Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Angury)
    I've only read them by chronological order. I didn't realise you could read them in a different order.. would they still make sense? Although I suppose each story is different so you don't really need that much background information. I prefer reading them chronologically anyway, it seems to flow nicely for me that way.
    This gives a brief outline of both sides of the debate, I have to say, the reasons given that they should be read in the order in which they were published seems most convincing to me... take a look and tell me what you think.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    CS Lewis is my hero. I really wanted a poster of his for my bedroom for Christmas :')

    Inklings FTW

    I got 4 more of his books this Christmas. Prior to that I absolutely love Mere Christianity! Amazing book~

    The final Screwtape letter is so beautiful. It still makes me cry u_u

    I also strongly advise you read Lewis's talk on 'The Inner Ring' which was a speech he gave at a graduation ceremony~

    Also, am I the only one who thinks he was rather handsome in his youth?
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Diety)
    Just finished reading The Problem of Pain; it's a really great book for anyone pondering the question 'why do bad things happen?'

    On another note, I noticed the discussion about which Narnia book is the best and wonder what order people read them in? I read up on the debate about whether they should be read in chronological or publication order and found that apparently 'scholarly oppinion' (yes, there are actually people who are Narnia scholars :ahee: ) favours publication order; what do people think?
    I think publication order is better. I read the first two books in the "chronological" order and I think the end of The Magician's Nephew kinda spoilt The Lion etc. :sadnod:
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Silverland)
    CS Lewis is my hero. I really wanted a poster of his for my bedroom for Christmas :')

    Inklings FTW

    I got 4 more of his books this Christmas. Prior to that I absolutely love Mere Christianity! Amazing book~

    The final Screwtape letter is so beautiful. It still makes me cry u_u

    I also strongly advise you read Lewis's talk on 'The Inner Ring' which was a speech he gave at a graduation ceremony~

    Also, am I the only one who thinks he was rather handsome in his youth?
    Yay for the Screwtape love.

    Well, he is adorable :love: there is no question about that but I also love his mind. He is such an interesting guy .
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Silverland)
    CS Lewis is my hero. I really wanted a poster of his for my bedroom for Christmas :')

    Inklings FTW

    I got 4 more of his books this Christmas. Prior to that I absolutely love Mere Christianity! Amazing book~

    The final Screwtape letter is so beautiful. It still makes me cry u_u

    I also strongly advise you read Lewis's talk on 'The Inner Ring' which was a speech he gave at a graduation ceremony~

    Also, am I the only one who thinks he was rather handsome in his youth?
    Yum! He looks scrummy! Definitely my type.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Diety)
    This gives a brief outline of both sides of the debate, I have to say, the reasons given that they should be read in the order in which they were published seems most convincing to me... take a look and tell me what you think.
    I'd never really thought of it that way to be honest. A lot of good points were brought up in that article, I might try reading the series in publication order next time.

    I was looking at "Problem of Pain" and came across this review:

    "A quick warning to those who have been pointed to this book but are not Christian: you are not the audience Lewis is speaking to. This book cannot be fully grasped in its original context without some degree of belief or acceptance of Christian doctrine."

    What do you think? I was going to give it a go because I thought it sounded quite interesting, but I'm not so sure now.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    I really enjoyed A.N Wilson's biography of CS... it explains the hold his ghastly ex-landlady maintained on him for decades
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by the bear)
    I really enjoyed A.N Wilson's biography of CS... it explains the hold his ghastly ex-landlady maintained on him for decades
    what did she do? :<
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Silverland)
    what did she do? :<


    i won't spoil it... read the book !
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by the bear)
    i won't spoil it... read the book !
    Well I have 4 Lewis books to churn through first before I order another one
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Angury)
    I was looking at "Problem of Pain" and came across this review:

    "A quick warning to those who have been pointed to this book but are not Christian: you are not the audience Lewis is speaking to. This book cannot be fully grasped in its original context without some degree of belief or acceptance of Christian doctrine."

    What do you think? I was going to give it a go because I thought it sounded quite interesting, but I'm not so sure now.
    I would have to disagree from personal experience alone I'm not a Christian (well... long story ), I come from a completely atheist family, and I've never read any more of the Bible than two of the gospels, so I don't think you need to be a Christian to enjoy it. As for having 'some degree of belief', I can't deny having that, but when I read Miracles I didn't, and that is similarly a Christian work, and I loved it. I think believers will get something extra out of it, just like they will be more open to all the religious symbolism is Narnia, however it still provides a fantastic insight into what Christians believe about this great problem.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by the bear)
    i won't spoil it... read the book !
    Do spill the beans chum :puppyeyes:
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    I am a huge fan of CS despite his protestantism but nobody until Mr Wilson has dared to ask sensible questions about his failure with women
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by the bear)
    I am a huge fan of CS despite his protestantism but nobody until Mr Wilson has dared to ask sensible questions about his failure with women
    He had a wife, no? :/
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    This is fantastic

    What is your favourite C.S. Lewis book?
    Hmm... probably Mere Christianity at this point, but the more I read of his the more I realise there is still SO much I haven't read. I just started his space trilogy and hope to finish when I can get back to my uni's library after break, and I really like it so far.

    What do you like about C.S. Lewis?
    He was so fascinating but so REAL. I feel he's one of the best ever Christian authors because he understands being totally sinful yet able to accept God's gift of salvation. I also hugely admire Lewis' brain and all the amazing things he came up with... his writings on theology as well as his various thoughts about Christianity just astound me and challenge me to think. Not just that, but his fiction, especially the space series, is so well done.

    When did you first come across C.S. Lewis?
    My mum studied in England and is a huge fan of his work, so I grew up having the Narnia series read to me. I later had to read Mere Christianity for school as well as biographies on Lewis so I've been familiar with him for a while.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Diety)
    I would have to disagree from personal experience alone I'm not a Christian (well... long story ), I come from a completely atheist family, and I've never read any more of the Bible than two of the gospels, so I don't think you need to be a Christian to enjoy it. As for having 'some degree of belief', I can't deny having that, but when I read Miracles I didn't, and that is similarly a Christian work, and I loved it. I think believers will get something extra out of it, just like they will be more open to all the religious symbolism is Narnia, however it still provides a fantastic insight into what Christians believe about this great problem.
    Yeah, I'm not religious either so I wasn't sure whether CS Lewis' other works would really engage with me. But I do want to try something new, and I'd like to keep an open mind. Plus I've had a read through some CS Lewis fansites and some of his work does sound very interesting. I guess I may as well give it a go.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by the bear)
    I really enjoyed A.N Wilson's biography of CS... it explains the hold his ghastly ex-landlady maintained on him for decades
    Was that Mrs.whats-her-face? I was reading a Lewis biography a few months ago and remembered her being mentioned.... wasn't she the mother of one of his old friends or something? I remember from the biography that they were complete opposites and her even yelling/being verbally abuse towards him, other people reported... it was something weird. For some reason, as he explained to his brother/friends, apparently she "understood" him even though they were like totally different people. I don't know... it was just really odd.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Angury)
    Yeah, I'm not religious either so I wasn't sure whether CS Lewis' other works would really engage with me. But I do want to try something new, and I'd like to keep an open mind. Plus I've had a read through some CS Lewis fansites and some of his work does sound very interesting. I guess I may as well give it a go.
    Hmmm, I'm not sure now whether The Problem of Pain really is the best place to start or a non-Christian... I thought Miracles was actually better (I only read it because a teacher gave it to me) :beard: though maybe it was only the novelty of it being my first CS Lewis book... I'm really not sure, it's up to you, they're all brilliant
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PaigeOfPaper)
    Was that Mrs.whats-her-face? I was reading a Lewis biography a few months ago and remembered her being mentioned.... wasn't she the mother of one of his old friends or something? I remember from the biography that they were complete opposites and her even yelling/being verbally abuse towards him, other people reported... it was something weird. For some reason, as he explained to his brother/friends, apparently she "understood" him even though they were like totally different people. I don't know... it was just really odd.

    Mrs Jane Moore...
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Silverland)
    He had a wife, no? :/
    He did - Joy, who was a younger woman.

    Have any of you guys read any of his poems? Please read 'As the Ruin Falls' absolutely breathe taking :love:
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.