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    Search the Internet for O level papers from 25 years ago. You'll find in the same subjects that most of what was taught to 14 - 16 year olds then is now in today's 16/17 year old AS level syllabuses, with bits appearing even in the A2 Level.

    What has changed is the volume of pointless sh*te that 16-18 year olds are expected to do - "pump up the volume". Poor pre-university kids have to waste hundreds of hours on waffle: Citizenshit, General Studies, Team Building, Numeracy etc. Back in the days when qualifications meant something, these kinds of skills were developed through voluntary work, activity weekends, sport etc, with no exams unless you wanted to get certificated.

    Nowadays, you have every skiving moron under the sun getting Es and Ds without lifting a finger. You have students doing A Levels who can't work out a basic percentage in their head, add two numbers together without a calculator and don't have the ability to string a sentence together that makes sense to at least 50% of the Engliush-speaking world. Unluckily as well, there are now so many joke A Levels around that the whole system has been undermined. Still, students who finish Uni with a Media Studies degree (third class), a £20,000 debt with no job can feel very proud.
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    not another media studies bashing thread....purlease! :rolleyes:
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    Unless you have taken the same A-level twenty-five years ago and today I don't think you have the right to comment.
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    I find it amazing how hostile old people are in defending their education.
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    (Original post by freddy6k)
    Search the Internet for O level papers from 25 years ago. You'll find in the same subjects that most of what was taught to 14 - 16 year olds then is now in today's 16/17 year old AS level syllabuses, with bits appearing even in the A2 Level.

    What has changed is the volume of pointless sh*te that 16-18 year olds are expected to do - "pump up the volume". Poor pre-university kids have to waste hundreds of hours on waffle: Citizenshit, General Studies, Team Building, Numeracy etc. Back in the days when qualifications meant something, these kinds of skills were developed through voluntary work, activity weekends, sport etc, with no exams unless you wanted to get certificated.

    Nowadays, you have every skiving moron under the sun getting Es and Ds without lifting a finger. You have students doing A Levels who can't work out a basic percentage in their head, add two numbers together without a calculator and don't have the ability to string a sentence together that makes sense to at least 50% of the Engliush-speaking world. Unluckily as well, there are now so many joke A Levels around that the whole system has been undermined. Still, students who finish Uni with a Media Studies degree (third class), a £20,000 debt with no job can feel very proud.

    You really are a **** aren't you? I have micky mouse A levels crappy GCSEs but doing a good degree and did get a good grades at A level. I have a great part time job which will lead me to many other great jobs in the future.

    But hey A levels are useless and anybody can get them, despite the fact if I didn't decide to get an educaton I would be building PCs for £5 an hour now full time.

    How old are you? I bet you have not done A levels recently. In fact I think you're a bitter twisted 45 year old street hygein officer (the modern term for bin man) who didn't even manage to pass his/her O levels.
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    (Original post by freddy6k)
    Search the Internet for O level papers from 25 years ago. You'll find in the same subjects that most of what was taught to 14 - 16 year olds then is now in today's 16/17 year old AS level syllabuses, with bits appearing even in the A2 Level.

    What has changed is the volume of pointless sh*te that 16-18 year olds are expected to do - "pump up the volume". Poor pre-university kids have to waste hundreds of hours on waffle: Citizenshit, General Studies, Team Building, Numeracy etc. Back in the days when qualifications meant something, these kinds of skills were developed through voluntary work, activity weekends, sport etc, with no exams unless you wanted to get certificated.

    Nowadays, you have every skiving moron under the sun getting Es and Ds without lifting a finger. You have students doing A Levels who can't work out a basic percentage in their head, add two numbers together without a calculator and don't have the ability to string a sentence together that makes sense to at least 50% of the Engliush-speaking world. Unluckily as well, there are now so many joke A Levels around that the whole system has been undermined. Still, students who finish Uni with a Media Studies degree (third class), a £20,000 debt with no job can feel very proud.
    "Still, students who finish Uni with a Media Studies degree (third class), a £20,000 debt with no job can feel very proud." - Stop being such an *******.
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    (Original post by freddy6k)
    Search the Internet for O level papers from 25 years ago. You'll find in the same subjects that most of what was taught to 14 - 16 year olds then is now in today's 16/17 year old AS level syllabuses, with bits appearing even in the A2 Level.

    What has changed is the volume of pointless sh*te that 16-18 year olds are expected to do - "pump up the volume". Poor pre-university kids have to waste hundreds of hours on waffle: Citizenshit, General Studies, Team Building, Numeracy etc. Back in the days when qualifications meant something, these kinds of skills were developed through voluntary work, activity weekends, sport etc, with no exams unless you wanted to get certificated.

    Nowadays, you have every skiving moron under the sun getting Es and Ds without lifting a finger. You have students doing A Levels who can't work out a basic percentage in their head, add two numbers together without a calculator and don't have the ability to string a sentence together that makes sense to at least 50% of the Engliush-speaking world. Unluckily as well, there are now so many joke A Levels around that the whole system has been undermined. Still, students who finish Uni with a Media Studies degree (third class), a £20,000 debt with no job can feel very proud.
    Some A-levels are indeed easier than 25 years ago, maths being the prime example.

    For others, the syllabus has just changed, and the focus is more on understanding than learning parrot-fashion.

    Otherwise, your comments are rubbish and unnecessarily derogatory.
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    I got a lot of neg rep for this post even though it seems everybody agrees with what I was saying. My neg rep said I was abusive? Well is it more wasn't the orginal thread quite abusive?

    Why not go on a joinery forum and **** of A levels, why come on a site when you know there is a lot of students taking them. People that undermine youing peoples hard work make me sick.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    I got a lot of neg rep for this post even though it seems everybody agrees with what I was saying. My neg rep said I was abusive? Well is it more wasn't the orginal thread quite abusive?

    Why not go on a joinery forum and **** of A levels, why come on a site when you know there is a lot of students taking them. People that undermine youing peoples hard work make me sick.
    "joinery forum" how patronising what makes you think that the person who posted doesnt have qualifications. Their post although I dont agree with its content appeared highly articulate to me.

    Hes made his point you've made yours but you could raise a decent counter argument to his post rather than calling him a **** and calling him bitter and twisted.
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    (Original post by viviki)
    "joinery forum" how patronising what makes you think that the person who posted doesnt have qualifications. Their post although I dont agree with its content appeared highly articulate to me.

    Hes made his point you've made yours but you could raise a decent counter argument to his post rather than calling him a **** and calling him bitter and twisted.
    Actually, "joinery" isn't such a bad idea. I recently heard that 70% of plumbing apprentices are graduates that couldn't find white collar work so instead are learning a trade that will gross them 70k a year. Anybody know if this a fact?
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    (Original post by Howard)
    Actually, "joinery" isn't such a bad idea. I recently heard that 70% of plumbing apprentices are graduates that couldn't find white collar work so instead are learning a trade that will gross them 70k a year. Anybody know if this a fact?
    No, only a few few people make that money, to make £70k you have to run your own business. My mates 22 and is a joiner, he is stille arning £6 an hour like most construction workers.

    There is money in plumbing but you have to be very good. The other way of making money from plumbing is ilegal.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    Actually, "joinery" isn't such a bad idea. I recently heard that 70% of plumbing apprentices are graduates that couldn't find white collar work so instead are learning a trade that will gross them 70k a year. Anybody know if this a fact?
    Yes a London college was oversubscribed to do a Plumbing apprentiship, i also read that a post-grad with honours in Bio-chemistry or some such was applying and that a lot of other people were doing the same.
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    I did my A-Level chem in 1994. The stuff we covered then is now not covered at A-Level, but at University level (part one).

    I remember being shown a past paper from 10 years previous to my A-Level chem. We thought it was identical and got cocky about how on earth can people claim A-Levels are getting easier. It was at this juncture our teacher interjected with the vital piece of info. It was an O-Level paper!

    Sorry guys but I am a firm believer that A-Levels are getting easier. But then again in todays educational climate you are being encouraged to be more rounded with a range of subject matter incompasing both the arts and the sciences, and from what I can see from tutoring etc. 4 or 5 A-Levels seems to be the norm. There is no way on earth the norm could be 4-5 with the content of previous years.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    Actually, "joinery" isn't such a bad idea. I recently heard that 70% of plumbing apprentices are graduates that couldn't find white collar work so instead are learning a trade that will gross them 70k a year. Anybody know if this a fact?
    One of my collegues from my D.Phil (also now has a D.Phil) is indeed training to be a plumber. The lack of money in academic research is shocking. 18-20K for 7 years of hard work really is dire.

    They will be Dr. French (D.Phil., Oxon) Master Plumber.
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    I did my A-Level chem in 1994. The stuff we covered then is now not covered at A-Level, but at University level (part one).

    I remember being shown a past paper from 10 years previous to my A-Level chem. We thought it was identical and got cocky about how on earth can people claim A-Levels are getting easier. It was at this juncture our teacher interjected with the vital piece of info. It was an O-Level paper!

    Sorry guys but I am a firm believer that A-Levels are getting easier. But then again in todays educational climate you are being encouraged to be more rounded with a range of subject matter incompasing both the arts and the sciences, and from what I can see from tutoring etc. 4 or 5 A-Levels seems to be the norm. There is no way on earth the norm could be 4-5 with the content of previous years.
    Does it not occure to you that things change hence the content won't be the same? My degee contents change every year but it dosn't mean its getting any easier, it just means that things change.
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    As pointless as I think alevel and media studies bashing is, I cannot deny that older papers seem much harder.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    Does it not occure to you that things change hence the content won't be the same? My degee contents change every year but it dosn't mean its getting any easier, it just means that things change.
    Of course it does! But given the level we studied to isn't even covered at A-Level now, but degree level, are you not getting the message?

    Right! From tutoring, here are my observations, based on hard fact:

    Todays A-Level syllabus (regardless of board) is made up of:
    year two GCSCE as was in 1992.
    year 1 A-level as was in 1993.

    This is fact - go and dig out syllabuses!

    Every student gets the 'things are getting easier, in my day...' thing. We did 10 years ago, people 20 years ago did and I dare say today it's exactly the same.
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    People seem to see it as a personal attack and an insult to their intelligence when the solidity of their education is questioned.

    Fact of the matter is, I agree with sentiments of the original poster.

    However, what people need to keep in mind, is that it isn’t their fault. I think people are confusing two issues: the difficulty of education, and intelligence of students - this being the reason for the passionate defences.

    Seriously now - the human race has suddenly mutated in the last however many years, and become decidedly inferior in terms of intelligence relative to their counterparts of X years ago.

    It’s simply the case that we’re not being taught as effectively, and thus can’t be expected to be able to answer question papers from a period when teaching, and syllabuses were in all honesty, more challenging.
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    (Original post by piginapoke)
    It may be that things just seem easier to older people.

    I certainly look at the A-levels in subjects I took and think they look easy, but the syllabi aren't too different (finished A-levels in 1994) and I remember them being rather hard (for me) at the time. The difficulty comes not with the material itself, but with the short time we have for it to 'sink in'.

    Also, you have to remember that teaching methods have improved, and there is a lot more reference material available (online) than there was in the good old days. Try doing today's A-level coursework with a couple of reference books and an hour's tutorial per week and nothing else.
    What about modualr A-Levels... I think it's so the way forwards and wished we had that option. Much better than being examined on 2 years worth of stuff..... Makes it easier to achieve higher grades.

    Also the net has made study so much easier.
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    Of course it does! But given the level we studied to isn't even covered at A-Level now, but degree level, are you not getting the message?

    Right! From tutoring, here are my observations, based on hard fact:

    Todays A-Level syllabus (regardless of board) is made up of:
    year two GCSCE as was in 1992.
    year 1 A-level as was in 1993.

    This is fact - go and dig out syllabuses!

    Every student gets the 'things are getting easier, in my day...' thing. We did 10 years ago, people 20 years ago did and I dare say today it's exactly the same.
    Right fluffy gently ease yourself from the disease I like to call assmosis (being taken too far up one's own ass!) You must be around 27 or so and guess what you aren't still in school. At the minute my science teachers give me both chemistry and biology papers to do and some of them have been as from as far back as 1991! And whilst they are by no means a walk over, lo and behold, I ace them much more than I do the current papers. So why don't you stop all this 'I'm much older than you and therefore know more' ********. The only difference between these papers is that you are expected to have done extra reading. It is never really a case of how your mind can be stretched but more how much general knowledge do you know. Today's papers are more geared towards applying your knowledge and is not really suited for those who have memories like sponges. So before you go blowing your own trumpet about how you think that your A-levels were harder, try removing your head from your ass. You might think a little clearer that way. And don try the 'I getting DPhil at Oxford' one. I hear enough of that on another forum.!
 
 
 
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