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Smokers: Will the recent news make you quit? Watch

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    Will the recent news that every 15 cigarettes causes a gene mutation make you quit?

    It's certainly made me think a lot every time I light up.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...-mutation.html

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aCgekCcd4ng
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    Everything is bad for you these days, pollution, car fumes, chemicals in fabrics like curtains, wifi, mobile phones, memory foam matresses. You have to die of something. I obsess about my health but thats what i was told by some nurses.
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    But you forget the psychology of news: everything wears off with time. Anywhere from one week to one month from now you will definitely not be thinking about this.
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    That new advert against smoking is disgusting....however I dont know if it will encourage people to quit.Saying that though, if people arent ready to stop then no end of warnings will make them quit.It has to come from the smoker themselves.

    It'll certainly keep this ex smoker from going back to the ciggies though!
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    (Original post by Yanis_AFC)
    Will the recent news that every 15 cigarettes causes a gene mutation make you quit?

    It's certainly made me think a lot every time I light up.

    http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/health...cle3641818.ece

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aCgekCcd4ng
    Not advocating smoking, and I will admit I haven't looked at either of those links, but... in the 50s and 60s*, EVERYBODY smoked, including surgeons between patients, and where are the effects of the 'gene mutations' from back then?

    As I said, I don't disagree that smoking can be bad for your health, and I have given up (mostly). However, I do think that some of this scaremongering by the government is just that - scaremongering. I think the health problems that we're told about are exaggerated. All with good intentions mind, I think that a society where nobody smoked would be a better one and not smoking DOES improve a person's health. I just don't believe that the severity of what they say sometimes is entirely accurate.
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    (Original post by fairysdad)
    Not advocating smoking, and I will admit I haven't looked at either of those links, but... in the 50s and 60s*, EVERYBODY smoked, including surgeons between patients, and where are the effects of the 'gene mutations' from back then?
    It's the mutations which cause cancer.
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    This article is 3 years old, so i'm guessing: no.

    This makes me feel poorly looking at it, if i were a smoker and were to see that then yes, it would probably make me want to quit. Think it's a brilliant video and should definitely be shown.
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    As an ex smoker it made me realise the damage but whether it's put me of completely is another question.

    There's many things that cause cancer such as UV light, X-rays, phones. A few members of my family have died from cancer but not due to smoking. the 7year old caught cancer simply by falling over and damaging her knee.

    It's a bad way to look at it but I think if I'm going to get cancer I will regardless if I'm a smoker or not


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    in a word, no. i enjoy my cigarettes and besides if im going to die id rather rather it be on my own terms.
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    This advertisment campaign, like all campaigns against smoking, is misleading and exaggerates the dangers and health risks of smoking.

    Smoking is wildly detrimental to your health don't get me wrong, and I don't personally smoke, but this campaign is rediculous in my eyes. What bothers me is the "15 cigarettes will give you terminal cancer" feel of the advertisment, yet for obvious reasons it fails to mention how good our body and immune system is at removing the risk of possibly harmful mutations, since it has to deal with them quite often as well as leading you to believe that all mutations will turn a cell cancerous.

    • No I enjoy it. I could die driving to work tomorrow. I know the risks and I accept the consequences.


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      (Original post by cl_steele)
      in a word, no. i enjoy my cigarettes and besides if im going to die id rather rather it be on my own terms.
      How exactly does getting cancer and dying within about 2 years mean dying on your own terms? You can do **** all about it. You've got 2 years to live doing whatever you want, and you're running around on cancer's clock.

      Now, if you don't smoke, you live a longer life doing whatever the hell you want, take your time, enjoy life, and you could shoot yourself if you're really intent on 'dying on your own terms'. To be honest though, that really sounds quite pathetic, as if having control over your death somehow makes you cool for being a non-conformist.
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      (Original post by RichyFrench)
      How exactly does getting cancer and dying within about 2 years mean dying on your own terms? You can do **** all about it. You've got 2 years to live doing whatever you want, and you're running around on cancer's clock.
      How the hell did you work this out?
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      Well if every 15 cigarattes cause a mutation and you've smoked more than 15 in your lifetime, then surely the damage is already done?

      I'm certainly all for quitting and making an improvement to your life, but for people who say quit after 35 years of smoking, surely they've done so much damage that it won't make the slightest bit of difference if they quit or not? :confused:
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      (Original post by Yanis_AFC)
      How the hell did you work this out?
      Fine, 5 years.. Whatever. Once you have cancer you don't have that long, unless you're lucky enough to get rid of it with some ridiculously low-success treatments.

      2 years was a random number, but what I'm emphasizing is you have wayyy longer if you don't have cancer.
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      (Original post by fairysdad)
      Not advocating smoking, and I will admit I haven't looked at either of those links, but... in the 50s and 60s*, EVERYBODY smoked, including surgeons between patients, and where are the effects of the 'gene mutations' from back then?

      As I said, I don't disagree that smoking can be bad for your health, and I have given up (mostly). However, I do think that some of this scaremongering by the government is just that - scaremongering. I think the health problems that we're told about are exaggerated. All with good intentions mind, I think that a society where nobody smoked would be a better one and not smoking DOES improve a person's health. I just don't believe that the severity of what they say sometimes is entirely accurate.
      I'm not entirely sure, but back in the 50s and 60s I don't think there were as many harmful chemicals in cigarettes as there are today. And I do agree that the campaigns are likely exaggarated to an extent.
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      (Original post by Jabberwox)
      Well if every 15 cigarattes cause a mutation and you've smoked more than 15 in your lifetime, then surely the damage is already done?

      I'm certainly all for quitting and making an improvement to your life, but for people who say quit after 35 years of smoking, surely they've done so much damage that it won't make the slightest bit of difference if they quit or not? :confused:
      This is true to an extent. But I've looked it up anyway, and this is what happens:

      Within just twenty minutes, you will start to feel the benefits, with your blood pressure and pulse returning to normal. After eight hours the nicotine and carbon monoxide in your blood will have halved, and oxygen levels will have returned to healthy levels.

      Within 24 hours, the carbon monoxide – which hinders the blood from bringing oxygen to your cells, tissues and organs – has been removed from your body, and the mucus and smoking debris will start to clear from your lungs, making breathing easier.

      After two days there is no nicotine left in your body, and your senses of smell and taste will have started to improve dramatically. After three days, you should start to feel more energised and your breathing will become easier.

      Within around three months your circulation will have improved, and any cough or wheezing should have mostly cleared up. Compared to when you were smoking, your lung function should have increased by around 10 per cent.

      After several years, your risk of long-term disease begins to fall.

      After five years, the possibility of a heart attack is roughly half that of someone who is still smoking, and after ten years free from smoking, your heart attack risk is that of a non-smoker, while your risk of lung cancer has been halved.


      So after ten years of quitting, the body is nearly that of a non-smoker. Maybe it's never too late.
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      (Original post by RichyFrench)
      How exactly does getting cancer and dying within about 2 years mean dying on your own terms? You can do **** all about it. You've got 2 years to live doing whatever you want, and you're running around on cancer's clock.

      Now, if you don't smoke, you live a longer life doing whatever the hell you want, take your time, enjoy life, and you could shoot yourself if you're really intent on 'dying on your own terms'. To be honest though, that really sounds quite pathetic, as if having control over your death somehow makes you cool for being a non-conformist.
      Nom de dieu... Seriously? Take a long hard look at what you just wrote kid and think just how stupid you made yourself sound like seriously brain damaged stupid. 2 years? Paha I must be living on borrow time then lest I'm immortal? Get your facts straight before you dare to have the sheer impudence to try and lecture me again.
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      (Original post by cl_steele)
      Nom de dieu... Seriously? Take a long hard look at what you just wrote kid and think just how stupid you made yourself sound like seriously brain damaged stupid. 2 years? Paha I must be living on borrow time then lest I'm immortal? Get your facts straight before you dare to have the sheer impudence to try and lecture me again.
      2 years, 5 years, 10 years.. Whatever. Cancer kills, that's just how it is. If you wanna look big and brave because you're not scared of death then go ahead, smoke all you like and keep fooling yourself that you can die on your own terms when you play with fire. I'm not gonna argue with you.
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      smokers are not the brightest pixels on the screen so i doubt it will have much effect
     
     
     
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