Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I couldn't agree with you more. I'll treat you to some rep.
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jammyd)
    Probably not as articulately as i'd like

    Well, 16 year olds will almost definitely be living at home, and would not have had to fend for themselves before. 16 year olds are too immature, and you could get the monster raving loony party elected. 16 year olds are still growing up, and most don't give a damn who gets elected. Kids might also copy whoever their friends voted for, and not have any political independence.

    You have listed a number of things you can do when you're 16, but thats it. You can do them but you may not.
    This applies to most of the British population, young and old.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Katie Heskins)
    I believe that every person that lives in the United Kingdom is a member of our society and should have the rights to reflect this. We all have responsibilties as citizens of the UK and yet millions of people do not have the prime responsibilty - the responsibility to vote - for the simple reason that they are under the age of 18. It is our duty, to decide who governs our country - who makes the decisions which affect our lives.

    Its embarrassing looking at statistics which show the UK's election turnout (particularly local council and European elections) and it appals me to think that millions of people are entitled to voice their views on these crucial matters and they don't bother. It is an extremely poor arguement to suggest that 16 and 17 year olds do not have the maturity to make an informed decision and therefore they should be denied the right to vote - because many young people are more involved with politics than alot of adults are - and it is for these young people which I believe that the voting age should be lowered to 16. We should not try to discourage political participation amongst teenagers because they are Britain's future. It is absolutely vital to emphasis the importance of voting amongst younger people because turnout, year on year, is on the decline and the more apathetic the public get, the less representative our government will be.

    We all pay taxes whether we work or not - indirect taxes. Everyone who buys products usually pays VAT on whatever they buy. That means 17.5% of the money that goes on the majority of the goods we buy goes directly to the government and yet all those who are under the age of 18 don't get the opportunity to decide how they think this money should be spent.

    This does not mean to say that I belive every child and toddler too should be entitled to vote. As with anything, there needs to be a limit - and it is a fact that many younger teenagers and children are uninterested in politics; but I think this is partly to do with the fact that they are informed. With the introduction of citizenship lessons in schools, we should see more political awareness amongst younger people - I think that as this becomes more effective and more students because more politically aware, then the voting age could even be lowered further. My main concern however would be that very young children could easily be manipulated into voting for an appealing party with impractical policies.

    For anyone that can't be bothered to read that I think:
    1. Political awareness needs to increase
    2. The voting age should be lowered to 16
    3. Election turnout is far too low
    4. Many young people are engaged in politics and should not be denied the opportunity to vote
    Some good points.

    The main thing I'd disagree with is your reference to "voter apathy" This is just an effect. The cause of course is "politician apathy" If the politicians had an original idea in their heads and actually managed to convey that message I'm sure turnout would increase.

    The simple fact is that

    "if you vote us (labor) we'll promise you more of the same" but

    "if you vote us (tory) we'll provide something similar" and

    "if you vote for us (lib dem) we'll match anything labor or the tory party can do by "putting a penny on the pound" for education/health/transport etc"

    Who can blame the electorate for falling asleep?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Howard)
    Some good points.

    The main thing I'd disagree with is your reference to "voter apathy" This is just an effect. The cause of course is "politician apathy" If the politicians had an original idea in their heads and actually managed to convey that message I'm sure turnout would increase.

    The simple fact is that

    "if you vote us (labor) we'll promise you more of the same" but

    "if you vote us (tory) we'll provide something similar" and

    "if you vote for us (lib dem) we'll match anything labor or the tory party can do by "putting a penny on the pound" for education/health/transport etc"

    Who can blame the electorate for falling asleep?
    oh yes I'm not saying the public are completely to blame for being apathetic towards politics - its certainly a 2way breakdown. but I think if you've go voting rights, then you should make the effort to understand what huge implications this has and not merely ignore something on the basis of it appearning 'boring'.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Katie Heskins)
    oh yes I'm not saying the public are completely to blame for being apathetic towards politics - its certainly a 2way breakdown. but I think if you've go voting rights, then you should make the effort to understand what huge implications this has and not merely ignore something on the basis of it appearning 'boring'.
    How about another way then? How about making it harder, not easier, to qualify to vote? That would giving the right to vote some value.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I think lowering the voting age would be a mistake to be honest.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    lowering the voting age would be a huge mistake:
    1. because at the age of 16, MOST people wouldn't bother researching into the elections and would vote for whoever they thought looked the best etc (another kennedy case, my grandmother voted for him because he was attractive)
    2. there's no reason because they arent legal adults yet so most issues dont directly effect them (not to say they arent affected by things like war) like taxes!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I think it's also important to be pragmatic about this as well. I believe that it would be fair to say that if the voting age was lowered to 16 then the voter turnout amoung 16-18 year olds would be around 25%, on the basis that about 40% of 18-24 year olds vote. If you then consider that of those 25%, half of them will probably be voting just for the novelty value, or doing it with their friends, you will then realise that the end result will be a wildly unrepresentative portrayal of the politics of 16/17 year olds. Consequently, only the opinions of the most politically aware 16-18 year olds will be considered, and the vast majority will be completely overlooked.

    I believe that it is a very worrying sign whenever turnout is below 50%; it takes a great deal of legitimacy away from the elected body and (correctly) gives the apathetic the right to question the authority of a body which is not even representative of the majority of people it is intended to serve.

    For that very good reason, I do not believe it is in the interests of teenagers to be given suffrage when their collective opinion will not be accurately reflected. I am not sure how I stand on this 'morally', whether or not I would support lowering the age if it was obvious that the majority would vote. I think that I would probably still be against it. However, not only is it certain that turnout would be extraordinary low, but I do not believe it is a realistic prospect to ever hypthesise that it could reach 50%.

    While at first it might sound perverse, if you consider my points I hope that you would agree that it would actually be undemocratic to give voting rights to 16/17 year olds for as long as the results reflect only a minority of the population.

    Either way, I encourage you to respond!

    Tom
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    no and i never plan on using my vote anywayz
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    You should not be allowed to vote or taxed until you are eighteen- you just aren't mature enough to make a responsible decision.

    Having said that, I doubt there is any point in arguing about it because all the political parties are stagnated, and many of the members sycophantic, corrupt and very boring.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by vertago)
    [FONT=arial]lowering the voting age would be a huge mistake:
    1. because at the age of 16, MOST people wouldn't bother researching into the elections and would vote for whoever they thought looked the best etc (another kennedy case, my grandmother voted for him because he was attractive)
    Only 1/4 of 16 year olds in four years would be able to vote. Meaning half would be over 18 when they actually vote.

    Which is a plus point of lowering the voting age.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Katie Heskins)
    Its embarrassing looking at statistics which show the UK's election turnout (particularly local council and European elections) and it appals me to think that millions of people are entitled to voice their views on these crucial matters and they don't bother. It is an extremely poor arguement to suggest that 16 and 17 year olds do not have the maturity to make an informed decision and therefore they should be denied the right to vote - because many young people are more involved with politics than alot of adults are - and it is for these young people which I believe that the voting age should be lowered to 16. We should not try to discourage political participation amongst teenagers because they are Britain's future. It is absolutely vital to emphasis the importance of voting amongst younger people because turnout, year on year, is on the decline and the more apathetic the public get, the less representative our government will be.
    First of all, you have a few problems in that argument it is agreed among phesologists that the bracket of 18-24 year olds have very little interest in politics. It is seen than someone of 60+ is 5x more likely to than those of 18-24 year olds. Therefore the argument that those younger than 16 are interested more than current voters hence should be given the vote is flawed.
    People realise that they voting is important, but lowering the age to 16 is not going to solve anything because the young feel they are not represented they feel 'lectured to' not 'listened to'. So until some good political awareness amongst young adults is instigated then lowering the voting age will just encourage further apathy and even less legitmacy in our democracy.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by happysunshine)
    Only 1/4 of 16 year olds in four years would be able to vote. Meaning half would be over 18 when they actually vote.

    Which is a plus point of lowering the voting age.
    Ag, not really. The same could be said about almost 16 year olds which cannot vote if the voting age was lowered.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Joey_Johns)
    Ag, not really. The same could be said about almost 16 year olds which cannot vote if the voting age was lowered.
    So it still makes it quicker in a lot of cases.

    I'm not going to be able to vote until I'm twenty-one but if the voting age was lowered I'd be able to vote in the next general election.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tomhitchings)
    While at first it might sound perverse, if you consider my points I hope that you would agree that it would actually be undemocratic to give voting rights to 16/17 year olds for as long as the results reflect only a minority of the population.

    Either way, I encourage you to respond!

    Tom
    I agree it would drive legitmacy away from our democracy. However, this issue is present throughout the electorate with turnout at 50% for the last general election.

    What needs to be done before 16/17 year olds can get the vote is an increase in political awareness and I think this can be done in a number of ways.

    1) Citizenship / Politics lessons
    2) Politicians appealing and listening to younger viewpoints
    3) Less MP straight jacket effect so politics becomes more interesting
    4) Greater information on the young and major policy issues that will directly affect them
    5) Less Jargon and 'boredom' from politics but exciting campaigns will clear explainations of what politicians mean

    Obviously this is quite idealistic however, until a generation of mainly political aware youngsters come through the vote cannot be given as it would be against democracy.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by corey)
    I agree it would drive legitmacy away from our democracy. However, this issue is present throughout the electorate with turnout at 50% for the last general election.

    What needs to be done before 16/17 year olds can get the vote is an increase in political awareness and I think this can be done in a number of ways.

    1) Citizenship / Politics lessons
    2) Politicians appealing and listening to younger viewpoints
    3) Less MP straight jacket effect so politics becomes more interesting
    4) Greater information on the young and major policy issues that will directly affect them
    5) Less Jargon and 'boredom' from politics but exciting campaigns will clear explainations of what politicians mean

    Obviously this is quite idealistic however, until a generation of mainly political aware youngsters come through the vote cannot be given as it would be against democracy.
    A very bright person my age didn't even know who Michael Howard is!
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by happysunshine)
    So it still makes it quicker in a lot of cases.

    I'm not going to be able to vote until I'm twenty-one but if the voting age was lowered I'd be able to vote in the next general election.
    It was 20 yesterday lol!

    Hmm, well thats just tough luck I guess. Its not a big deal anyway, you will have plenty of chances to vote after that...

    I'll be 20 when the next general election happens so i'm in the same boat as you really, never bothered me much though.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by happysunshine)
    A very bright person my age didn't even know who Michael Howard is!
    Well he is a joke anyway
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Joey_Johns)
    It was 20 yesterday lol!

    Hmm, well thats just tough luck I guess. Its not a big deal anyway, you will have plenty of chances to vote after that...

    I'll be 20 when the next general election happens so i'm in the same boat as you really, never bothered me much though.
    huh? You can vote in the next general election then...therefore are not in the same boat!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Joey_Johns)
    It was 20 yesterday lol!

    Hmm, well thats just tough luck I guess. Its not a big deal anyway, you will have plenty of chances to vote after that...

    I'll be 20 when the next general election happens so i'm in the same boat as you really, never bothered me much though.
    LOL... twenty was an estimate... it is twenty one.

    Well one little vote wont make much difference. But I'm telling a couple of people to vote for who I say
 
 
 
Poll
“Yanny” or “Laurel”
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.