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    (Original post by Trousers)
    I don't think this was the point in the list. The point was that if you're allowed to do all these other adult things at 16, you should be able to vote too as you're an adult for all intents and purposes.

    I don't agree with this though - there has to be a boundary somewhere, and 18 is fine. The reason why the limits for things like age of consent are quite low is because higher limits don't work.

    If the age of consent for sex was 18, you'd still get plenty of 16 year olds doing it anyway and breaking the law. But under the current age restriction for voting, you don't get rebel kids turning up at polling stations. Young people don't vote that much anyway, so what's the point in lowering the age?
    I wont be able to vote in the general elections until I'm like twenty, but us rebel kids know how to get a couple of votes
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    (Original post by happysunshine)
    Exactly, 'decent', if you don't have a job and can't support yourself you should get any job.
    Sorry, but I don't agree. If you've got the experience, qualifications and talent to get a well-paid job you shouldn't have to do factory work or something similar because that's all you can get.

    If you've paid National Insurance and you'll be paying it (loads of it!) when you do find a good job, you should be able to claim JSA while you look for something. Jobhunting is often a full-time job in itself: it takes a lot of time and effort to do your research, fill out applications and attend interviews.

    I agree that some people don't try that hard, but all dole claimants shouldn't be tarred with the same brush.
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    (Original post by happysunshine)
    I wont be able to vote in the general elections until I'm like twenty
    :confused:

    Do you mean there is some reason that will prevent you from voting until you're 20 or do you just mean that the next general election wont happen until you're 20 - in which case there will still be plenty of local, european and bi-elections in the meantime.
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    (Original post by Trousers)
    Sorry, but I don't agree. If you've got the experience, qualifications and talent to get a well-paid job you shouldn't have to do factory work or something similar because that's all you can get.

    If you've paid National Insurance and you'll be paying it (loads of it!) when you do find a good job, you should be able to claim JSA while you look for something. Jobhunting is often a full-time job in itself: it takes a lot of time and effort to do your research, fill out applications and attend interviews.

    I agree that some people don't try that hard, but all dole claimants shouldn't be tarred with the same brush.
    Some don't try hard when unlike you they wont have good qualifications. And what annoys me more is those mothers who live off social security until their child ends their education and yet some do poor jobs of being good mothers.
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    (Original post by Pencil Queen)
    :confused:

    Do you mean there is some reason that will prevent you from voting until you're 20 or do you just mean that the next general election wont happen until you're 20 - in which case there will still be plenty of local, european and bi-elections in the meantime.
    The next general election wont happen until I'm twenty. Yup there are plenty of other things I can vote for but the general election is the most important to me and I'd like to actually be able to stand in the polling booth myself before the age of twenty.
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    (Original post by Trousers)
    Sorry, but I don't agree. If you've got the experience, qualifications and talent to get a well-paid job you shouldn't have to do factory work or something similar because that's all you can get.

    If you've paid National Insurance and you'll be paying it (loads of it!) when you do find a good job, you should be able to claim JSA while you look for something. Jobhunting is often a full-time job in itself: it takes a lot of time and effort to do your research, fill out applications and attend interviews.

    I agree that some people don't try that hard, but all dole claimants shouldn't be tarred with the same brush.
    Surely there must be limitations though. How long should reasonably be alllowed to get a "decent" job? How realistic are some people's ideas about what "decent" means given their personal abilities/standard of education etc?

    I think there should be a definate cut-off like there is in the US. Six months paid unemployment followed by starvation!
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    (Original post by angel D)
    do u think the age for voting should be lowered to 16 at 16 we can legally
    pay tax
    smoke
    have sex
    get a full time job
    finsish full time education
    join a union

    so should be be able to vote?
    no way! we will take the piss and all vote for something like green party
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    (Original post by angel D)
    do u think the age for voting should be lowered to 16 at 16 we can legally
    pay tax
    smoke
    have sex
    get a full time job
    finsish full time education
    join a union

    so should be be able to vote?
    no way! we will take the piss and all vote for something like green party
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    (Original post by TheWolf)
    no way! we will take the piss and all vote for something like green party
    And if they agree with what they would do with our country then let them vote.
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    I really don't know what the big rush is to vote at 16. Let's be honest now; you're bound to get pretty much the same performance from whichever party forms the administration so it really doesn't make a huge difference who you vote for anyway.
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    (Original post by happysunshine)
    And if they agree with what they would do with our country then let them vote.

    Basically you've just said "if they want to vote, then they should be able to vote". Which you know, is wrong.
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    (Original post by Amazing)
    Basically you've just said "if they want to vote, then they should be able to vote". Which you know, is wrong.
    No I don't. Tell me why it is wrong?
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    (Original post by happysunshine)
    The next general election wont happen until I'm twenty. Yup there are plenty of other things I can vote for but the general election is the most important to me and I'd like to actually be able to stand in the polling booth myself before the age of twenty.
    Could be worse - I was 4 months off my 18th birthday when the 1997 general election took place :mad:
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    (Original post by happysunshine)
    No I don't. Tell me why it is wrong?
    Saying that somebody should be able to do something solely because they want to do it is a bad argument, and doesn't work.
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    (Original post by happysunshine)
    And if they agree with what they would do with our country then let them vote.
    What he means is, people would vote for parties like the monster raving looney party because they have a funny name.

    Every party knows that to win the general election you have to appeal to the uneducated masses, in other words most 16 years olds wouldnt know what they are voting for.

    I believe if you voted your vote would be much worthier than over someone with no idea about politics but over 18. You actually have knowledge and understand concepts, I'd say more like someone of age 18-20, but in most cases within the country this is not the case.
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    (Original post by Joey_Johns)
    What he means is, people would vote for parties like the monster raving looney party because they have a funny name.

    Every party knows that to win the general election you have to appeal to the uneducated masses, in other words most 16 years olds wouldnt know what they are voting for.

    I believe if you voted your vote would be much worthier than over someone with no idea about politics but over 18. You actually have knowledge and understand concepts, I'd say more like someone of age 18-20, but in most cases within the country this is not the case.
    I know what he means and even if this was true of every sixteen year old it would not have a big effect.

    Whether 18-20 or 16 if people have no interest in politics they wont bother voting. Simple as that.
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    (Original post by happysunshine)
    I know what he means and even if this was true of every sixteen year old it would not have a big effect.

    Whether 18-20 or 16 if people have no interest in politics they wont bother voting. Simple as that.
    Not always the case. Most of my family dont give two hoots about politics including me but still vote because its the thing to do. The point is though the vast majority of people who vote dont have a clue about the parties policies etc including me to be honest, thats the problem.
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    (Original post by Joey_Johns)
    Not always the case. Most of my family dont give two hoots about politics including me but still vote because its the thing to do. The point is though the vast majority of people who vote dont have a clue about the parties policies etc including me to be honest, thats the problem.
    Yup that's probably true of most people (knowing lots in detail parties policies, that is) so letting sixteen year olds vote wouldn't be a problem.
    If anything it would inspire them to take a larger interest
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    (Original post by Joey_Johns)
    Not always the case. Most of my family dont give two hoots about politics including me but still vote because its the thing to do. The point is though the vast majority of people who vote dont have a clue about the parties policies etc including me to be honest, thats the problem.
    Well, we live in a democracy. Within the age restrictions etc, everyone should vote no matter what their political views and whether they're interested or not.

    The vast majority probably don't know much about politics, but there is still some reason why they tick one box rather than the other, and this reasoning should be taken into account when we choose a party to rule the country. If you're not happy about who you've voted for, do the research and make a better decision next time.
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    I believe that every person that lives in the United Kingdom is a member of our society and should have the rights to reflect this. We all have responsibilties as citizens of the UK and yet millions of people do not have the prime responsibilty - the responsibility to vote - for the simple reason that they are under the age of 18. It is our duty, to decide who governs our country - who makes the decisions which affect our lives.

    Its embarrassing looking at statistics which show the UK's election turnout (particularly local council and European elections) and it appals me to think that millions of people are entitled to voice their views on these crucial matters and they don't bother. It is an extremely poor arguement to suggest that 16 and 17 year olds do not have the maturity to make an informed decision and therefore they should be denied the right to vote - because many young people are more involved with politics than alot of adults are - and it is for these young people which I believe that the voting age should be lowered to 16. We should not try to discourage political participation amongst teenagers because they are Britain's future. It is absolutely vital to emphasis the importance of voting amongst younger people because turnout, year on year, is on the decline and the more apathetic the public get, the less representative our government will be.

    We all pay taxes whether we work or not - indirect taxes. Everyone who buys products usually pays VAT on whatever they buy. That means 17.5% of the money that goes on the majority of the goods we buy goes directly to the government and yet all those who are under the age of 18 don't get the opportunity to decide how they think this money should be spent.

    This does not mean to say that I belive every child and toddler too should be entitled to vote. As with anything, there needs to be a limit - and it is a fact that many younger teenagers and children are uninterested in politics; but I think this is partly to do with the fact that they are informed. With the introduction of citizenship lessons in schools, we should see more political awareness amongst younger people - I think that as this becomes more effective and more students because more politically aware, then the voting age could even be lowered further. My main concern however would be that very young children could easily be manipulated into voting for an appealing party with impractical policies.

    For anyone that can't be bothered to read that I think:
    1. Political awareness needs to increase
    2. The voting age should be lowered to 16
    3. Election turnout is far too low
    4. Many young people are engaged in politics and should not be denied the opportunity to vote
 
 
 

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