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    What's the difference between kinetic and thermodynamic stability?

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    (Original post by wigman15)
    What's the difference between kinetic and thermodynamic stability?

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    kinetic stability (in chemistry i assume) is when there are two reagents together, but they do not have the required activation energy to react, so they will not react. for example, magnesium in air wont burn, but if it is set alight (i.e. enough energy is supplied) it will react.

    thermodynamic stability is if two reagents are together but they wont react because they are already at their lowest energy levels wrt each other. for example, nitrogen will not decompose because it is already at its elemental level.
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    Thanks for your help elpaw.

    I now understand kinetic stability but I still do not understand thermodynamic stability. Could you please break it down a bit more for me.

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    (Original post by wigman15)
    Thanks for your help elpaw.

    I now understand kinetic stability but I still do not understand thermodynamic stability. Could you please break it down a bit more for me.

    Thanks
    thermodynamic stability is basically whether the reaction is exothermic or endothermic. if a reaction is endothermic, its reagents are thermodynamically stable. (sorry, i was a bit vague in my original explanation)
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    Thanks...i get it!
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    (Original post by elpaw)
    kinetic stability (in chemistry i assume) is when there are two reagents together, but they do not have the required activation energy to react, so they will not react. for example, magnesium in air wont burn, but if it is set alight (i.e. enough energy is supplied) it will react.

    thermodynamic stability is if two reagents are together but they wont react because they are already at their lowest energy levels wrt each other. for example, nitrogen will not decompose because it is already at its elemental level.
    What about when the reagents are allowed to reach equilibrium - this shows thermodynamic stability, does it not? Is stability really all about not reacting? Products are frequently more 'stable' than reactants - reactions may not go otherwise!

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    thanku that really helped me aswell looked all ova the net 4 it cudnt find it anywhere cheers
 
 
 

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