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    006 reporting for duty. :cool:
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    (Original post by Diety)
    Vive la Revolution! :france: by the way, just saw your post on X-Soc got some more members so thanks again
    Sorry to hear about your family too, spurred me to pray for the first time in weeks, had a kind of numinous/emotional breakdown moment in the process... Keeping them in my thoughts, hope it gets better soon :console:
    Aww, thanks hun. You didn't have to pray if you didn't want to. I'm sorry it caused all that grief!

    Thanks for keeping them in your thoughts: really appreciate that :hugs:

    (Original post by Angury)
    I have to admit I wasn't really aware of C.S. Lewis' work - the only books I'd read by him were The Chronicles of Narnia. But I've been watching this thread over the past couple of days, and I'm becoming more and more interested.
    Which book would you guys suggest I start off with/which pieces of his work do you enjoy most?
    As much as I love it, I probably wouldn't start with The Four Loves. Being a book about love, it can be kinda abstract at points and result in a bit of mind**** :p:
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    I'll join! Though I've only read the Narnia series...
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    No worries: I'm sure Diety will agree with me when I say the more, the merrier!
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    (Original post by Angury)
    I have to admit I wasn't really aware of C.S. Lewis' work - the only books I'd read by him were The Chronicles of Narnia. But I've been watching this thread over the past couple of days, and I'm becoming more and more interested.
    Which book would you guys suggest I start off with/which pieces of his work do you enjoy most?
    I have only read 2 so I'm not the most knowledgeable. However, if there is any method to which book you should read, it comes from the magic of the man himself; CS Lewis is amazing at giving truly brilliant insights into whatever subject he turns his mind to. With this in mind, the answer I would give is, read the book on the subject you are most interested in, and most want to hear explained. The only book I chose to read was 'The Problem of Pain' because I have always questioned why there is suffering in the world, and I have to say, I have not been disappointed by the insights

    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    Aww, thanks hun. You didn't have to pray if you didn't want to. I'm sorry it caused all that grief!

    Thanks for keeping them in your thoughts: really appreciate that :hugs:
    No problemo :hugs: I did want to pray, I should do it more often really :yep: it wasn't any grief, I just tend to be emotionally unstable in general! :nutcase:

    (Original post by Goody2Shoes-x)
    I'll join! Though I've only read the Narnia series...
    That's fine! :awesome: I haven't read them yet, what did you think of them?

    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    No worries: I'm sure Diety will agree with me when I say the more, the merrier!
    :youbetcha:
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    I absolutely love the Chronicles of Narnia. I hope to read much more of his work
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    (Original post by Diety)
    No problemo :hugs: I did want to pray, I should do it more often really :yep: it wasn't any grief, I just tend to be emotionally unstable in general! :nutcase:
    All the best people are emotionally unstable :yep::awesome::five:

    :ninja:
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    All the best people are emotionally unstable :yep::awesome::five:

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    (Original post by Diety)



    That's fine! :awesome: I haven't read them yet, what did you think of them?

    I loved them! I got the whole set in one massive book as a child, but didn't get round to reading them till I was about 12. They're so good - although I think there was a bit of a decline in quality in later books, and the last is definitely not one of my faves, I really appreciate the series as a whole and think it's a definite footnote in the fantasy genre.
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    (Original post by Diety)
    I have only read 2 so I'm not the most knowledgeable. However, if there is any method to which book you should read, it comes from the magic of the man himself; CS Lewis is amazing at giving truly brilliant insights into whatever subject he turns his mind to. With this in mind, the answer I would give is, read the book on the subject you are most interested in, and most want to hear explained. The only book I chose to read was 'The Problem of Pain' because I have always questioned why there is suffering in the world, and I have to say, I have not been disappointed by the insights
    That's a good way to look at it actually. I'm still not aware of the full extent of CS Lewis' work, so I'll do some research and find some of his books which interest me.

    (Original post by Goody2Shoes-x)
    I loved them! I got the whole set in one massive book as a child, but didn't get round to reading them till I was about 12. They're so good - although I think there was a bit of a decline in quality in later books, and the last is definitely not one of my faves, I really appreciate the series as a whole and think it's a definite footnote in the fantasy genre.
    I haven't read the Narnia series in ages - which book was your favourite? The Silver Chair seems to have stayed with me, more so than any of the other books. Which is interesting because most people who I've spoken to seem to really dislike that book.
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    (Original post by Goody2Shoes-x)
    I loved them! I got the whole set in one massive book as a child, but didn't get round to reading them till I was about 12. They're so good - although I think there was a bit of a decline in quality in later books, and the last is definitely not one of my faves, I really appreciate the series as a whole and think it's a definite footnote in the fantasy genre.
    No way, The last Battle is definitely in my top three Narnia books. I loved the powerful imagery and style of writing was so compelling
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    (Original post by Angury)
    That's a good way to look at it actually. I'm still not aware of the full extent of CS Lewis' work, so I'll do some research and find some of his books which interest me.



    I haven't read the Narnia series in ages - which book was your favourite? The Silver Chair seems to have stayed with me, more so than any of the other books. Which is interesting because most people who I've spoken to seem to really dislike that book.
    It's so hard to choose - whilst I did like the Silver Chair it wasn't in my top three! Probably either the Horse and his Boy, the Magician's Nephew or the good old the Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe.

    The Horse and His boy told things from a very itneresting and different point of view, Magician's Nephew was how it all began, plus I found it funny, and the lion the witch and the wardrobe was just a classic!
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    (Original post by WildeAboutOscar)
    No way, The last Battle is definitely in my top three Narnia books. I loved the powerful imagery and style of writing was so compelling
    Without giving too much away for people who haven't read it, I just felt it was a bit of an anticlimax.
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    (Original post by Goody2Shoes-x)
    It's so hard to choose - whilst I did like the Silver Chair it wasn't in my top three! Probably either the Horse and his Boy, the Magician's Nephew or the good old the Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe.

    The Horse and His boy told things from a very itneresting and different point of view, Magician's Nephew was how it all began, plus I found it funny, and the lion the witch and the wardrobe was just a classic!
    I really enjoyed reading the Horse and his Boy as well actually. I don't really like the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe as much anymore, maybe because I've watched the movies so many times. The Magician's Nephew was a nice introduction to the series, but I agree with you on the Last Battle - it wasn't really what I was expecting.
    I have a sudden urge to reread the series now.
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    (Original post by Angury)
    I really enjoyed reading the Horse and his Boy as well actually. I don't really like the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe as much anymore, maybe because I've watched the movies so many times. The Magician's Nephew was a nice introduction to the series, but I agree with you on the Last Battle - it wasn't really what I was expecting.
    I have a sudden urge to reread the series now.

    Do it, read the series. Ps I just saw you're from northern Ireland go visit Queens library and also do a CS Lewis bus tour.
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    This thread has encouraged me to start reading some C.S Lewis, starting with the Screwtape Letters
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    (Original post by FuzzySheep)
    This thread has encouraged me to start reading some C.S Lewis, starting with the Screwtape Letters
    You won't regret it. The Screw Tape letters are amazing. They even made it into a play on BroadWay, I wish I went to see it.
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    (Original post by WildeAboutOscar)
    Do it, read the series. Ps I just saw you're from northern Ireland go visit Queens library and also do a CS Lewis bus tour.
    Don't you have to be a student to visit the university library? As for the CS Lewis bus tour, I didn't even know there was one! I feel slightly ashamed now.. But I definitely will the next time I'm back in NI.
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    Just finished reading The Problem of Pain; it's a really great book for anyone pondering the question 'why do bad things happen?'

    On another note, I noticed the discussion about which Narnia book is the best and wonder what order people read them in? I read up on the debate about whether they should be read in chronological or publication order and found that apparently 'scholarly oppinion' (yes, there are actually people who are Narnia scholars :ahee: ) favours publication order; what do people think?
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    (Original post by Diety)
    Just finished reading The Problem of Pain; it's a really great book for anyone pondering the question 'why do bad things happen?'

    On another note, I noticed the discussion about which Narnia book is the best and wonder what order people read them in? I read up on the debate about whether they should be read in chronological or publication order and found that apparently 'scholarly oppinion' (yes, there are actually people who are Narnia scholars :ahee: ) favours publication order; what do people think?
    I've only read them by chronological order. I didn't realise you could read them in a different order.. would they still make sense? Although I suppose each story is different so you don't really need that much background information. I prefer reading them chronologically anyway, it seems to flow nicely for me that way.
 
 
 
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