the likelihood of having to fund an extra year.

With ABB A levels the OP is not going to be challenging for general arts courses at the most competitive universities. He might get somewhere a few places higher up a subject league table than he would for law , but nothing that would make a noticeable difference to a legal or non-legal job application.

Moreover, most City firms offering a training contracts are filtering on A levels and the OP is at or just below their minimum requirements. The chances of such a training contract are not good and so it is likely that if he gets a training contract, the OP will be self-funding.

The OP mentions Swansea and Hull. The OP should also be looking at Liverpool and Aber, Northumbria (particularly the 4 year exempting degree), Brookes and Trent.
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Dandyflower
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My opinion is that you shouldn't do law if you can get to a better uni, but I agree with nulli in this case because you're not competitive for City firms. That said, I know people with ABB who managed to get into good unis with no mitigating circumstances to then get training contracts at Silver and Magic Circle firms (okay, just 3 people); many firms auto filter, but some don't. The point he made about going to a uni a few places higher up the tables is a fair one.

I think Liverpool, Aber are solid unis, maybe Swansea too. Hull supposedly has a very good law department and a good record of producing strong people, although the general rep of the place isn't good. Northumbria has a better rep in the north, the four year does save you money if you're cert you want to practice.

My advice hinges on the assumption you can't get into Bristol/Durham/solid London uni etc - because I don't know the grade requirements for other courses. It also hinges on what nulli suggested: if you don't make it at a City or national law firm, would you really want to work in the regions in a high street firm or something. It's dull and there's no money in it.

Also be careful of law. It is very, very dry. Most students doing other courses had a much, much better time at uni. I would consider a politics degree, if you like politics. Or a history degree. Or an anthropology degree if you're interested in people.
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Use Err Name
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ABB is such an awkward position for a Law applicant. I say this because really it's only one grade below what the decent unis for law ask for (e.g. Kent, Sussex, Surrey, UEA etc). IF the OP has a strong PS and reference, I see no reason why he couldn't apply to these unis and get offers. Of course it's risky but if Law is a subject that the OP really wants to study then it's worth it and could have a big payoff. Of course, if the OP would rather just work in the legal field and isn't too fussed over actually studying it, then a degree from a Russel Group uni would probably be easier to get than Law at a, say group 1994 uni, and more useful than law at one of those dodgy "Oxford but not quite Oxford" uni's (e.g. oxford brookes, nottingham trent, south solent etc).
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Lawyer-92
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
This is something where reasonable opinions may differ.

I would say the OP should do the law degree. The reasons are these.

Slightly over 70% of trainee solicitors have done a law degree. That is often not the impression gained at City firms and it is probable that their percentage of non-law graduates is higher than in the profession generally.

Outside of the City, it is normal to self-fund the LPC and, if needed, the GDL. Only a minority of trainees will have those courses paid for. Therefore if the OP does a non-law degree there is the likelihood of having to fund an extra year.

With ABB A levels the OP is not going to be challenging for general arts courses at the most competitive universities. He might get somewhere a few places higher up a subject league table than he would for law , but nothing that would make a noticeable difference to a legal or non-legal job application.

Moreover, most City firms offering a training contracts are filtering on A levels and the OP is at or just below their minimum requirements. The chances of such a training contract are not good and so it is likely that if he gets a training contract, the OP will be self-funding.

The OP mentions Swansea and Hull. The OP should also be looking at Liverpool and Aber, Northumbria (particularly the 4 year exempting degree), Brookes and Trent.
Agree with all this, apart from a few bits of the last part.

IMO Sussex would be the best option. Although they originally ask for AAB, they had clearing vacancies for the start of the 2012 term, where they dropped the requirements to ABB. Also, although Kent asks for AAB, they happen to be lenient when it comes to making offers and accepting those who narrowly miss them (usually by one grade). I agree with you that Oxford Brookes, Liverpool and Aberdeen would make good choices, but the OP should want to try to get in Kent or Sussex with ABB.
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Atotheb
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Thanks for all advice. I've looked at all my options and I think the best unis to go to would be Liverpool/oxb/Kent. Im thinking about sending off my ucas tomorrow, but I could still go to high unis (Glasgow etc) to do English abb. any advice on which way to go would be great help
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toetothunder
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(Original post by Atotheb)
Thanks for all advice. I've looked at all my options and I think the best unis to go to would be Liverpool/oxb/Kent. Im thinking about sending off my ucas tomorrow, but I could still go to high unis (Glasgow etc) to do English abb. any advice on which way to go would be great help
How did it all go in the end? I'm in year 12 and also looking to study law. I get the feeling that I may also be in a similar situation as you come resulys day
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ORW
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I agree with most of the above posts, but you would definitely be better trying to get into a RG uni even if that means not doing Law. Law is a snobby profession, and where you study your degree matters a lot, no matter what people try to say about diversity becoming more prominent. Firms such as Norton Rose Fulbright, Linklaters and Hogan Lovells have student campus ambassadors; and only have them at Oxbridge and Russell Group unis as below

Norton Rose Fulbright; Bristol, Cambridge, Durham, Exeter, KCL, LSE, Manchester, Nottingham, Sheffield, UCL

Linklaters; Birmingham, Bristol, Cambridge, Durham, Edinburgh, Exeter, KCL, Leeds, LSE, Manchester, Nottingham, Oxford, Queen Mary University, Queen's University Belfast, Sheffield, Trinity College Dublin (non RG but a prestigious institution and Ireland's Oxbridge equivalent), UCL, Warwick, York

Hogan Lovells; Birmingham, Bristol, Cambridge, Durham, KCL, LSE, Manchester, Nottingham, Oxford, UCL, Warwick, York

This is all on the campus ambassador pages of each of these firms websites.

They are elitist, that is how the profession is in terms of where you were educated. Hull and Swansea would not cut it to get into a city firm, but would do for a high street/small national/small regional. Sounds harsh and derogative but Law is up there with the hardest professions to enter so do your best to get into a RG. With ABB the filters would hamper you from a lot of city firms, but not all. I am not sure of which city firms specifically do not filter. Also as mentioned by others, high street law etc has no money in it. Yes your focus for becoming a lawyer should not be money, but you do need to be on a decent enough one to provide for yourself and possibly a family.
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