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    (Original post by 2776)
    1. Matrices is not the hardest subject. It is a piss take.

    2. P6 is not hard, it is supposed to be a self contained module, ie after P3, you can do P6 befiore P4 or P5.

    3. IGCSE do Matrices, and your mum did it in A levels, from your conclusion we see that actually standards have increased...
    What's your point? If it's so easy, why isn't it in A-level maths? It probably used to be, possibly even as "assumed knowledge", but now someone can get 100% in A-level maths and think a matrix is something to do with little green symbols and Keanu Reeves.
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    I have to admit I have STEP papers from 2003 to 1990. The difference between 2003 and 1995 is shocking, the difference between 2003 and 1990 is incomprehensible. It's not just Alevels.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    I have no idea what a Matrice is:confused:
    You probably have a natural appreciation of them though. A bit like an array I suppose, but with their own rules for manipulation.
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    I sincerely think A levels are a piss take. Take economics, you could learn the whole subject with a solid days revision (12 hours), enough to get at least a B.
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    You probably have a natural appreciation of them though. A bit like an array I suppose, but with their own rules for manipulation.
    Yeah I think I know what you mean, I had to write a program in Java which had a table of numbers and their was certain ways you manipulated them, is that a matrice?
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    (Original post by Lepr)
    I sincerely think A levels are a piss take. Take economics, you could learn the whole subject with a solid days revision (12 hours), enough to get at least a B.
    Alevel economics taught me how to argue effectively, and structure essays. It's more than just learning the arguments for free trade.
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    (Original post by Bigcnee)
    I find it amazing how hostile old people are in defending their education.
    Yes, you can be quite vindictive sometimes.
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    I was under the impression that the governing boards made it so that those achieving the top grades where in proportion with the amount of people taking the subject. So in effect the amount who got grade 'E's would be similiar to the amount back years ago.
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    Alevel economics taught me how to argue effectively, and structure essays. It's more than just learning the arguments for free trade.
    Well, if it is, it shouldn't be. This isn't a personal attack, but you, and everyone, should have learned how to 'structure essays' and 'argue effectively' by the time GCSEs were over.
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    (Original post by amazingtrade)
    Yeah I think I know what you mean, I had to write a program in Java which had a table of numbers and their was certain ways you manipulated them, is that a matrice?
    Probably!

    ___

    On this note though, US students learn complex numbers, including demoivre's etc at a mere 15 years of age, they also learn how to solve systems of linear equations, either through substitution or with a matrix. They learn advanced techniques with logarithms. I repeat all at the age of 15,when British kids are still calculating the areas of parallelograms. Does that make them as able a mathematician as an 18 year old doing A2 further maths?
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    (Original post by Bhaal85)
    I was under the impression that the governing boards made it so that those achieving the top grades where in proportion with the amount of people taking the subject. So in effect the amount who got grade 'E's would be similiar to the amount back years ago.
    Yes, but the syllabus content has been reduced, as you can see by looking at old papers.
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    (Original post by Lepr)
    Well, if it is, it shouldn't be. This isn't a personal attack, but you, and everyone, should have learned how to 'structure essays' and 'argue effectively' by the time GCSEs were over.
    When? An economics essay looks nothing like an english essay. I haven't done any history since year 8.
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    (Original post by calumc)
    What's your point? If it's so easy, why isn't it in A-level maths? It probably used to be, possibly even as "assumed knowledge", but now someone can get 100% in A-level maths and think a matrix is something to do with little green symbols and Keanu Reeves.
    1. I am not the QCA I don't specify what the exam boards have to put inito the exams

    2. Whats your point?
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    When? An economics essay looks nothing like an english essay. I haven't done any history since year 8.
    Ok, but structuring essays is pretty uniform for each subject (and elementary), just be coherent and concise, it shouldn't take long at all to pick up and is common sense to intelligent people like yourself.

    With regards to arguing effectively, surely this comes intuitively from understanding the material.
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    Ian. I know when you'll come across matrices. Graphics! Matrices represent transformations of coordinates in 2 dimensions, and probably 3 dimensions too! Matrices are absolutely essential in computer games design.
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    (Original post by 2776)
    1. I am not the QCA I don't specify what the exam boards have to put inito the exams

    2. Whats your point?
    1. I didn't say you were.

    2. A-levels have got easier.
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    (Original post by Lepr)
    Ok, but structuring essays is pretty uniform for each subject (and elementary), just be coherent and concise, it shouldn't take long at all to pick up and is common sense to intelligent people like yourself.

    With regards to arguing effectively, surely this comes intuitively from understanding the material.
    Well what can I say, without economics I'd probably be writing incoherent inconcise essays. I needed to be taught that essays need points, arguments supporting those points, evaluations of those argument, conclusions etc.

    But now I'm waffling.

    What do you think the alevel economics syllabus should include?
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    Well what can I say, without economics I'd probably be writing incoherent inconcise essays. I needed to be taught that essays need points, arguments supporting those points, evaluations of those argument, conclusions etc.

    But now I'm waffling.

    What do you think the alevel economics syllabus should include?
    Less labour economics! I can't stand that unit. And more maths, economics at university is more mathematical, why is it not at a level?
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    (Original post by fishpaste)
    Well what can I say, without economics I'd probably be writing incoherent inconcise essays. I needed to be taught that essays need points, arguments supporting those points, evaluations of those argument, conclusions etc.

    But now I'm waffling.

    What do you think the alevel economics syllabus should include?
    Do you do the AQA syllabus? I'll answer your question depending on how you answer this.
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    (Original post by Mysticmin)
    Less labour economics! I can't stand that unit. And more maths, economics at university is more mathematical, why is it not at a level?
    Because then economics would be limited to those students doing Alevel maths unless you want to start teaching the calculus of those functions I associate with economics at GCSE. That is, you'd have to know how to integrate the k/x function at GCSE, then you'd have to know about log functions because of course that is the evaluated integral of k/x . All to do the mathematics behind a unitary demand curve.

    Stick to the mathematical game theory me thinks.
 
 
 
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