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    I have attempted a GCSE question from a past paper. I was wondering if someone could mark it for me and tell me what mark I would get for it. I have attached a link for the mark scheme below. Thanks.

    Compare the different ways in which language is used for effect in the two texts.
    Give some examples and analyse what the effects are. (16 marks)

    Both writers of sources 1 and 3 embed language techniques to help add to the overall effect of each piece. Source 1 is about a merry “225-mile trip” a family had “down the Colorado River.” Whereas in Source 3 we are too introduced to the theme of exploration, but instead of a reading a much more relaxed piece, this piece is more dramatic and serious.

    In the two sources, both writers set an instantaneous tone. In source 1 we see instant repetition of the rule "Stay in the boat." The writer uses the repetition to set an immediate tone of commands, which is different to the tone that is developed as the article progresses. Likewise in source 3, a tone is set instantly, but the set tone of tension and danger remains throughout the passage. The short sentence; "A decision was needed," is a tense, dramatic sentence which produces a sense of determination. Both of the writers use different techniques for the same effect, however although it is for the same effect (generating an immediate tone) a different tone is set for both pieces as two different rhetorical techniques have been used.

    Evocative language is used in both of the sources. Powerful imagery "of 6m rafts, masses of gear, an army of river guides scurrying about" gives us a sense of the camp being seemingly military. In source 3 the same technique is used by the writer, which too generates a powerful imagery. Hyperbolic vocabulary combined with alliteration increases the impact of evocative language in this source. The "surging snow" suggests the extreme danger she is being faced by. Therefore in both sources the same technique is used, but for the same effect, although in source 1 the evocative language is much more hyperbolic then the language used in source 3.

    The language used in Source 3 is more advanced than the language used in Source 1. Language such as “avalanche,” “crampons” and the names of individual places are advanced concepts, which may be undefined to people who have no interest in travelling. Therefore in Source 3 the writer has used more advanced terminology, as the non-fiction book was probably targeted at travel enthusiasts. In contrast, the writer of Source 1 uses much more basic terminology which suggests that it was targeted at the working class, who may have a very little understanding in travelling. Another difference in the pieces is their formality; source 3 has a very tense tone and the language is more advanced, making the piece more formal. Whereas Source 1 has a more light-hearted tone, the language is relaxed and there is some forms of slang, making it seem slightly informal.

    The use of facts and opinions is used more in Source 1 than in Source 3. The writer in source 1 uses opinions to explain her decisions. An example of this is: “You can’t be shy,” which suggests why she decided to socialise with the other travellers. However, in this source facts are also used to describe the journey. Source 3 however doesn’t use many opinions; instead it is comprised of facts – making it sound realistic.

    To sum up sources 1 and 3 imply a range of meanings through the language used. A much more relaxed approach in source 1 makes the journey seem merry, but in source 3 the journey is much more tense, dramatic and serious. Furthermore, the variety in sentence structure helps add to the tone of source 1, and the variety of factual information in source 3 enables the readers to believe that the journey is realistic and not fictional. Both writers have used language effectively to help communicate the overall meaning of each source.

    A link to the mark scheme is:

    http://store.aqa.org.uk/qual/gcse/qp...W-MS-JAN11.PDF

    It is question 4.
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    Anyone??


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    Couldn't see why it wouldn't get top marks, probably 14-16.

    The paragraph about 'advanced language', I just be a bit more specific, refer to the lexical choices made by whoever is writing it.

    Answered the question.
    Overall great analysis.
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    (Original post by letsbehonest)
    Couldn't see why it wouldn't get top marks, probably 14-16.

    The paragraph about 'advanced language', I just be a bit more specific, refer to the lexical choices made by whoever is writing it.

    Answered the question.
    Overall great analysis.
    Thanks, but what do you mean by lexical?


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    (Original post by kingaaran)
    Thanks, but what do you mean by lexical?


    Posted from TSR Mobile

    The writers lexis is the words he uses. Nothing fancy, sounds fancy though.

    You could also add in connotations of certain words, but I think you've got enough language techniques in there anyway.
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    (Original post by letsbehonest)
    The writers lexis is the words he uses. Nothing fancy, sounds fancy though.

    You could also add in connotations of certain words, but I think you've got enough language techniques in there anyway.
    Thanks. I will try to add some word connotations as well.


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    Guessing you saw the HCSW or whatever guy on Youtube as you used alot of the things he taught .
    Looking from my point, I'd say a 14; you just need to have one more thing which is "perceptive comments". You need to explain it a little more, I am going go an practise one now (on paper). Just keep trying and try to get a bigger story from it for the *.
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    (Original post by Xmarksthesh0t)
    Guessing you saw the HCSW or whatever guy on Youtube as you used alot of the things he taught .
    Looking from my point, I'd say a 14; you just need to have one more thing which is "perceptive comments". You need to explain it a little more, I am going go an practise one now (on paper). Just keep trying and try to get a bigger story from it for the *.
    14 marks, really?

    WeCanStudyEnglish is a great channel! I used all of his advice in the preparation of this response.

    I have edited the piece and added more perception - or I think I have. Thanks for the feedback and if you are taking the exam in January, Good Luck!!!
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    I am and here is my response, I did it within the time limit and I forgot all of what to do, but trust me you'd probs get a 15, I mark harsh so you can do even better . This is my frist try, I am going to do 10+ so I'd recon this will be around a 12 out of 16.

    I REPEAT THIS IS BAD! :P
    Q4)
    PLAN
    P1: Explain differences but some same laguage skills used in different ways/similar.
    P2: Dramatic language/Fun language- Contrast- 1st sentence
    P3: Evocative Language (try and use alllteration). Both same. Different conditions. Light hearte
    Dangerous billizard.
    P4: Technical Terms- contrast.
    Conclusion. Both have different effects... bla bla bla


    Both of these write about different things however the langauge skills used in some cases are
    same but maybe used in different ways. Source 1 is about Rafting on the Grand Canyon which
    much more a exciting/fun journey while Source 3 is about a very survivalist/left threating Journ


    Source 3 starts with “ A decision was needed”, this is very fast pasted and almost instantly gets
    reader engaged with the source, this is because this statement is very ambiguous and without
    knowing what it is, it could mean anything, left with the reader to only carry on to find out what
    means. Most of the sentences after this in the first paragraph are also short showing the fast p
    the speech and almost implying as if an out-of-breath quick explanation was intended. Source
    However starts of with “Just two rules!”. This sounds commanding however it as we read on th
    a used as humor, however both authors used the same language effect to grab the reader into
    story. Source 3 uses it to set a fast passed, decision/survival tone whilst source 1 makes it sou
    a fun and enjoyable tone.


    Source 1 has a lot evocative language such as “6m rafts, masses of gear”... This causes us th
    to imagine the and build a picture of source one's journey. Whilst, source 3 also uses the evoc
    language it is used very differently, it uses to give the reader the imgation of the dangers and d
    experinces by Pete such as “another big avalanche coming straight at me”. Both use it but in d
    ways. However both use the same language skill to bulid different images in the readers head.


    Finally, Source 3 uses a much wider amount of techinical terms such as “South Col” and “ Oxy
    cyliners”, so we know that this is aimed at people who know a lot about survival-ism or are in th
    however,Source 1 uses much more v
    ague language and is aimed at a much different wider range group. She does not explain the n
    the equipment but instead calls it “Gear” which is probably due to this being an article and bein
    by many different people.


    From what have learnt, we derive that source 1 is aimed a wider variety of people, it has a muc
    happier and light hearted tone and bulids a medium passed adventure into the mind of the rea
    a nice way, meanwhile, source 3 is aimed a much lower amount of people who are into surviva
    extreme sports; it has a much higher pace and it builds a high tense/ dangerous tone through t
    article.
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    (Original post by kingaaran)
    I have attempted a GCSE question from a past paper. I was wondering if someone could mark it for me and tell me what mark I would get for it. I have attached a link for the mark scheme below. Thanks.

    Compare the different ways in which language is used for effect in the two texts.
    Give some examples and analyse what the effects are. (16 marks)

    Both writers of sources 1 and 3 embed language techniques to help add to the overall effect of each piece. Source 1 is about a merry “225-mile trip” a family had “down the Colorado River.” Whereas in Source 3 we are too introduced to the theme of exploration, but instead of a reading a much more relaxed piece, this piece is more dramatic and serious.

    In the two sources, both writers set an instantaneous tone. In source 1 we see instant repetition of the rule "Stay in the boat." The writer uses the repetition to set an immediate tone of commands, which is different to the tone that is developed as the article progresses. Likewise in source 3, a tone is set instantly, but the set tone of tension and danger remains throughout the passage. The short sentence; "A decision was needed," is a tense, dramatic sentence which produces a sense of determination. Both of the writers use different techniques for the same effect, however although it is for the same effect (generating an immediate tone) a different tone is set for both pieces as two different rhetorical techniques have been used.

    Evocative language is used in both of the sources. Powerful imagery "of 6m rafts, masses of gear, an army of river guides scurrying about" gives us a sense of the camp being seemingly military. In source 3 the same technique is used by the writer, which too generates a powerful imagery. Hyperbolic vocabulary combined with alliteration increases the impact of evocative language in this source. The "surging snow" suggests the extreme danger she is being faced by. Therefore in both sources the same technique is used, but for the same effect, although in source 1 the evocative language is much more hyperbolic then the language used in source 3.

    The language used in Source 3 is more advanced than the language used in Source 1. Language such as “avalanche,” “crampons” and the names of individual places are advanced concepts, which may be undefined to people who have no interest in travelling. Therefore in Source 3 the writer has used more advanced terminology, as the non-fiction book was probably targeted at travel enthusiasts. In contrast, the writer of Source 1 uses much more basic terminology which suggests that it was targeted at the working class, who may have a very little understanding in travelling. Another difference in the pieces is their formality; source 3 has a very tense tone and the language is more advanced, making the piece more formal. Whereas Source 1 has a more light-hearted tone, the language is relaxed and there is some forms of slang, making it seem slightly informal.

    The use of facts and opinions is used more in Source 1 than in Source 3. The writer in source 1 uses opinions to explain her decisions. An example of this is: “You can’t be shy,” which suggests why she decided to socialise with the other travellers. However, in this source facts are also used to describe the journey. Source 3 however doesn’t use many opinions; instead it is comprised of facts – making it sound realistic.

    To sum up sources 1 and 3 imply a range of meanings through the language used. A much more relaxed approach in source 1 makes the journey seem merry, but in source 3 the journey is much more tense, dramatic and serious. Furthermore, the variety in sentence structure helps add to the tone of source 1, and the variety of factual information in source 3 enables the readers to believe that the journey is realistic and not fictional. Both writers have used language effectively to help communicate the overall meaning of each source.

    A link to the mark scheme is:

    http://store.aqa.org.uk/qual/gcse/qp...W-MS-JAN11.PDF

    It is question 4.
    Wow! I love this answer as you have thoroughly explained not only the language techniques employed by the author, but you have also analysed the impact of the reader. In addition to this, you compared the two texts incredibly well. I am taking the English exam on the 4th June (26 days away) and would like to thank you for submitting this answer as it has given me an example a* response to give me ideas.
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    (Original post by kingaaran)
    Anyone??


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    this is good but I think you need to structure it better - for example you could be more direct with your points - when you talk about tone you link in other things and it gets confusing! Just mention the technique, the connotation, and then the same for the other point. Would make everything read better
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    (Original post by kingaaran)
    Thanks. I will try to add some word connotations as well.


    Posted from TSR Mobile

    hey what sort of topics can you talk about for q4 english lang on comparing texts? what about this so far:

    tone, vocabulary, advanced or not, facts/opinions, mood?

    what else?
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    (Original post by kingaaran)
    I have attempted a GCSE question from a past paper. I was wondering if someone could mark it for me and tell me what mark I would get for it. I have attached a link for the mark scheme below. Thanks.

    Compare the different ways in which language is used for effect in the two texts.
    Give some examples and analyse what the effects are. (16 marks)

    Both writers of sources 1 and 3 embed language techniques to help add to the overall effect of each piece. Source 1 is about a merry “225-mile trip” a family had “down the Colorado River.” Whereas in Source 3 we are too introduced to the theme of exploration, but instead of a reading a much more relaxed piece, this piece is more dramatic and serious.

    In the two sources, both writers set an instantaneous tone. In source 1 we see instant repetition of the rule "Stay in the boat." The writer uses the repetition to set an immediate tone of commands, which is different to the tone that is developed as the article progresses. Likewise in source 3, a tone is set instantly, but the set tone of tension and danger remains throughout the passage. The short sentence; "A decision was needed," is a tense, dramatic sentence which produces a sense of determination. Both of the writers use different techniques for the same effect, however although it is for the same effect (generating an immediate tone) a different tone is set for both pieces as two different rhetorical techniques have been used.

    Evocative language is used in both of the sources. Powerful imagery "of 6m rafts, masses of gear, an army of river guides scurrying about" gives us a sense of the camp being seemingly military. In source 3 the same technique is used by the writer, which too generates a powerful imagery. Hyperbolic vocabulary combined with alliteration increases the impact of evocative language in this source. The "surging snow" suggests the extreme danger she is being faced by. Therefore in both sources the same technique is used, but for the same effect, although in source 1 the evocative language is much more hyperbolic then the language used in source 3.

    The language used in Source 3 is more advanced than the language used in Source 1. Language such as “avalanche,” “crampons” and the names of individual places are advanced concepts, which may be undefined to people who have no interest in travelling. Therefore in Source 3 the writer has used more advanced terminology, as the non-fiction book was probably targeted at travel enthusiasts. In contrast, the writer of Source 1 uses much more basic terminology which suggests that it was targeted at the working class, who may have a very little understanding in travelling. Another difference in the pieces is their formality; source 3 has a very tense tone and the language is more advanced, making the piece more formal. Whereas Source 1 has a more light-hearted tone, the language is relaxed and there is some forms of slang, making it seem slightly informal.

    The use of facts and opinions is used more in Source 1 than in Source 3. The writer in source 1 uses opinions to explain her decisions. An example of this is: “You can’t be shy,” which suggests why she decided to socialise with the other travellers. However, in this source facts are also used to describe the journey. Source 3 however doesn’t use many opinions; instead it is comprised of facts – making it sound realistic.

    To sum up sources 1 and 3 imply a range of meanings through the language used. A much more relaxed approach in source 1 makes the journey seem merry, but in source 3 the journey is much more tense, dramatic and serious. Furthermore, the variety in sentence structure helps add to the tone of source 1, and the variety of factual information in source 3 enables the readers to believe that the journey is realistic and not fictional. Both writers have used language effectively to help communicate the overall meaning of each source.

    A link to the mark scheme is:

    http://store.aqa.org.uk/qual/gcse/qp...W-MS-JAN11.PDF

    It is question 4.

    I went through the mark scheme, although they are very difficult. I would give your question 10-12 marks. It is difficult because 3 marks are for SPAG and obviously it is hard to mark for it when the answer has been typed. Try to add more detail and I would say make your answer more developed and long; remember you have over 25 minutes for this question.
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    Source 2 isan article explaining the devious ways of a panda who faked a pregnancy whereassource 3 is a personal account of a women’s encounter with Gorillas during her tripto Uganda.
    In source 3, thewriter uses a pattern of three to describe the scenery; ‘the tea plants,tropical trees, and flowers’. This list is used to ensure the reader can gathera vivid image of the scenery, and it emphasizes its beauty. Similarly, apattern of three is used in source 2 to describe the actions of the panda who ‘showedreduced appetite, less mobility and a surge in hormones’. Here the list has adifferent effect, as it is an informative article, so is used to inform thereader of the pandas symptoms, and ensure they fully understand the situation.

    Source 2 uses longand complex sentence types, as it is clear this article is aimed at adults.This has an informative effect, and creates a formal tone to the writing. Source3, however, uses a range of sentences, including many simple sentences forexample, ‘I nod’. This creates tension and suspense, with the effect of intriguingand engaging the reader with the writer’s emotions.

    The panda isdescribed to be the ‘star of the show’, which is a cliché used to describesomeone who seeks attention and is very self obsessed. The cliché is used toensure the reader can relate the the text and clearly understand the situation.However, a panda, clearly is not clever enough to experience such emotions,therefore this is a form of hyperbole, which has the effect of emphasizing theabnormality of the situation as well as intriguing the reader. The writer insource 3 explains that her ‘butt drops to the ground like a magnet’. This is asimile, with a similar effect of emphasizing the intensity of her experience.It is also used to help the reader understand the description better and beable to relate to it.
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    ^I know that it isn't a full answer (I got bored) but can someone please mark it? Q4 november 2015
 
 
 
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