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Grammar Schools watch

  • View Poll Results: Do you support the existence of Grammar schools?
    Yay
    299
    81.03%
    Nay
    70
    18.97%

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    (Original post by yawn)
    btw; LH - do you have fond memories too, about the many, many such threads that have argued and 'laboured' over the self-same discussion in the last 3 or so years?
    I certainly do, that's why I'm trying not to get too involved in this one

    My views have changed a bit if I'm honest, but I don't have time to go into that now
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    (Original post by LH)
    It wasn't much of a choice for me - it was either go to the grammar I had a place at or go to a god-awful school in Burnley (the schools in Burnley were so bad (well, bar two) that they've ALL been abolished now). The reason I couldn't go to one of the "good" Burnley schools? They gave priority to kids with a sibling already at the school - not much chance for an only-child like me. That doesn't strike me as very "fair" either.
    You did have extra tuiton to pass the 11+ though, if my memory serves me right, by way of a private primary school - your parents specifically paid for the results, didn't they?
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    (Original post by yawn)
    You did have extra tuiton to pass the 11+ though, if my memory serves me right, by way of a private primary school - your parents specifically paid for the results, didn't they?
    I went to a convent school run by nuns. It cost about £300 a year and the teaching was hardly top-notch. My parents didn't choose it because it was great or because they wanted me to be coached, they chose it because my Mum wanted me to have a Catholic education. The idea of applying to the grammar didn't occur to them until when I was about 9 and my Dad talked to someone at the council who basically said "don't go to a Burnley school if you can at all help it".
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    Oh, and I recieved much less "coaching" than my mates who went to one if the local state primaries.
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    (Original post by amywalters)
    Well then where is this research?

    And, I don't think that looking words up in a thesaurus will make you look any more intellectual than me, my friend...

    And how can you say that if you asked everyone on TSR, then the poll results would be different? Surely, if what you are saying is true, then the people who are against Grammar schools would willingly post on here, more so than people who are for them, because you have more reason to prove your point as they still exist. So technically, the polls there for a representative sample, and more than likely to be correct. So even if i have been lacking in my argument. There are a significantly larger amount of people who are for grammar, then against - cant argue fairer than that!
    Silly girl!

    Most people are not interested in advancing the cause of selective education apart from those who have a vested interest in it, or those who are vehemently opposed because of all the reasons argued in this thread.

    You'll have to wait for the research, since I don't have it at my fingertips at present pluse I also want you to commit yourself fully to the argument that selective education is best for the brightest.
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    (Original post by LH)
    I went to a convent school run by nuns. It cost about £300 a year and the teaching was hardly top-notch. My parents didn't choose it because it was great or because they wanted me to be coached, they chose it because my Mum wanted me to have a Catholic education. The idea of applying to the grammar didn't occur to them until when I was about 9 and my Dad talked to someone at the council who basically said "don't go to a Burnley school if you can at all help it".
    You are not Catholic though, are you? And why was she not so enthused when it came to secondary education, since you don't go to a Catholic secondary?
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    (Original post by yawn)
    You are saying that 'tongue in cheek' aren't you, TAiB?

    If not, I fear for you.
    I'll give you one guess.
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    (Original post by yawn)
    Silly girl!

    Most people are not interested in advancing the cause of selective education apart from those who have a vested interest in it, or those who are vehemently opposed because of all the reasons argued in this thread.

    You'll have to wait for the research, since I don't have it at my fingertips at present pluse I also want you to commit yourself fully to the argument that selective education is best for the brightest.
    Okay - but i dont have the time im afraid, terribly sorry that you cant have me on your team, such a loss.
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    (Original post by yawn)
    You are not Catholic though, are you? And why was she not so enthused when it came to secondary education, since you don't go to a Catholic secondary?
    Technically I am a Catholic, I even have an Irish aunt to prove it. The Catholic boys secondary in Burnley was not the kind of place you wanted to go if you could help it, plus by this time my Mum had abandoned religion somewhat for one reason or another.
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    (Original post by LH)
    I certainly do, that's why I'm trying not to get too involved in this one

    My views have changed a bit if I'm honest, but I don't have time to go into that now
    That's interesting, especially since you were one of the greatest defenders of selective education.

    Still - I won't pressure you into telling me why, just to add credence to my view.
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    (Original post by The Ace is Back)
    I'll give you one guess.
    I think I know the answer to that one, TAiB!
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    (Original post by yawn)
    Silly girl!

    Most people are not interested in advancing the cause of selective education apart from those who have a vested interest in it, or those who are vehemently opposed because of all the reasons argued in this thread.
    And the flipside of that, which you conveniently overlook, is that most people are not interested in advancing the cause of non-selective education apart from those who have a vested interest in it - i.e. those who were/are less capable, and those who did not enjoy the experience. Which, happily for you, turns out to be a majority of the population. Safety in numbers, as they say.
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    (Original post by amywalters)
    Okay - but i dont have the time im afraid, terribly sorry that you cant have me on your team, such a loss.
    For you obviously. I wouldn't want someone on my team who is not articulate, persuasive and intelligent enough to appreciate who is winning the debate!

    Only joking - I'm sure you are a nice person behind it all, albeit misguided.
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    i am the best at maths in my grammar school (although admittedly it is in the bottom 20% of grammar schools in the country)... if i went to one of the 7 or 8 comprehensives in my local area (as did the rest of my further maths class) it would work out at 1 per comp school..... there needs to be grammar schools so the best students can learn together without being held up by the less academically able...
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    (Original post by The Ace is Back)
    And the flipside of that, which you conveniently overlook, is that most people are not interested in advancing the cause of non-selective education apart from those who have a vested interest in it - i.e. those who were/are less capable, and those who did not enjoy the experience. Which, happily for you, turns out to be a majority of the population. Safety in numbers, as they say.
    There are many, many selfless people who do care about EVERYONES standad of education.

    My parents could well have afforded to send me to Eton if they wanted, but my Dad was adamant that i go to a conprehensive. And my mum, an avid socialist, actually tried to rally and lobby all of the parents in our middle-class area, with an idea to get them all, including me, to go to a comprehensive that was at the bottom of the league tables in our city, to prove a political point. But that didn't go down to well at the area meetings!
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    (Original post by yawn)
    I wouldn't want someone on my team who is not articulate, persuasive and intelligent enough to appreciate who is winning the debate!
    As far as I can tell, it's certainly not you.
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    (Original post by The Ace is Back)
    And the flipside of that, which you conveniently overlook, is that most people are not interested in advancing the cause of non-selective education apart from those who have a vested interest in it - i.e. those who were/are less capable, and those who did not enjoy the experience. Which, happily for you, turns out to be a majority of the population. Safety in numbers, as they say.
    Well that is a non-starter observation since I am interested in advancing the cause of 'all-ability' schools despite being more capable than most of those currently attending selective schools, and having attended one myself without having previously considered the negative social impact on those who didn't.
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    (Original post by The Ace is Back)
    As far as I can tell, it's certainly not you.
    You are hardly an unbiased observer, yes?
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    (Original post by sebbie)
    i am the best at maths in my grammar school (although admittedly it is in the bottom 20% of grammar schools in the country)... if i went to one of the 7 or 8 comprehensives in my local area (as did the rest of my further maths class) it would work out at 1 per comp school..... there needs to be grammar schools so the best students can learn together without being held up by the less academically able...
    Did you bother to read anything? Even comprehensive schools have streaming. You wouldn't be dumped in a class full of people who cant add up even if you went to the countries' worst comp.

    And consider that middle- class parents pay for tuition for their children to pass the 11+. Tuition that poorer parents cannot afford. And so the system is cheated, and it's unfair.
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    (Original post by cottonmouth)
    There are many, many selfless people who do care about EVERYONES standad of education.
    Unfortunately I am not so optimistic about human nature.

    (Original post by cottonmouth)
    My parents could well have afforded to send me to Eton if they wanted, but my Dad was adamant that i go to a conprehensive.
    Ah, but the question is - would Eton want you?

    (Original post by cottonmouth)
    And my mum, an avid socialist, actually tried to rally and lobby all of the parents in our middle-class area, with an idea to get them all, including me, to go to a comprehensive that was at the bottom of the league tables in our city, to prove a political point. But that didn't go down to well at the area meetings!
    Haha, I can imagine.
 
 
 
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