AQA LITB3 Element of the Gothic Watch

mandem2k11
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How is everyone revising for this exam? Im studying Frankenstein, Wuthering heights and Dr Faustus
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Hal.E.Lujah
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(Original post by mandem2k11)
How is everyone revising for this exam? Im studying Frankenstein, Wuthering heights and Dr Faustus

What in particular were you having an issue with? If you want to discuss some of the points you'll be making I'm very familiar with the texts
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mandem2k11
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(Original post by Hal.E.Lujah)
What in particular were you having an issue with? If you want to discuss some of the points you'll be making I'm very familiar with the texts

Just struggling with the best way to go about revising for and succceeding in this exam! What would you recommend?
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Hal.E.Lujah
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(Original post by mandem2k11)
Just struggling with the best way to go about revising for and succceeding in this exam! What would you recommend?

Hmmm...


Step 1: Read some articles and opinions on the books
Step 2: Reread the books and memorise quotes from them
Step 3: Write a practice essay and post it on here for review
Step 4: Get a good nights sleep before exam and have a good breakfast
Step the last: Ace your exam
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mandem2k11
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(Original post by Hal.E.Lujah)
Hmmm...


Step 1: Read some articles and opinions on the books
Step 2: Reread the books and memorise quotes from them
Step 3: Write a practice essay and post it on here for review
Step 4: Get a good nights sleep before exam and have a good breakfast
Step the last: Ace your exam
Also, in terms of meeting the Assesement objectives, how would you recommend meeting each of them individually?

and am i right in saying all questions are marked on AO1,AO2,AO3 and AO4?

im struggling to understand how to get the AO3 and AO4 marks
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Hal.E.Lujah
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(Original post by mandem2k11)
Also, in terms of meeting the Assesement objectives, how would you recommend meeting each of them individually?

and am i right in saying all questions are marked on AO1,AO2,AO3 and AO4?

im struggling to understand how to get the AO3 and AO4 marks

Once you've got some further reading down, practice it. I can't give you advice because I don't know anything about your writing style

Post it on here and people can try and help refine it.
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mandem2k11
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(Original post by Hal.E.Lujah)
Once you've got some further reading down, practice it. I can't give you advice because I don't know anything about your writing style

Post it on here and people can try and help refine it.
how many quotes would you recommend memorising per book? ive currently made a list of 50 for each book but that seems to be a bit too much
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zakkaz
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Im doing this exam in June but our teacher tells us to read the books and know them inside out but in terms of quote even a one word quote can be sufficient in places. My favourite Wuthering Heights quote is "devil daddy" and that's just 2 words.

If you need any further help check out this site:
a2englit.wordpress.com

Especially if you study Wuthering Heights, Faustus or Bloody Chamber
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mandem2k11
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(Original post by zakkaz)
Im doing this exam in June but our teacher tells us to read the books and know them inside out but in terms of quote even a one word quote can be sufficient in places. My favourite Wuthering Heights quote is "devil daddy" and that's just 2 words.

If you need any further help check out this site:
a2englit.wordpress.com

Especially if you study Wuthering Heights, Faustus or Bloody Chamber
ok thanks have u got an idea of the amount of quotes one should learn per book if that makes sense?
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zakkaz
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I'm no expert in this exam I haven't even looked at section b, here's my advice for section B

I'm not sure there's a specific number you should learn. But you should try and learn quite versatile and memorable quotes. For example, quotes which tell you something significant about: a character, setting, how they link with the Gothic. These types of quotes can be manipulated, to fit many questions. The quotes will be second nature if you know the texts really well.

Remember in section a:

Attack the question, decide whether you agree with the statement or not and make it very clear what side you are on.

You should start with the argument for the statement whether you agree or not.

Make you structure clear. By choosing between:

Agree
Agree
Agree
Disagree

or

Agree
Disagree
Disagree
Disagree

Using critics quotes to develop your response is great but remember most questions will ask for your opinion so give it to them. One examiner specifically argued that critics responses show wider knowledge and understanding but students get more marks for quoting a critic and disagreeing with them and explaining why.

For context don't just stick a chunk of biographical info that is partially relevant this will give you little marks, try weaving in context into your argument to make it stronger.

Don't:
E.g. In the 1970s the pill gave women sexual freedom this idea of sexual freedom is explored by Carter in 'The Tiger's Bride'

Do:
E.g. The use of the gothic convention of metamorphosis in 'The Tiger's Bride' could be seen as an expression of sexual liberation much like how the pill at the time gave women sexual freedom.


Finally, if the questions asks whether you agree or disagree, making it very clear by using the words from the question. I agree with the statement, I believe that this view is plausible to a high extent...

Answer the question, and all of the question.

Finish off on a high, perhaps with a quote from the text or a critics quote. Don't be boring. Good LUCK!
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feelinginfinite
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Has anybody got predictions on what section B questions could be / been given predictions by their teachers? From looking at what's already came up
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TheStudent.
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What I did was I chose one text to study in depth - being The bloody chamber. I tried to make sure I was fully prepared for any question that they would throw at me in Section A. I knew about 2-3 opinions from different critic's for each story from using a website called gradesaver (I think), and in terms of A04, I just went over such things like the time period it was written in, and tried to link it back to Feminism like the Suffragettes/Suffragists.

For the other two texts, I made bullet points of short points I could talk about that covers a variety of themes. You only have 20 minutes to talk about each text in Section B, so try and keep that in mind when studying.
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conorog
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(Original post by TheStudent.)
What I did was I chose one text to study in depth - being The bloody chamber. I tried to make sure I was fully prepared for any question that they would throw at me in Section A. I knew about 2-3 opinions from different critic's for each story from using a website called gradesaver (I think), and in terms of A04, I just went over such things like the time period it was written in, and tried to link it back to Feminism like the Suffragettes/Suffragists.

For the other two texts, I made bullet points of short points I could talk about that covers a variety of themes. You only have 20 minutes to talk about each text in Section B, so try and keep that in mind when studying.
What grade did you achieve may i ask ?
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laulau-
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How do you revise for an English exam? Never quite been able to grasp this. No matter how many hours I sit reading the texts (Macbeth, Wuthering Heights, The Bloody Chamber) I still feel like I'm not really doing much!

I've focused on quotes, critical viewpoints, context.

Does anyone have any advice on what else I could try to make it feel like I'm really doing anything!

Starting to get mega stressed out!
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jumblehunter
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I always reread the books, make a list of usefull quotes, write a few practice essays and reread the ones I've already written in class, borrow essays off other people for topics I'm struggling/dont have time to write essays on, and write out essay plans when I don't have time to write a whole essay. If anyone wants me to look at a Macbeth/Wuthering Heights/ Pardoner's Tale essay I'll be glad to help.
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Sha_15
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How would I 'explore', 'analyse', and 'evaluate'?

I'm mainly stumped on how to do these three ?
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AlexTass100
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The best way I find to revise any exam with open answers is to look over past A* exam answers. That's what I've been doing for this exam particularly, and it's helping majorly. You cannot access them off AQA's website, but if you can ask any teacher to log in and do it for you.

The answers' I've seen that do best often start with a short, concise intro that summarises their entire argument. Quotations are not whole, and often interspersed between sentences (I realise I am reciting common knowledge here).
Conversely, other answers go straight into their first point. As long as your introductory point quite literally references how it is answering the question then I assume you will receive marks.

Character analysis seems to be key in this exam for they bring out a lot of the key themes and constructs that will be talked about later in the essay. This can be anything from Macbeth's 'vaulting ambition' representing man's diabolical lust for power, the violation of God in 'Frankenstein' (artificial creation of life), and the vampire women in 'Dracula' as a representation of the danger of sexual freedom in females (ref. New Woman Movement). This is contextual analysis as well as actual analysis, so most times you can hit two birds with one stone, show that you know the text inside out and never talk in generalities- if you are referencing a certain event in the narrative describe what happens, and how that embodies your point. What does it represent? What are the author's intentions?

Quoting a critic's opinion often helps, as long as you subsequently disagree or agree with it. This is evaluation. Since a lot of the questions are based on opinion, this is likely where you will find most assistance, because the opinions are pre-made and you just have to justify why, with textual reference, you agree or disagree. This shows not only background reading into other viewpoints but also shows you can justify your own similar or dissimilar opinion.

If your introduction has explained to-the-letter why your answer is going to answer you question, you may not need a conclusion as a separate paragraph. As long as your last paragraph's point is a coherent answer that rounds off its point. If you have gone into your first point immediately, then it is often wiser to do a conclusion, so as to show why your points have effectively answered the question. I believe this is merely about preference.

Common questions are often where I become stumped, because there are literally so many possibilities. However, those doing Jan 13 like me should know that questions concerning 'warning against the dangers of ambition', 'macbeth and concealment', 'death seen as desirable in Dracula', 'Frankenstein's monster as his 'doppelganger', 'obsession being a significant element' and 'gothic villains making evil seem attractive' are likely NOT to come up, as these were June 2012s questions. However, do not rule them out; transgression, obsessions, and ambition recur in some shape or form.

Religion, the 'shocking nature' of the Gothic, 'Good vs. Evil, where Evil is victorious' are also common themes played in both A and B sections of the questions.

To those who are particularly pedantic, I do realise I am just re-iterating what has already been said. But I have tried to make it as simple-to-answer as possible. I myself will be doing the exam for the second time (I derp'd heavily the first time), but I have done great research into doing well on it. I'm doing it for those whose questions go un-answered and hopefully this provides a little more light into this annoying exam.
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ChildishGambino
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(Original post by AlexTass100)
The best way I find to revise any exam with open answers is to look over past A* exam answers. That's what I've been doing for this exam particularly, and it's helping majorly. You cannot access them off AQA's website, but if you can ask any teacher to log in and do it for you.

The answers' I've seen that do best often start with a short, concise intro that summarises their entire argument. Quotations are not whole, and often interspersed between sentences (I realise I am reciting common knowledge here).
Conversely, other answers go straight into their first point. As long as your introductory point quite literally references how it is answering the question then I assume you will receive marks.

Character analysis seems to be key in this exam for they bring out a lot of the key themes and constructs that will be talked about later in the essay. This can be anything from Macbeth's 'vaulting ambition' representing man's diabolical lust for power, the violation of God in 'Frankenstein' (artificial creation of life), and the vampire women in 'Dracula' as a representation of the danger of sexual freedom in females (ref. New Woman Movement). This is contextual analysis as well as actual analysis, so most times you can hit two birds with one stone, show that you know the text inside out and never talk in generalities- if you are referencing a certain event in the narrative describe what happens, and how that embodies your point. What does it represent? What are the author's intentions?

Quoting a critic's opinion often helps, as long as you subsequently disagree or agree with it. This is evaluation. Since a lot of the questions are based on opinion, this is likely where you will find most assistance, because the opinions are pre-made and you just have to justify why, with textual reference, you agree or disagree. This shows not only background reading into other viewpoints but also shows you can justify your own similar or dissimilar opinion.

If your introduction has explained to-the-letter why your answer is going to answer you question, you may not need a conclusion as a separate paragraph. As long as your last paragraph's point is a coherent answer that rounds off its point. If you have gone into your first point immediately, then it is often wiser to do a conclusion, so as to show why your points have effectively answered the question. I believe this is merely about preference.

Common questions are often where I become stumped, because there are literally so many possibilities. However, those doing Jan 13 like me should know that questions concerning 'warning against the dangers of ambition', 'macbeth and concealment', 'death seen as desirable in Dracula', 'Frankenstein's monster as his 'doppelganger', 'obsession being a significant element' and 'gothic villains making evil seem attractive' are likely NOT to come up, as these were June 2012s questions. However, do not rule them out; transgression, obsessions, and ambition recur in some shape or form.

Religion, the 'shocking nature' of the Gothic, 'Good vs. Evil, where Evil is victorious' are also common themes played in both A and B sections of the questions.

To those who are particularly pedantic, I do realise I am just re-iterating what has already been said. But I have tried to make it as simple-to-answer as possible. I myself will be doing the exam for the second time (I derp'd heavily the first time), but I have done great research into doing well on it. I'm doing it for those whose questions go un-answered and hopefully this provides a little more light into this annoying exam.
I thought I was ready and then I read this. I'm hoping for an A* so this has been so useful, common sense isn't that common and in the stress of revising for an exam, I have forgotten most of the obvious things. Ahh thank you!

I think Frankenstein questions are just unpredictable, the year it focused on the Freudian oedipal complex threw me but I'm still hoping I can do Frankenstein for Section A. Do you have the other questions of the paper we sat in June because I can't find it online and my teacher has been useless, I remember the use of light in Macbeth coming up and of course, the monster being Frankenstein's double. I can imagine Religion definitely coming up
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sparker94
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I'm also doing Frankenstein and Wuthering Heights, but we're doing Macbeth, not Dr Faustus. Loving them so far! Apart from Wuthering Heights: I very strongly dislike the Brontës...
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Lynndenial
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You can't really beat doing past papers and reading exemplar papers for English Lit unfortunately! I made my mum read my papers, haha - poor woman, she'd never read the texts. But that was part of the test of my writing, I wanted to make sure even someone that knew nothing about it could understand my line of argument.

For those of you who, like me, need your notes all written up so you can feel like you're doing actual work, I made a massive list of every gothic feature (with quotes and relevant context details) I could think of for each text. I did this the night before the exam, mind you, but it was more a way of calming my mind since all the details that get thrown at you can get quite jumbled up...
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