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    (Original post by ABCD)
    look at one of the top investment bank's websites, and look at the profiles, which one of these people have got a degree in Marketing? from my memory - none, most have economics degree or joint economics degree.
    Yeahhh, although I think that say's more about your memory, lol.

    Go to the Morgan Stanley site, you see people there from a diverse range of fields. I'm not disputing that there are more economics students, although that could just be as they prefer IB over other careers such as Management Consulting, for instance. However, another reason could just be that there aren't so many highly regarded Management courses in the UK, LSE of course being a huge exception-alongside a few others.
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    (Original post by J.S.)
    Yeahhh, although I think that say's more about your memory, lol.

    Go to the Morgan Stanley site, you see people there from a diverse range of fields. I'm not disputing that there are more economics students, although that could just be as they prefer IB over other careers such as Management Consulting, for instance. However, another reason could just be that there aren't so many highly regarded Management courses in the UK, LSE of course being a huge exception-alongside a few others.
    could u name the 'few others' pls?
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    (Original post by wonkey)
    could u name the 'few others' pls?

    er....at undergraduate level the other Managament courses that come straight to mind are EM at Oxford, and various courses at Warwick Business School. There must be a few others, I know Manchester Biz School is also highly regarded.

    At Graduate level there's Judge Institute at Cambridge, LBS, LSE, Oxford, Warwick. Again, this is just what I can think of, no idea about the rest!
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    (Original post by Mysticmin)
    At the end of the day it's all up to you, and I'm not clear on how well management BA is respected.

    Saying that though, what analytical skills does a degree in management sciences provide you? You'll need to write reports when you're an investment banking novice, to help your boss decide where to invest.

    Several years later, if you are successful, the bank will send you to do an MBA, because afterwards you'll be elevated to associate position, where you'll need team management skills.

    LSE does have an amazing reputation but if you did a less respected degree from there, will it give you any advantage in the job market at all?
    This is wrong. Employers look at the university you went to: the exact course only makes a marginal difference, all else being equal. Truth is LSE is much better known than anybody outside Oxbridge and its A Level entry grades are very close to those of Oxbridge-and employers do look at entry grades-UCL however has lower entry grades than you'd expect, fine college though it is...
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    (Original post by W.A.S Hewins)
    This is wrong. Employers look at the university you went to: the exact course only makes a marginal difference, all else being equal. Truth is LSE is much better known than anybody outside Oxbridge and its A Level entry grades are very close to those of Oxbridge-and employers do look at entry grades-UCL however has lower entry grades than you'd expect, fine college though it is...
    the overall entry grades for UCL is lower than LSE....yes
    but for econ related courses in UCL it's at least AAB which is v.high....wouldn't the employers take note of that? if one did LSE Anthopology, another did UCL Econ & Stat and both applied for a job in a bank, would the uni name really dominate the prospects of the two?
    no offence this might be a very silly question, but i just got rejected from LSE for A&F and might go to UCL for E&S....really concerned about job prospects....feeling really(x 1000) unhappy at the moment, haven't felt like that before in my life.
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    (Original post by zaherrrrr)
    Are you sure that u can change courses in LSE?, last i heard is that they dont let u change!..
    Uni has no reason to make you study a course that you dont like.

    Even Oxbridge will let you change it. I know it cos I asked.

    Just talk to your tutor in Uni after couple of weeks and say you hate the course. They ll let you change.
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    (Original post by CaSTle OUtsiDeR)
    the overall entry grades for UCL is lower than LSE....yes
    but for econ related courses in UCL it's at least AAB which is v.high....wouldn't the employers take note of that? if one did LSE Anthopology, another did UCL Econ & Stat and both applied for a job in a bank, would the uni name really dominate the prospects of the two?
    no offence this might be a very silly question, but i just got rejected from LSE for A&F and might go to UCL for E&S....really concerned about job prospects....feeling really(x 1000) unhappy at the moment, haven't felt like that before in my life.
    Not a silly question, i was concerned about job prospects becuase i got rejected from LSE for eco and cambridge for eco. I don't how how far a UCL degree pushes you with potential bank employers.

    The City is still old school from the sounds of it, can anyone confirm/veto this? My economics teacher told me that. If a UCL degree doesn't cut me any slack i'd rather take a gap year and reapply.
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    (Original post by Mysticmin)
    Not a silly question, i was concerned about job prospects becuase i got rejected from LSE for eco and cambridge for eco. I don't how how far a UCL degree pushes you with potential bank employers.

    The City is still old school from the sounds of it, can anyone confirm/veto this? My economics teacher told me that. If a UCL degree doesn't cut me any slack i'd rather take a gap year and reapply.

    Ohhhhh , you're worrying for absolutely no reason. You are NOT your degree, I'm sure there is far more to you than UCL Economics, cmon! Your uni/degree is only enough to get you an interview, from thereon the skills you've developed over the 3 years are going to be looked at. Providing you have a good degree classification, a good range of extra curricula activities you WILL get an interview, believe me-I've been through it many times! Whether you attend Notts, Warwick, UCL, LSE, Bristol, if you meet the criteria it will be enough to get an interview, and from there you're on your own.

    That's it, as I've said you are *NOT* your degree, employers are interesting in what you've studied, where you've studied and how well you've done, *but* they're broadminded (after all the intention is to max. profit, surely they're not as stupid as to eliminate a wide range of people who are likely to make them a great deal of money!!!!).

    Stop worrying, go there, study hard and make sure you take a good deal of advice from people who’ve already filled out the respective app. forms and have been able to secure interviews. Also, stop listening to advice from 6th formers who’ve no experience in the grad. employment market!
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    (Original post by J.S.)
    Ohhhhh , you're worrying for absolutely no reason. You are NOT your degree, I'm sure there is far more to you than UCL Economics, cmon! Your uni/degree is only enough to get you an interview, from thereon the skills you've developed over the 3 years are going to be looked at. Providing you have a good degree classification, a good range of extra curricula activities you WILL get an interview, believe me-I've been through it many times! Whether you attend Notts, Warwick, UCL, LSE, Bristol, if you meet the criteria it will be enough to get an interview, and from there you're on your own.

    That's it, as I've said you are *NOT* your degree, employers are interesting in what you've studied, where you've studied and how well you've done, *but* they're broadminded (after all the intention is to max. profit, surely they're not as stupid as to eliminate a wide range of people who are likely to make them a great deal of money!!!!).

    Stop worrying, go there, study hard and make sure you take a good deal of advice from people who’ve already filled out the respective app. forms and have been able to secure interviews. Also, stop listening to advice from 6th formers who’ve no experience in the grad. employment market!
    Ok note to self: must stop listening to sixth formers. What do you do JS?
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    You are worrying unnecessarily. UCL is one of the best regarded unis amongst employers, and a good application form and solid grades from UCL will guarantee job interviews. My own bro studied at UCL and had no trouble getting interviews and is now working in the City.

    This whole lower entry requirements/A level grades thing makes for an unfair comparison with LSE. Courses like Law, Econ, English at UCL have entry requirements that are highly rigorous, but as UCL is committed to being a multi-faculty uni who does lots of obscure courses, their overall entry requirement is of course, dragged down.

    It’s so short-sighted of 6th formers to just look at league tables from the last few years, and treat that as gospel. Your employers probably regard UCL on the same sort of footing as LSE as that was the case when they were young.
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    (Original post by lyd)
    You are worrying unnecessarily. UCL is one of the best regarded unis amongst employers, and a good application form and solid grades from UCL will guarantee job interviews. My own bro studied at UCL and had no trouble getting interviews and is now working in the City.

    This whole lower entry requirements/A level grades thing makes for an unfair comparison with LSE. Courses like Law, Econ, English at UCL have entry requirements that are highly rigorous, but as UCL is committed to being a multi-faculty uni who does lots of obscure courses, their overall entry requirement is of course, dragged down.

    It’s so short-sighted of 6th formers to just look at league tables from the last few years, and treat that as gospel. Your employers probably regard UCL on the same sort of footing as LSE as that was the case when they were young.
    well said :cool:
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    cheers for ur advice everyone but this discussion is kinda turning into a UCL LSE entry requirement difference discussion. From allt he advice everyone's given me im still not sure whether i shud go for lse management sciences or ucl mathematics with economics. The ucl course does not come under the economics dept but under the methematics dept at ucl. a few people have mentioned thast you can change ur course after you go into the uni but from what i know you can only chnage within ur dept and managemt sciences comes under operational reserahc dept, and as far as i know the only degree int hat dept is managemtn sciences so you cannot change.The ucl degree is 75% mathematics and 25% economics
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    (Original post by princess)
    cheers for ur advice everyone but this discussion is kinda turning into a UCL LSE entry requirement difference discussion. From allt he advice everyone's given me im still not sure whether i shud go for lse management sciences or ucl mathematics with economics. The ucl course does not come under the economics dept but under the methematics dept at ucl. a few people have mentioned thast you can change ur course after you go into the uni but from what i know you can only chnage within ur dept and managemt sciences comes under operational reserahc dept, and as far as i know the only degree int hat dept is managemtn sciences so you cannot change.The ucl degree is 75% mathematics and 25% economics
    never apply for a course thinking that you can change subject
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    no i wasnt going to
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    I'm a first year student at UCL studying Maths with Econ, all I can say is DON'T DO IT! I had offers from LSE and Imperial but turned them down for UCL, which although is a wicked place to be, my course is absolute rubbish. The Economics Dept at UCL is top notch, don't get me wrong, but the Maths dept is awful, which is where u'd be spending most of your time. As for Princess go for LSE Management, its such an employable degree to have! granted you probably won't meet such a diverse range of ppl at LSE but the degree will probably stand u in better stead, and will probably be a lot easier as maths is pretty tough and BORING AS hell!
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    (Original post by J.S.)
    I don't think this is particularly good advice. I'm not going to suggest either way, as this is a decision that you're going to have to make. However, LSE Management is one of the most marketable degrees in the UK if you're looking to work in the City, without doubt. The people on this course seem to do incredibly well, quite a few go into the top IB's as well as the large accounting firms. To suggest it isn't so highly regarded by employers is laughable, literally.

    How is the LSE BSc in 'Actuarial Science' regarded as in the professional and business world. What about the value and respect of the BSc degree in 'Business Mathematics and Statistics' from LSE?
    How about Imperial's BSc in 'Mathematics and Computer Science'.
    Finally, which of the above would be better (the degree and the uni) in all aspects, reputation, name and everything.
    Thanks!

    P.S. Soviez, I know have asked this question earlier, but... please help...
 
 
 
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