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    (Original post by piginapoke)
    Presumably you mean knowledge not intelligence... but I disagree, I think we are just knowledgeable in different ways. For example, the people of the 19th century generally had a much better vocabulary than people of today, but had much less scientific, mathematical, and other knowledge.
    No, I mean intelligence.

    Attacking intelligence is more personal than attacking knowledge, since it can't be changed and is integral to who you are. That's what people are confusing, hence the spirited defence of A-Levels.

    And although you're right with your comment about dispersion of knowledge, I think the knowledge we're referring to here is very specific since it is in the context of subject knowledge at A-Level, and is therefore comparable, and obviously less now than it was then.
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    What about modualr A-Levels... I think it's so the way forwards and wished we had that option. Much better than being examined on 2 years worth of stuff..... Makes it easier to achieve higher grades.

    Also the net has made study so much easier.
    Ah there you go! A-Levels have not got any easier but instead the means by which we are able to access information has improved. Modules increase the chances of getting higher grades because they give you a second chance and not because the content has been watered down! In all honest I would rather have big exam at the end of two years instead of six modules.
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    (Original post by calumc)
    They're definately easier - and not just in content, the structure too. The exams I'm doing (SQA Advanced Higher) have a single, bloody hard final paper which counts for everything, just like in the old days. A-levels, on the other hand, are now split into 6 parts with the option of resits and god-knows what else. Resits! Modules! How pathetic - if you don't know the whole course to a high standard at the end of it, you don't deserve to pass.
    That's really a myth. All the subjects have effective synoptic papers.
    For examples with my subjects

    Maths: P3, this has a specified synoptic element, where it must bring in an applied situation (this is usually a differential equation to be setup)

    Economics: Economics in a european context, this is a huge exam with about 15 pages of literature that I have to read, and use my 2 year's worth of economics toolkit to comment on. This really does require you to know all of the modules perfectly, because they expect a couple of 8 side essays in the couple of hours we have to do it.

    Physics: The synoptic paper module 6, where they will bring up a topic from any of the non optional modules (so basically all 6 of them). And it will be a long, unpredictable discursive question which requires totally different skills from the rest of the exams. It's difficult because for the rest of the course they teach fundamental concepts of physics, where the focus is on calculations, terminology, historic background, and applying knowledge, students have to be introduced to things like basic calculus. Then suddenly they have to start writing discursive essays on the use of particle accelerators. It's not easy.

    For all of the alevels, there is this synoptic element, which is really just a reversion to the old alevel style. Ie. a big long paper which tests all of the 2 years thoroughly.

    Also, people think the modular system allows us to just perfect our exam technique and get 100%. And I admit certainly in the earlier basic modules that's certainly possible. But there is still alot of content and certainly in my school we do not have weeks to go through past papers like some people think we do. We finished modules like P3 days before the exam last year. This year, we're still on the second module for physics, so we still have half of this module, and the last module to do before the exams which start at the end of May. This is gonna be a huge squeeze.
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    (Original post by quantum)
    Right fluffy gently ease yourself from the disease I like to call assmosis (being taken too far up one's own ass!) You must be around 27 or so and guess what you aren't still in school.
    No you are right I am 27. And I have tutored A-Level candidates in the last 12 months.

    AS for the D.Phil comment - take a chill pill mate, and remove your head from your own from your ass! Glad to see that my presence upsets you and gets you so het up. Was getting bored of this site, but defo think I will stick around if for no other reason than to annoy you!

    Children.....
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    (Original post by piginapoke)
    Well you've hit the nail on the head with the system making it easier to achieve higher grades. This is beneficial in two ways - it shows that the students are picking up the knowledge better than ever before and it makes the statistics look good for the government. I don't think we should be ****ging off modular A-levels, rather we should **** off the old, inherently unfair system.
    Finally someone who speaks sense! Thank you! Thank you! Thank y-o-u!
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    This year, we're still on the second module for physics, so we still have half of this module, and the last module to do before the exams which start at the end of May. This is gonna be a huge squeeze.
    WTF?!
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    (Original post by piginapoke)
    I've said that at least twice already, don't go taking the credit for it!
    Letts Revision Guides!
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    For those against the modular system, I was just wondering you how you would structure a maths alevel without modular exams? If it were to contain the same material as today, everything from basic quadratic expressions to integration by parts or substitution, from basic suvat equations to variable forces which require differential equations in mechanics? Anybody who can do P3 integrations can solve a quadratic, anybody who can solve variable force problems can use v = u + at. I just don't see how you could test both of these skills on the same paper.
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    No you are right I am 27. And I have tutored A-Level candidates in the last 12 months.

    AS for the D.Phil comment - take a chill pill mate, and remove your head from your own from your ass! Glad to see that my presence upsets you and gets you so het up. Was getting bored of this site, but defo think I will stick around if for no other reason than to annoy you!

    Children.....
    Be my guest! I guess I'm just as bored as you are. Perhaps even more so. But don't worry, once your pompous drivel starts boring me I'll log off and run for my life for fear of dying. I'm still young after al and have so much to do.
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    (Original post by bono)
    Letts Revision Guides!
    You're signiture has caused be to have a fit of laughs. Thanks.
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    (Original post by bono)
    WTF?!
    So that is as desparately worrying as it sounds. Oh dear. I was hoping perhaps I was just being silly.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    You really are a **** aren't you? I have micky mouse A levels crappy GCSEs but doing a good degree and did get a good grades at A level. I have a great part time job which will lead me to many other great jobs in the future.

    But hey A levels are useless and anybody can get them, despite the fact if I didn't decide to get an educaton I would be building PCs for £5 an hour now full time.

    How old are you? I bet you have not done A levels recently. In fact I think you're a bitter twisted 45 year old street hygein officer (the modern term for bin man) who didn't even manage to pass his/her O levels.
    Actually, I think you are being the **** here. For the old style papers I've looked at in maths, physics, french and spanish the standard is clearly much more difficult. The same amount of knowledge and understanding that would get a good A today, would get at best a C in older papers. Perhaps freddy6k's last sentence was a little harsh, but overall it made a good deal more sense than yours. I've noticed that you are always very quick to criticise those who claim A Levels are getting easier, and you always tell us how hard you had to work (which is completely irrelevant). Whatever grades you achieved, I'm sure they would have been alot worse had you taken the old style A Level and this is essentially all the thread-starter is saying.
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    For those against the modular system, I was just wondering you how you would structure a maths alevel without modular exams? If it were to contain the same material as today, everything from basic quadratic expressions to integration by parts or substitution, from basic suvat equations to variable forces which require differential equations in mechanics? Anybody who can do P3 integrations can solve a quadratic, anybody who can solve variable force problems can use v = u + at. I just don't see how you could test both of these skills on the same paper.
    It wasn't just one paper, but usually between 3 or 4 spread over 3 weeks (obviously interjected with exam papers for your other subjects). they wouldn't nec. be on the same paper, you would just have to retain all info for the grand finale 2 years down the line....
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    (Original post by amexblack)
    Actually, I think you are being the **** here. For the old style papers I've looked at in maths, physics, french and spanish the standard is clearly much more difficult. The same amount of knowledge and understanding that would get a good A today, would get at best a C in older papers. Perhaps freddy6k's last sentence was a little harsh, but overall it made a good deal more sense than yours. I've noticed that you are always very quick to criticise those who claim A Levels are getting easier, and you always tell us how hard you had to work (which is completely irrelevant). Whatever grades you achieved, I'm sure they would have been alot worse had you taken the old style A Level and this is essentially all the thread-starter is saying.
    Yes I am sure I would have done but the then I would have gone into university much easier. As the A level results improve universities are also pushing up their grade bounderies all the time. In the 1960's you could study medicine at A level at Oxford with just CCC. Now AAA is probably not even enough.
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    (Original post by quantum)
    Be my guest! I guess I'm just as bored as you are. Perhaps even more so. But don't worry, once your pompous drivel starts boring me I'll log off and run for my life for fear of dying. I'm still young after al and have so much to do.

    Lol! If I wasn't getting to you, you wouldn't have risen to that! Ahhh the youth of today... sooooo predicatable!

    And if your little mind can't cope with active debate get out of the arena!
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    Lol! If I wasn't getting to you, you wouldn't have risen to that! Ahhh the youth of today... sooooo predicatable!

    And if your little mind can't cope with active debate get out of the arena!

    First of all- I never said you weren't getting to me so, why you made that up....well god only knows. Who said I can't cope with active debate? You were the one getting bored of this forum. Ah the elderly of society....so unnecessarily condascending.......
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    It wasn't just one paper, but usually between 3 or 4 spread over 3 weeks (obviously interjected with exam papers for your other subjects). they wouldn't nec. be on the same paper, you would just have to retain all info for the grand finale 2 years down the line....
    Still, is it really workable to have questions like:

    find the solutions of the equation

    x^2 + 5x + 6 = 0 [1 mark]

    next to questions like, find the solutions of the equation

    d^3.x/dy^3 - 7dy/dx - 3y = 7 sinx [8 marks]
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    Yes I am sure I would have done but the then I would have gone into university much easier. As the A level results improve universities are also pushing up their grade bounderies all the time. In the 1960's you could study medicine at A level at Oxford with just CCC. Now AAA is probably not even enough.
    This is so true Up until late 70's Medicine was a 'CCC' sunject, but nowerdays more people hit an A, making Uni admissions based largely on A-Level performance a nightmare. Will be interesting to see if the current proposals for interviewing post A-Level result come to fruition. There are two main proposals 1) all Uni interviews (where used) will take place in the summer holidays, and all offers will be made in this period too. 2) enforced gap.applicaiton years.
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    (Original post by calumc)
    Well, my exam could!
    And you don't think the first question would be a pointless waste of time, since anybody doing an Alevel in Maths would be taught to solve differential equations, and so there would be 99% success rate for the first question?
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    (Original post by quantum)
    First of all- I never said you weren't getting to me so, why you made that up....well god only knows. Who said I can't cope with active debate? You were the one getting bored of this forum. Ah the elderly of society....so unnecessarily condascending.......
    Hmmm so...

    (Original post by quantum)
    Right fluffy gently ease yourself from the disease I like to call assmosis (being taken too far up one's own ass!)
    Is your usual way of adressing people.... Let's hope you're applying for courses that don't require interview

    And how could I ever get bored with a sweet little mouse like you to bat around?
 
 
 
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