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    What are the mature student colleges like in Cambridge? Has anyone been to them? I'm thinking of reapplying for MML for September 2005 as I will be 21 by then, and most normal colleges recommend that you apply to the mature colleges (St. Edmund & Wolfson) since the normal colleges hardly admit anyone over 21. However I'm worried that people at these colleges will be over 30 on average, and that therefore there will be absolutely no social life or fun in the college. Would it be easy to meet people from other colleges? I'm really keen on the course at Cambridge, but I don't want to go if it means living in an old people's home miles from the centre!
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    (Original post by Tipex-Mouse)
    What are the mature student colleges like in Cambridge? Has anyone been to them? I'm thinking of reapplying for MML for September 2005 as I will be 21 by then, and most normal colleges recommend that you apply to the mature colleges (St. Edmund & Wolfson) since the normal colleges hardly admit anyone over 21. However I'm worried that people at these colleges will be over 30 on average, and that therefore there will be absolutely no social life or fun in the college. Would it be easy to meet people from other colleges? I'm really keen on the course at Cambridge, but I don't want to go if it means living in an old people's home miles from the centre!
    I considered making an open application until I found out that, since I would be over 21, I would automatically be allocated to a "mature college". I too thought that since I would be a good deal nearer 20 than 30, I would feel more at home in a normal college, and I'm not sure that it is true that normal colleges hardly admits anyone over 21. I got an offer anyway.

    Good luck with you application whatever you decide to do!
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    There are 3 mature colleges that you can choose from, not including Lucy Cavendish since it is a female only college. Something you must consider is that you might be 21 when you matriculate but as the years go past you will change and become older so being amongst people your age is better than being in a college with 18 year olds. Mature colleges are specialists for the needs of a more mature student as they deal with people over 21.

    I will be studying at Hughes Hall this October, the reason why I chose this college is due to the features it provided me, this year they are inaugurating a new extension that will enable all students to live at the college grounds. They also provide a computer in each room with internet access for those who wish it; the food is commented to be amongst the best in Cambridge University.

    Although not as old as some of the undergraduate colleges, Hughes Hall is the oldest graduate college and it is built next to the cricket grounds and swimming baths.

    Social life won’t change, as most students are 21 to 28 and on that age I cannot see the fun diminishing. Also think about it, would you prefer going out with 18 year olds fresh out of college or going out with 21 to 28 year olds with life experience and same taste of things from back in the teenage days.
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    (Original post by Saintsin)
    There are 3 mature colleges that you can choose from, not including Lucy Cavendish since it is a female only college. Something you must consider is that you might be 21 when you matriculate but as the years go past you will change and become older so being amongst people your age is better than being in a college with 18 year olds. Mature colleges are specialists for the needs of a more mature student as they deal with people over 21.

    Social life won’t change, as most students are 21 to 28 and on that age I cannot see the fun diminishing. Also think about it, would you prefer going out with 18 year olds fresh out of college or going out with 21 to 28 year olds with life experience and same taste of things from back in the teenage days.
    Thanks, from what you say Hugh's Hall sounds interesting, I will definately investigate it. I had been under the impression that there were only two mixed mature colleges, I'm not sure why! What are you studying?
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    (Original post by Tipex-Mouse)
    Thanks, from what you say Hugh's Hall sounds interesting, I will definately investigate it. I had been under the impression that there were only two mixed mature colleges, I'm not sure why! What are you studying?
    Well I give my point of view about Hughes Hall, I cannot comment much from the other colleges facilities as I never been to them, the furthest I got with the other colleges are the initial phone call and college prospectus. I also found the Hughes Hall telephone staff where friendlier for some reason.

    The subject that I will be studying this October is Computer Science.
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    grad colleges seem to be much quieter than undergrad ones... and i'm quite sure "undergrad" colleges take mature students, considering as i'm one and i'm not in a grad college.

    as for the company, it really depends on who you like to mix with, and whether you are occasionally able to let go of your worldly-wise ways to engage in and enjoy the general undergrad tomfoolery that occurs... admittedly, conversation topics are somewhat different from "mature" conversations, but then again, it can be refreshingly interesting. besides, if you are so inclined, you can always hang out with the MCR/SCR crowd in your college - the grads are usually quite a nice bunch, if somewhat superannuated and if you get invited into the MCR, they are usually quite plush and have nifty things like free port... :eek:

    somehow, don't know where i get the impression from, but it always seems to me that undergrads in mature colleges surrounded by PhD and postgrad students must be quite lonely and sad... i'm sure they are happy where they are, but the situation always strikes me as less than ideal...
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    yeah, i dont think you have to worry too much about meeting people of the 'right age' since you'll meet a range of people on your course.

    i know a fair few people at st. ed's, and they're a fun bunch on the whole! I don't perceive them as being all that old (i'm only 20), I think its just a matter of who you get on with. Guest halls there are VERY yummy and they always seem to be having bops! Having the bar in the 'cupboard' is also quite a feature, as well as the free pool table!

    I don't know about the other mature colleges, but yes, if I was applying then I would definitely want to know the modal age group. I'm guessing this probably isnt too hard to find out. And you might actually find it worse to be in another college because the mature students don't tend to socialise that much with the undergrads anyway. It probably isnt all that fun trying to fit in with a bunch of 18 year old freshers!

    p.s. you won't be miles out from the centre going to any of the cambridge colleges - except girton!! (Which usually gets dismissed too quickly, as its a very pretty college and even has a swimming pool. It also holds an excellent Spring Ball!)
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    (Original post by Saintsin)
    There are 3 mature colleges that you can choose from, not including Lucy Cavendish since it is a female only college. Something you must consider is that you might be 21 when you matriculate but as the years go past you will change and become older so being amongst people your age is better than being in a college with 18 year olds. Mature colleges are specialists for the needs of a more mature student as they deal with people over 21.

    I will be studying at Hughes Hall this October, the reason why I chose this college is due to the features it provided me, this year they are inaugurating a new extension that will enable all students to live at the college grounds. They also provide a computer in each room with internet access for those who wish it; the food is commented to be amongst the best in Cambridge University.

    Although not as old as some of the undergraduate colleges, Hughes Hall is the oldest graduate college and it is built next to the cricket grounds and swimming baths.

    Social life won’t change, as most students are 21 to 28 and on that age I cannot see the fun diminishing. Also think about it, would you prefer going out with 18 year olds fresh out of college or going out with 21 to 28 year olds with life experience and same taste of things from back in the teenage days.
    You have to remember though that non-mature colleges will not consist entirely of 18 year olds fresh out of college. They have 20-3 year olds as well, namely those who entered when they wre 18-20 and are now in their second/third/fourth year. I agree that a 'mature' student (even when nearer to 20 than 30) might find it easier to bond with other people in their 20s than with people just out of school, but by the time the second/third year comes around these 'non-mature' students have already matured significantly.
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    Darwin has an extremely pretty stretch of riverbank: lovely place to start punting from. And it's bar opens til the early hours, on occasion!
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    (Original post by tommyboy)
    You have to remember though that non-mature colleges will not consist entirely of 18 year olds fresh out of college. They have 20-3 year olds as well, namely those who entered when they wre 18-20 and are now in their second/third/fourth year. I agree that a 'mature' student (even when nearer to 20 than 30) might find it easier to bond with other people in their 20s than with people just out of school, but by the time the second/third year comes around these 'non-mature' students have already matured significantly.
    Three year olds in a cam college? cool

    MB
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    Who knows... You know what I meant.
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    (Original post by Tipex-Mouse)
    What are the mature student colleges like in Cambridge? Has anyone been to them? I'm thinking of reapplying for MML for September 2005 as I will be 21 by then, and most normal colleges recommend that you apply to the mature colleges (St. Edmund & Wolfson) since the normal colleges hardly admit anyone over 21. However I'm worried that people at these colleges will be over 30 on average, and that therefore there will be absolutely no social life or fun in the college. Would it be easy to meet people from other colleges? I'm really keen on the course at Cambridge, but I don't want to go if it means living in an old people's home miles from the centre!
    Hey Tipex-Mouse,
    I have an offer from Wolfson, but now I have the same concerns as you! I really hadn't thought much about being around the PHd people.....now I seem to think my life will be a little boring (as the people I saw in the dining hall looked soooooooo dry), and I'll have to make such an effort to mix with undergrads at other colleges. I even considered declining the offer and reapplying the following year to another college. I think if you decide to apply to mature college and wish to meet [younger and more exciting?] people outside the college, you will need to be prepared to join lots of societies!! That's probably what I'll end up doing.

    I dont think it'll feel like an old people's home though, cos many people I saw at interview were just 21! Although I think I am a bit immature so I'd probably have done better to apply to a undergrad college!!!!

    Anyway, if you have the same concerns as me, I would suggest you apply to an undergrad college.
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    (Original post by Mentally Ill)
    Anyway, if you have the same concerns as me, I would suggest you apply to an undergrad college.
    Yeah, I've tried that already! Got rejected by St. John's, still considering giving it another crack, but not getting my hopes up too high.
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    I'm sure you'll find good social life wherever you go. Cambridge isn't big and I guess you can mix with students from other colleges if you wish.

    MB
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    (Original post by Tipex-Mouse)
    Yeah, I've tried that already! Got rejected by St. John's, still considering giving it another crack, but not getting my hopes up too high.
    In that case I think you should apply to a mature college. Although, I have heard that Johns are supposed to be very welcoming to mature students?? Moreso than even the grad colleges!

    Did you get any feedback from them?
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    (Original post by Mentally Ill)
    In that case I think you should apply to a mature college. Although, I have heard that Johns are supposed to be very welcoming to mature students?? Moreso than even the grad colleges!

    Did you get any feedback from them?
    No, I didn't receive a thing, very rude I thought. Shall I write to them to ask for some feedback?
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    (Original post by Tipex-Mouse)
    No, I didn't receive a thing, very rude I thought. Shall I write to them to ask for some feedback?

    Yes, I think you should demand some kind of feedback. I think you may have been overlooked because with under21s they normally write to the school (although I think the policy varies across colleges), and with mature students it would seemed silly to write to their college. I think you have to request it - although it may be a little late now??????
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    I think that, as an undergraduate, you will become less and less inclined to make friendships based on factors such as age, region, nationality, music taste etc. You will find yourself making friends with all kinds of people, hopefully... I think you should go for a mixed college.

    I figure you'll be fine wherever you go. Just get on with it... be yourself and don't aplogise for it. There are always good people around.
 
 
 

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