lauste05
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
Hey everyone,
I'm just about to start the EPQ and need help on getting a well phrased question as I have found my original question can't be researched very well. I would like to do either family or corporate law for my 5000 word dissertation.

Thank you for your help
Lauren
0
reply
vahik92
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#2
Report 6 years ago
#2
(Original post by lauste05)
Hey everyone,
I'm just about to start the EPQ and need help on getting a well phrased question as I have found my original question can't be researched very well. I would like to do either family or corporate law for my 5000 word dissertation.

Thank you for your help
Lauren
If you really want an impressive EPQ, I have to warn you it will be extremely difficult. Law is hard subject. Here are some good questions:

1) What is law? Is there an obligation to obey the law? (The starting point for the last question is that surely law cannot claim that there is obligation to obey the law from inside or from within it. E.g. Law X says that people must obey the law, but where does the obligation to obey the law X come from?). So it's an open question. Note, you would have to do a lot of reading from some dreadful books if you want to impress them. Nevertheless, this is such a simple question and is so interesting to all people and not just lawyers that your examiner will enjoy reading your work.

2) Is law natural or artificial? In other words, was law discovered or invented? Discovered must be taken in its literal sense, not that people accidentally came across a book full of laws, but in a sense that laws reflect natural justice, they reflect morals, they want to achieve the common good but at the same time what is the common good is arguable, it differs from one person to another, so who decides what the common good is? They say a terrorist of one country is a hero for another, so whose opinion matters on whether one is a terrorist or a hero? e.g. Bin Laden was certainly a terrorist for US but there are increasing and heavy arguments that US itself is another terrorist, though legalised. On the other hand, there are artificial laws. e.g. driving with no insurance is an offence. Full stop. Is this natural? Certainly not. It does not reflect any morals, any justice, or anything else. It simply reflects the policies of the politicians, that's all.

The two above questions are very simple because you do not need to know much substantial law. There are thousands of good questions for your dissertation about law but I'm afraid until you study Law, you will be unable to answer those.
4
reply
zaliack
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#3
Report 6 years ago
#3
In all honesty, you should ditch the idea of doing family/corporate law as an EPQ and focus on a more generic 'law' one, or perhaps one of the core modules (particularly constitutional law). If you want to understand corporate law, you need to understand contract, equity & trusts and even tort law, which is why it is a third year module.
0
reply
Hulllawyer
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#4
Report 6 years ago
#4
(Original post by lauste05)
Hey everyone,
I'm just about to start the EPQ and need help on getting a well phrased question as I have found my original question can't be researched very well. I would like to do either family or corporate law for my 5000 word dissertation.

Thank you for your help
Lauren

What draws you to those two areas?
0
reply
lauste05
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#5
(Original post by Hulllawyer)
What draws you to those two areas?
Ive read a lot on family law and find it a rather interesting area and I'm going to have work experience at Hogan Lovell's over christmas and thought it might be a good idea to read more into what they do. Ive been told my essay cannot be a general and vague question but a rather specific one so that I don't get carried away with my research or dissertation.
0
reply
vaguity
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#6
Report 6 years ago
#6
(Original post by vahik92)
If you really want an impressive EPQ, I have to warn you it will be extremely difficult. Law is hard subject. Here are some good questions:

1) What is law? Is there an obligation to obey the law? (The starting point for the last question is that surely law cannot claim that there is obligation to obey the law from inside or from within it. E.g. Law X says that people must obey the law, but where does the obligation to obey the law X come from?). So it's an open question. Note, you would have to do a lot of reading from some dreadful books if you want to impress them. Nevertheless, this is such a simple question and is so interesting to all people and not just lawyers that your examiner will enjoy reading your work.
I'm doing that!
I've not read any books though (I'm not paying like £20-25 each!), just some journals etc...well quite often only parts of them (shhh) since they weren't always relevant.

It's really interesting OP, I'd recommend it! I've looked at Hobbes and Lock and that Roushoweveryouspellit guy and the social contract theory, Socrates in the 'Crito', gratitude, consent, fair play and associative obligations!
Although I'm really struggling to keep within the word limit grr Gone over by just over 200 for my lit review section. So glad footnotes can be excluded otherwise I'd be like twice the limit.

I think it's the process that you really get marked for, not so much on your actual content, so there's no point in picking something overly challenging.

I think it might be quite hard to get a question on those and be able to find appropriate information. I wanted to do something around medical law but had to give up because it was too hard to find stuff.
0
reply
Hulllawyer
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#7
Report 6 years ago
#7
(Original post by lauste05)
Ive read a lot on family law and find it a rather interesting area and I'm going to have work experience at Hogan Lovell's over christmas and thought it might be a good idea to read more into what they do. Ive been told my essay cannot be a general and vague question but a rather specific one so that I don't get carried away with my research or dissertation.
What areas of family law have you read about?
0
reply
lauste05
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#8
(Original post by Hulllawyer)
What areas of family law have you read about?
mainly about parental responsibilities, the differences between marriage, domestic partnerships and civil unions, and issues that arise in marriage like domestic abuse
0
reply
Hulllawyer
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#9
Report 6 years ago
#9
(Original post by lauste05)
mainly about parental responsibilities, the differences between marriage, domestic partnerships and civil unions, and issues that arise in marriage like domestic abuse
Have you talked to your EPQ tutor about what might be a good area for you?
0
reply
vaguity
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#10
Report 6 years ago
#10
(Original post by lauste05)
mainly about parental responsibilities, the differences between marriage, domestic partnerships and civil unions, and issues that arise in marriage like domestic abuse
I went to this law discussion thing on domestic abuse and they raised the question of whether people who report being abused should be forced to go to court and provide evidence against their attacker, because conviction rates are so low.
0
reply
Hulllawyer
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#11
Report 6 years ago
#11
(Original post by vaguity)
I went to this law discussion thing on domestic abuse and they raised the question of whether people who report being abused should be forced to go to court and provide evidence against their attacker, because conviction rates are so low.
One of the main reasons why prosecutions for domestic abuse are so rarely successful is that the victim usually withdraws their testimony. I understand this is because they have some sort of psychological co-dependency relationship with their abuser. Also if they go through with it the abuser will beat them up and possibly kill them.

Do EPQ projects have to break new ground? I was lucky enough to happen on an area which had never been considered, so as far as I know I am the world expert on one very neglected and obscure area of law, but I'm not sure if you can go over old ground. I mention it because this area will have been covered many times by people much smarter than everyone on this thread put together, a new angle or new insight (if one is necessary) might be hard to find. Obviously an area with lots of literature is an advantage if you don't need to break new ground.
0
reply
zaliack
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#12
Report 6 years ago
#12
(Original post by Hulllawyer)
One of the main reasons why prosecutions for domestic abuse are so rarely successful is that the victim usually withdraws their testimony. I understand this is because they have some sort of psychological co-dependency relationship with their abuser. Also if they go through with it the abuser will beat them up and possibly kill them.

Do EPQ projects have to break new ground? I was lucky enough to happen on an area which had never been considered, so as far as I know I am the world expert on one very neglected and obscure area of law, but I'm not sure if you can go over old ground. I mention it because this area will have been covered many times by people much smarter than everyone on this thread put together, a new angle or new insight (if one is necessary) might be hard to find. Obviously an area with lots of literature is an advantage if you don't need to break new ground.
What area? And I very much doubt it's meant to be ground breaking, since it's only A level. Heck, only like 2% of the people in my class at uni could probably do ground breaking research for an essay (judging by the amount of people who got 80% or more in essays )
0
reply
Hulllawyer
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#13
Report 6 years ago
#13
(Original post by zaliack)
What area? And I very much doubt it's meant to be ground breaking, since it's only A level. Heck, only like 2% of the people in my class at uni could probably do ground breaking research for an essay (judging by the amount of people who got 80% or more in essays )
Why domestic violence victims refuse to testify and and whether they should be compelled to.

Maybe ground breaking wasn't the right term. Not re-hashing previous work. I know you have to do research (unless it's an artefact or something), even if it isn't the core of your dissertation. It seems logical that you must do something to some extent new, otherwise it isn't really research, but as you say that's a big ask at A level. Level 3 (A levels) is ' ability to gain ... apply a range of knowledge, skills and understanding ... detailed knowledge and skills ... go to university, people working independently ... supervising and training others' which could include the skill of doing research that hasn't been done before, but it would be much harder than, say, the lab technique test I had in Biology.
0
reply
vaguity
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#14
Report 6 years ago
#14
(Original post by Hulllawyer)
One of the main reasons why prosecutions for domestic abuse are so rarely successful is that the victim usually withdraws their testimony. I understand this is because they have some sort of psychological co-dependency relationship with their abuser. Also if they go through with it the abuser will beat them up and possibly kill them.

Do EPQ projects have to break new ground? I was lucky enough to happen on an area which had never been considered, so as far as I know I am the world expert on one very neglected and obscure area of law, but I'm not sure if you can go over old ground. I mention it because this area will have been covered many times by people much smarter than everyone on this thread put together, a new angle or new insight (if one is necessary) might be hard to find. Obviously an area with lots of literature is an advantage if you don't need to break new ground.
Yeah I know, that was why we decided against it in our discussion

And nope, it just has to be something debatable - I think on the Edexcel website it says a "controversial question". The whole point of the project is to develop independent learning, and you're supposed to get used to using sources etc so you really need something with lots of literature to be able to do the correct process (the actual content of your work doesn't get that many marks compared to the process etc, many marks come from organisation, planning etc).

I suppose you could break new ground, but unless you're REALLY interested in it, it's probably easier and safer to go with something you know you can do because in the end the examiners probably won't care if you've just covered old ground as long as you've gone about it correctly.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of East Anglia
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sun, 20 Oct '19
  • University for the Creative Arts
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sun, 20 Oct '19
  • University of Gloucestershire
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sun, 20 Oct '19

Have you made up your mind on your five uni choices?

Yes I know where I'm applying (101)
67.79%
No I haven't decided yet (28)
18.79%
Yes but I might change my mind (20)
13.42%

Watched Threads

View All