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    Has anyone done theirs yet? I have mine in a couple of days and am starting to get nervous.

    Does anyone have any tips/hints/suggestions so I don't stand there for ten minutes going 'ummmm', 'you know' and 'like'?
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    I've done mine, it won't be as bad as you think, don't worry. Practicing preparing individual passages might be an idea.
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    (Original post by DrSoySauce)
    Has anyone done theirs yet? I have mine in a couple of days and am starting to get nervous.

    Does anyone have any tips/hints/suggestions so I don't stand there for ten minutes going 'ummmm', 'you know' and 'like'?
    Yes I did mine in January. There were 19 possible passages/poems that could come out. I practiced annotating each one as well as speaking for each one. My friends and I started studying three weeks in advance by meeting together and writing down exactly what we were going to say if a certain passage came out. On the week b4 the oral we met together after school everyday and just practiced talking to each other. It's good if you have the class brain there coz you can listen and learn how they speak! By the time the orals came I guess you could say I had memorized 19 speeches...and on the day b4 my brain refused to do anymore annotating and talking!!! I just had to go to bed I think I did well on the day though, and it's not as a nerve racking experience as you think. I was so so nervous b4 I went in but once I sat down I felt pretty relaxed.

    Tips on annotating: always write your introduction on the top so you have a nice strong start. Writing down the conclusion is a good idea too.

    20 minutes doesn't really give you much time to write notes in detail, so what I did was as soon as I got the passage I immediately underlined the places I knew I wanted to talk about. But as I said b4, practice annotating the passages as much as you can, and time yourself, coz it really depends on the passage. For example, if I was to get Jane Austen's Emma (which I ended up getting) I knew I didn't have time to write detailed notes because there was so much text. So for that I knew I really had to rush and underline the points. But I knew that if I got a poem (by John Donne or Robert Frost) I knew I had some extra time to write some more details down.

    Use COLOURED pens! Makes it so much easier to look at your passage

    Tips on the commentary itself:

    I'm probably stating the obvious now but i'll write it anyway-

    -Use plenty of adjectives to make sure you score top marks for the personal response section. Eg. 'this perfectly chosen word', 'Austen's cunning technique' etc. It's also good to say how you felt about the passage now and then. For example if I had gotten Virginia Woolf I would have said something like 'being a female reader Woolf's words became all the more powerful'.
    - Don't worry about saying 'umm' and 'aaahh' occasionally, even the best students say it
    - Use plenty of literary terms - occupatio, juxtaposition, onomatopoeia, assonance, etc. !! haha, yes a duh, but it's a must!
    - If you have a poem it's nice to make an allusion to other poems by the same poet, though it's not necessary.
    - Even if you do miss out on some points, don't worry because the teacher will give you questions to help you answer that. Funny story: one guy in the SL class got John Donne, and the teacher asked him what kind of a poem it was at the end of his oral. Since he just went 'uhhhhh' the teacher mouthed 'v-a-l-e-d-i-c-t-i-o-n' (haha cheating..i know) and then guy went 'valedictorian?!'. Haha....poor soul. Close though

    I hope this helps!! Feel free to ask anything else! If you interested in what I had to study for it was 'Othello' by Shakespeare, 'A Room of One's Own' by Virginia Woolf, works of John Donne and Robert Frost, and 'Emma' by Jane Austen. If you've done the same thing I would be glad to help. It was hard work but in the end i'm glad, because you'll be an expert at the unseen commentary
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    A good way to do it is to talk about line by line, instead of focusing on like imagery. Jumping all over the things to group things in a topic is hard and you can get confused. Just go line by line. I can assure you will be able to say something for each line and by the time you said something for the 40 lines what you know time's up.


    In our oral a friend got mcbeth and the teacher asked who was present at a scene and he said all of them and forgot one. So he mimicked I dont know and the teacher mimicked back MCduff
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    (Original post by vavavoom)
    Yes I did mine in January. There were 19 possible passages/poems that could come out. I practiced annotating each one as well as speaking for each one. My friends and I started studying three weeks in advance by meeting together and writing down exactly what we were going to say if a certain passage came out. On the week b4 the oral we met together after school everyday and just practiced talking to each other. It's good if you have the class brain there coz you can listen and learn how they speak! By the time the orals came I guess you could say I had memorized 19 speeches...and on the day b4 my brain refused to do anymore annotating and talking!!! I just had to go to bed I think I did well on the day though, and it's not as a nerve racking experience as you think. I was so so nervous b4 I went in but once I sat down I felt pretty relaxed.

    19 passages!??!?! NINETEEN?? thats a bit excessive isnt it? where are u studying IB? we only had like 9! Thats HL!
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    (Original post by stressed_:x)
    19 passages!??!?! NINETEEN?? thats a bit excessive isnt it? where are u studying IB? we only had like 9! Thats HL!
    Only 9?!??! I study it in Japan. That's why I had to study 3 weeks in advance...
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    We could have gotten any passage out of Hamlet or Othello.
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    Ive done mine, we had around 8 possible passages. Just know the assigned works and be able to read into what you see in front of you.

    My weakest point was literary terms.


    The outline helps fantastically, speed write one in your preparation time


    Contxt
    -blah blah
    -blah

    Imagery
    -blah

    Relationship of chars.
    -blah


    etc.
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    We had four works; two novels, a collection of short stories and a collection of poems.
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    (Original post by BulMaster)
    A good way to do it is to talk about line by line, instead of focusing on like imagery. Jumping all over the things to group things in a topic is hard and you can get confused. Just go line by line. I can assure you will be able to say something for each line and by the time you said something for the 40 lines what you know time's up.
    Um, yeah, sure, if you want to do it the dullest way possible, then go line by line. Like imagery, motifs and **** are waayy too hard. This literature stuff is confusing. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by RyanMan262)
    Um, yeah, sure, if you want to do it the dullest way possible, then go line by line. Like imagery, motifs and **** are waayy too hard. This literature stuff is confusing. :rolleyes:
    One disillusioned person here. :rolleyes: Line by line is always the best way to go, as what you'll say will be coherent and you won't miss out on points.
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    Pardon the sarcasm, then. If you don't have to, don't go line by line: you are constricting the structure (and therefore effectiveness) of your arguments to an order predetermined by the author, who will seldom develop her motif/metaphor/theme/etc. strictly chronologically. If you're stumped, then sure, looks like you'll have to plod through it. But come on, you're an IB student - if you can see the important elements of the passage, then why weaken your analysis by breaking it into parts according to lines? It doesn't make any sense to go line-by-line on principle: you're making it easier on your brain, but you're not making your commentary any better.

    I do agree with snark about the outline, and vavavoom about the colored pens. Yeah, maybe it's obvious, but who knows, maybe it'll help someone...

    And I believe my school had 32 extracts.
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    I didn't go line by line (then again I was analysing a short story). I talked about the main themes, what the author was trying to say (message of the short story), existensialism (the author was a friend and student of Kirkegaard) and the language/grammar used. In Norway we have to official languages, nynorsk and bokmål, while the short story was written in riksmål which later developed to bokmål. However there are some major differences in grammar, because bokmål has been influenced by nynorsk and then we talked about that for a while...
    for instance, in English you say
    the party
    while in bokmål you say
    den festen (party = fest).
    and in riksmål you would say
    den fest (which gramatically, I think is much more beautiful).
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    (Original post by RyanMan262)
    Pardon the sarcasm, then. If you don't have to, don't go line by line: you are constricting the structure (and therefore effectiveness) of your arguments to an order predetermined by the author, who will seldom develop her motif/metaphor/theme/etc. strictly chronologically. If you're stumped, then sure, looks like you'll have to plod through it. But come on, you're an IB student - if you can see the important elements of the passage, then why weaken your analysis by breaking it into parts according to lines? It doesn't make any sense to go line-by-line on principle: you're making it easier on your brain, but you're not making your commentary any better.

    I do agree with snark about the outline, and vavavoom about the colored pens. Yeah, maybe it's obvious, but who knows, maybe it'll help someone...

    And I believe my school had 32 extracts.
    I understand what you're saying but I still stick to the line by line method. Especially coz our veteran teacher recommends it to us. In all of the passages that were given to us the author developed a theme or idea chronologically, so if you jumped around all over the place you would have lost major points. Especially coz some of the possible poems we could get were by John Donne, and his brilliance in techinique lies in the fact that he presents logical arguments, line by line. You can score full marks using this method + it's easier for the brain as you said. Our whole class did it this way, including the most brilliant students (one going to Harvard).

    I used the same method for my Japanese Oral and scored 29/30, one point being subtracted from the fact that my grammer was a bit messed up. He said that he liked the fact I went line by line, and gave me full marks for structure.

    But if you can still create a brilliant commentary in 20 mins w/o going line by line I think that's great. Just remember that you can score full marks either way, and that anyone who hasn't done their commentary yet should go with the one they feel more comfertable with
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    hmmm...

    my ib english teacher (who is a 'veteran' too) warned us strictly against taking a linear approach. she said that its better to break things down by themes and ideas because it makes it for a more mature presentation. but hey, if your line by line approach got you full marks, then ignore everything i just said.

    and hey, i thought that it was some sort of ib rule that schools aren't allowed to include passages that have been previously studied/viewed by the students. it's supposed to be an unseen commentary. correct me if i'm wrong.

    i know this is a very very old thread but i was bored and digging around and soo yea.
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    (Original post by ckseven)
    hmmm...

    my ib english teacher (who is a 'veteran' too) warned us strictly against taking a linear approach. she said that its better to break things down by themes and ideas because it makes it for a more mature presentation. but hey, if your line by line approach got you full marks, then ignore everything i just said.

    and hey, i thought that it was some sort of ib rule that schools aren't allowed to include passages that have been previously studied/viewed by the students. it's supposed to be an unseen commentary. correct me if i'm wrong.

    i know this is a very very old thread but i was bored and digging around and soo yea.
    You must have been REALLY bored...:P
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    (Original post by stressed_:x)
    19 passages!??!?! NINETEEN?? thats a bit excessive isnt it? where are u studying IB? we only had like 9! Thats HL!
    we had 19 as well.. and we are onlz 20 in th class / as we thought wed get something that was alreadz chosen, we always got sth new!!

    Otherwise just make urself a schemata like

    First evaluate which of the following are the most meaningful for the interpretation of the poem or paragraph> STYLE, WHATS IT ABOUT, HOW IT IS BUILT

    STYLE... then tell everything about it
    then
    HOW ITS BUILT... everzthing boiut it
    WHATS IT ABOUT

    and tell exactly everything that u see, even if it is the most obvious, cuz the guy that will listen to the tape has no idea howmuch u kow. Relax. There is enough time for everything, just concentrate and dont cough straight in the microphone in case ull ahve to
 
 
 
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