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The Describe The Person Above You Generation IX Watch

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    Loves French

    Poser- to ask a question

    Demander - to ask for something

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    (Original post by StUdEnTIGCSE)
    Loves French

    Poser- to ask a question

    Demander - to ask for something

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    So does this make sense:

    Il m'avait demandé faire lui (his?) déjeuner?
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    So does this make sense:

    Il m'avait demandé faire lui (his?) déjeuner?
    Il m'avait demandé a lui faire à manger - le déjeuner.

    Or, il à demandé que je lui (le?) Prepare un (son) déjeuner.
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    (Original post by ipoop)
    Il m'avait demandé a lui faire à manger - le déjeuner.

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    he had asked me..

    Why have the a?
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    he had asked me..

    Why have the a?
    Which à? First or second?

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    (Original post by ipoop)
    Which à? First or second?

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    The first, it didn't have an accent.
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    The first, it didn't have an accent.
    It should. :mmm: my phone changed it.

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    (Original post by ipoop)
    It should. :mmm: my phone changed it.

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    aah, okay, why?
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    aah, okay, why?
    English letters don't have accents? :dontknow:

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    (Original post by ipoop)
    Jerry is a baws!



    That'd good to hear, it was good, Cirque du Soleil at the Royal Albert! :teeth:

    Eyes hurt? They had lasers? :holmes:

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    Not really; but there was so much smoke I could hardly see. T'was good, though. :yep:
    What's Cirque du Soleil?






    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    ^ :hand: who remembers...

    Courage the Cowardly Dog?

    :mmm:
    That show made my childhood. Ah, memories
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    ^:five:

    (Original post by ipoop)
    English letters don't have accents? :dontknow:

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    No, as in why do we use it?lol
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    ^Accents are supposed to assist with pronounciation :dontknow:

    (Original post by ipoop)
    English letters don't have accents? :dontknow:

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    Some words we borrow from French keep their accents though. For example, "Déjà vu" is the correct way of writing it in English. There we could kind of say we use accents in English :smug:
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    (Original post by The Epicurean)
    ^Accents are supposed to assist with pronounciation :dontknow:



    Some words we borrow from French keep their accents though. For example, "Déjà vu" is the correct way of writing it in English. There we could kind of say we use accents in English :smug:
    not the actual accent :lol:

    Why is is in the sentence
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    (Original post by The Epicurean)
    ^Accents are supposed to assist with pronounciation :dontknow:



    Some words we borrow from French keep their accents though. For example, "Déjà vu" is the correct way of writing it in English. There we could kind of say we use accents in English :smug:
    As you said, words borrowed from FRENCH. :hand: They may be used in the English language, they are still French. You can take the word away from France but you can't take away the French out of the word.:smug:

    Hide your smugness, it has been exposed as misplaced, nd not ethical. :pierre:

    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    ^:five:
    No, as in why do we use it?lol
    What zed said but, there's also grammatical reasons for them. For 'a' alone you have 'a', 'à' and 'â'. I can't remember why but I know when to use them. Ask your teacher. :dontknow: or google it, I'm sure you'll find a valid explanation, a better explanation than what I would have given you.

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    (Original post by ipoop)
    As you said, words borrowed from FRENCH. :hand: They may be used in the English language, they are still French. You can take the word away from France but you can't take away the French out of the word.:smug:

    Hide your smugness, it has been exposed as misplaced, nd not ethical. :pierre:



    What zed said but, there's also grammatical reasons for them. For 'a' alone you have 'a', 'à' and 'â'. I can't remember why but I know when to use them. Ask your teacher. :dontknow: or google it, I'm sure you'll find a valid explanation, a better explanation than what I would have given you.

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    That's what I mean, the grammar of it... Don't worry :lol:

    Je trouverai pourquoi avant je retourne
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    What's from in French? Like:

    He came from...
    I've returned from...
    Etc.
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    Venir.

    Je viens de....

    Je reviens de...

    Return - retour

    Je suis de retour de mon voyage en France.

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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    not the actual accent :lol:

    Why is is in the sentence
    I would have thought "Because they are French" would have been a sufficient answer :pierre:

    (Original post by ipoop)
    As you said, words borrowed from FRENCH. :hand: They may be used in the English language, they are still French. You can take the word away from France but you can't take away the French out of the word.:smug:

    Hide your smugness, it has been exposed as misplaced, nd not ethical. :pierre:

    That is silly though -_- Because if we follow that logic, most French words descent from languages like Latin and Greek. Therefore stop trying to claim Latin and Greek words for yourself :hand:
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    (Original post by ipoop)
    Venir.

    Je viens de....

    Je reviens de...

    Return - retour

    Je suis de retour de mon voyage en France.

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    venir = to come from?

    What's reviens?
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    (Original post by The Epicurean)
    I would have thought "Because they are French" would have been a sufficient answer :pierre:

    That is silly though -_- Because if we follow that logic, most French words descent from languages like Latin and Greek. Therefore stop trying to claim Latin and Greek words for yourself :hand:
    That may be but we have asserted our grammatical rules and changed the spelling of the words based on our pronouncing of the words - although many silent letters do feature.

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