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    ..Can someone please explain
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    It's quite simple really, after anelling of the primer to the target DNA, transcription occurs to create the new strand of DNA and because the primer that was used had a fluorescent tag, the DNA strand itself retains the tag.

    This allows for DNA profiling and identification of the important loci via electrophoresis methods
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    (Original post by mohamedsuleman94)
    ..Can someone please explain
    They're able to detect the specific target sequence, meaning non specific products aren't quantified. It also allows multiplex reactions to occur, this is basically identifying any duplications or deletions in a large gene. Beaten to it though
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    (Original post by Eloades11)
    They're able to detect the specific target sequence, meaning non specific products aren't quantified. It also allows multiplex reactions to occur, this is basically identifying any duplications or deletions in a large gene. Beaten to it though
    (Original post by Mockery)
    It's quite simple really, after anelling of the primer to the target DNA, transcription occurs to create the new strand of DNA and because the primer that was used had a fluorescent tag, the DNA strand itself retains the tag.

    This allows for DNA profiling and identification of the important loci via electrophoresis methods
    Thanks and I I think I've got it but (elodes 11) by they're do you mean dna polymerase can detect the target strand to be replicated?
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    (Original post by mohamedsuleman94)
    Thanks and I I think I've got it but (elodes 11) by they're do you mean dna polymerase can detect the target strand to be replicated?
    Not quite, if the primer sequence isn't complementary to the strand then it won't bind (unless every other base is and the primer is large, which induces a point mutation). The primers recognise and bind to the existing template strand, the DNA polymerase simply recognises the dsDNA with the primer, and replicates the rest of the strand. Does this help?
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    (Original post by Eloades11)
    Not quite, if the primer sequence isn't complementary to the strand then it won't bind (unless every other base is and the primer is large, which induces a point mutation). The primers recognise and bind to the existing template strand, the DNA polymerase simply recognises the dsDNA with the primer, and replicates the rest of the strand. Does this help?
    Yes, thanks a lot!
 
 
 
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