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    I don't think you can say we play, we've played lots of different formations to suit the players we have at the time. We also have a new manager who has his own idea about the best way to play. Kagawa will do find, the fact he hasn't pushed one of the most established players in the PL out of position in his first season is hardly cause for alarm. All of our wingers are capable of playing that wider creative role, all of Nani, Young and Zaha are capable of coming inside and linking player Welbeck too, the only one who isn't is Valencia.
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    I think it's time for Valencia to go. He was good for the first couple or so years because his turn of pace down the line just caught everyone out and he was a decent crosser. Now, his crossing seems to have worsened and he's just too predictable and overall a bit of a one-dimensional player. If we cash in on him now I think we could still get some decent money.
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    If Welbeck, zaha and young are regulars in the first team next season then boy have united downgraded from the team they had back in 2008
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    Anyone seen the story in the MEN today about City partnering with the New York Yankees to set up a MLS franchise in New York in 2015? Terrible idea I think ...

    1) Most of the US population don't care about soccer
    2) The Yankees may be huge but have no experience when it comes to soccer
    3) The main man that made the Yankees one of the biggest brands in the world is dead
    4) New York already has 2 teams, one of which is one of the larger MLS franchises
    5) Manchester United have a large supporters club in New York so they won't even catch the English market out there
    6) They're not going to develop any decent players out of it because kids there don't aim to be pro footballers

    It's a worthless venture really. The only purpose it might serve is loaning their youth and reserve players out there to give them game time but that's not smart business either cos none of them are going to make it into the main team whilst they're spunking cash on big name [and often overrated] players from abroad.
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    (Original post by Tommyjw)
    I don't see the issue personally.

    Kagawas best game? Norwich where he played on the left. Positions aren't pre-defined, and his average position that match was only slightly to the left of Rooneys in the middle which shows the level of interchangeability. This is a thing common in most of the games on the left.

    The issue i have is how much time he has played, rather than where. He should have been brought on at times, shouldn't have been left our for welbeck at times etc etc.
    I guess playing time was mentioned by Klopp too. He did have an injury which interfered with his game time. I reckon he would have started almost all of our big games had he not been hit with that injury.

    Agree about Kagawa on the left, for this year at least. I do think we looked at our strongest (and most natural) when Rooney was behind the striker and Kagawa on the left. The variety of attack coming from both sides (left and right) of the pitch is something I enjoyed seeing.

    I
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    (Original post by yaboy)
    If Welbeck, zaha and young are regulars in the first team next season then boy have united downgraded from the team they had back in 2008
    2008 was too immense admittedly this squad now is not as good but give it 2 seasons they will be just as good... But to compare this team now with 2008 is comparing arsenal 2006 to now... No comparison whatsoever ..


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    A rare Paul Scholes interview (The Times):

    Spoiler:
    Show
    It was a brief, almost perfunctory conversation between two men who have lived and breathed Manchester United for a combined period of almost five decades. It took place just outside the dressing room, in the corridor at Carrington, after training on a cold February morning.

    “Next season, what do you think?” Sir Alex Ferguson, the manager who had dominated the club for 26½ years, said. Paul Scholes, one of his most trusty lieutenants, looked back, wrinkled his nose and shook his head. It was all Ferguson needed to see. “You are probably right,” Ferguson replied. “It’s time.”

    In 12 simple words, the curtain had fallen on one of the most sublime careers in the history of English football. “We both knew,” Scholes says when we meet at the United training complex. “It was obvious to us both that I was off the pace. I knew it deep down and the boss could see it. We didn’t need a long, drawn-out conversation. There will be no comeback this time.”

    Scholes has enjoyed more than half a lifetime at Old Trafford, winning trophies and plaudits in equal measure. His résumé includes 11 Premier League titles, three FA Cups, two League Cups, two European Cups and one Club World Cup. According to many of his most illustrious peers, he is the definitive midfielder of the past two decades.

    But, when you meet the 38-year-old, his most striking characteristic is a glorious indifference to celebrity. Football is not, for him, a means to an end (stardom or riches). Rather, it is, to quote from Sartre, “the thing in itself”.

    He finds meaning in the game he has graced for so long and is bemused by the contemporary obsession with limelight and superficial fame.

    “I love football, have done since I first started kicking a ball as a boy,” he says. “But I am not interested in the things that go with it. For me, it is about the game, a way of playing. The pleasure of striking a ball or finding the right pass. It is not about having my name up in lights.

    “I was pleased to retire when I did because I was overshadowed by bigger names bowing out at the same time. I got out under the radar.”

    Scholes is a courteous person, too, making sure I am comfortable and offering to fetch a drink. Perhaps such characteristics shouldn’t need mentioning, but they are significant in a world where so many stars lose touch with the basics of human decency.

    Perhaps Ferguson needs thanking for that, too, because grounding is a common attribute among United players. “It is difficult to run away with yourself here,” Scholes says with a smile. “You would quickly be brought back down to earth.”

    I read to Scholes the eulogies that have been expressed by many of the top players of recent times.

    Xavi Hernández: “In the last 15 to 20 years the best central midfielder that I have seen — the most complete — is Scholes.” Zinedine Zidane: “My toughest opponent? Scholes of Manchester. He is the complete midfielder.” Edgar Davids, while at the peak of his game: “I’m not the best, Paul Scholes is.” Pep Guardiola: “He is the best midfielder of his generation. I would have loved to have played alongside him.” Cristiano Ronaldo: “Scholes is the best I’ve played with and he helped me a lot when I was young. He’s amazing.” Wayne Rooney: “The best player I’ve played with or against.” And so it goes on.

    Perhaps no player in the modern history of the English game has been so universally revered. When you ask the most storied and exotic names whom they most admire, they invariably plump for a ginger-haired, quietly spoken Coronation Street aficionado from Langley. As Pelé put it: “If he was playing with me, I would have scored so many more.”

    Scholes smiles and shakes his head as he listens to the tributes. “It is very nice to hear, very flattering,” he says. “But I don’t really agree. These guys have won World Cups and European Championships. I think you have to do it on the biggest stage to be considered a true great. I haven’t done that.”

    This humility is not for show. When I press Scholes on his own assessment of his place in history, he is more comfortable talking about his weaknesses (tackling) than his strengths. This is a genuinely self-effacing genius.

    When I ask who is the finest player he has played against, he pauses, his inner computer making rapid assessments of the legion of opponents he has faced down the years. He laughs and shrugs. “So many brilliant players,” he says finally. “Xavi, Iniesta, Messi. Vieira was a fantastic player, too. But if I had to pick one, I would go with Zidane. He could do it all.”

    When I ask about the finest player he has played with, he is rather more emphatic. “There are a lot of contenders, but only one clear winner,” he says. “The contenders include Keane, Robson, Cole, Yorke, Sheringham, Van Nistelroy, all unbelievable players. Nicky, Phil, David and Gary, of course. Brucey, Pally and Irwin were brilliant too. One of the great things about playing at this club has been the quality of my team-mates.

    “But the best has to be Ryan Giggs. He is unreal. He can go past players, tackle players, and he can head a ball. He wants to make goals and he wants to score goals. The way he looks after himself is incredible. He is still one of the quickest and fittest players in the world, and he is almost 40. When Gary, Nicky, me and David came into the set-up, we idolised him. In some ways, I still do. He could go on for as long as he likes. He is in a league of his own.”

    As we move on to his thoughts on the wider game, Scholes’s knowledge is profound. His off-the-record descriptions of team-mates — strengths, technical defects and observations on how they might improve — are encyclopaedic in their detail. It is obvious why many of his colleagues regard him as among the deepest thinkers in football.

    When I put this to him, however, he smiles modestly once again. “That is because I don’t say much,” he says. “So when I do say something, people tend to sit up and listen.”

    Scholes is keen to make the transition into the coaching staff at United, provided that he is given the go-ahead by David Moyes, the new manager. But one senses that, at some stage, he will wish to put his mark on a top-flight team himself. Given time, he would surely make a superlative manager, combining honesty, passion and a commitment to attacking football with inner strength and resolve. This is a man who knows how to win.

    We have been blessed to witness his career as one of the most poetic players of the past quarter of a century. We will be equally blessed to watch his development as a coach, manager and quiet innovator. As a player and as a human being, Scholes is one of the best.
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    Another excellent Scholes interview, thanks Mastermind. He comes across alot better and expressive in print interviews; probably down to the uncomfortable aspect of a camera in front of him, even it was Neville who was interviewing him. I think he'll have a break from the game as noted in the Neville interview that last time he retired, he jumped into working with the reserves and it drew him back but this time he'll have a rest.

    Valencia, I would keep for another year. He's had an absolutely poor campaign but maybe Moyes might coax the old player out of him but I'm sure his contract has got about two years left or so, but he's got a chance to get an extension.

    City's Yankees move is a branding and PR exercise, nothing more, nothing less. They've chosen a baseball team with history and a winning mentality, give them that.
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    (Original post by DH1')
    12/13 season review. Such a brilliant video.

    :moon:
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    So Rooney has a baby. Names him Klay. :facepalm2:
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    In other news, Mirror reporting that Rooney hasn't handed in a transfer request and is being forced out of the club. Also apparently SAF was considering a swap deal with City including him for none other than Joe Hart. The things they come out with...:lolwut:
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    That was a good video. And yeah, the newspapers are full of rubbish that is no new deal
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    Graham Hunter saying your on course to sign Thiago from Barca for £15m. If you pull that off, well I wouldn't know what to say...
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    (Original post by TheInvincibles14)
    Graham Hunter saying your on course to sign Thiago from Barca for £15m. If you pull that off, well I wouldn't know what to say...
    I will be severely disappointed if we let Thiago go. Would be a very good buy from your point of view.
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    We have had a serious lack of Spanish players at this club.
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    (Original post by cheetahs56)
    You're Ahmadi so sssssh.
    Who are you to tell me to "sssssh" just because of my faith? You just keep bringing up religion into this thread.

    If it's not Man Utd or football related then don't mention it.
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    (Original post by Tommyjw)
    We have had a serious lack of Spanish players at this club.
    Had a couple. Can't compare to German players though of which we've had hardly any
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    (Original post by Malevolent)
    I will be severely disappointed if we let Thiago go. Would be a very good buy from your point of view.
    Hmm yeah he's a promising player, maybe you should send him on loan somewhere? The £15m quoted is a ridiculous bargain for a player like Thiago. I've always thought of him as the long-term replacement for Iniesta.
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    (Original post by Sir Phillip Jones)
    Had a couple. Can't compare to German players though of which we've had hardly any
    De Gea and Pique, anyone else?
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    (Original post by TheInvincibles14)
    Hmm yeah he's a promising player, maybe you should send him on loan somewhere? The £15m quoted is a ridiculous bargain for a player like Thiago. I've always thought of him as the long-term replacement for Iniesta.
    Jeesh I always thought he would be the replacement for Iniesta or Xavi. Can't get my head round why they want to sell Thiago.
 
 
 
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