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Which is worse: being a mummy's boy or a daddy's girl? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Which is worse?
    Mummy's boy
    45.10%
    Daddy's girl
    17.65%
    Both are equally bad
    37.25%

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    (Original post by WildBerrySpirit)
    I'd say both.
    why?
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    I don't think they're bad, I'm a bit of a "daddy's girl" and I don't mind it,


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    (Original post by Lawstudent321)
    I don't think they're bad, I'm a bit of a "daddy's girl" and I don't mind it,


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    i am sure you wouldn't mind it. you get bought expensive stuff with daddy's money!
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    Mummy's boy definitely.

    I've just about shaken off all the cotton wool I've been wrapped in as a result of being raised by a single mum, but boy has it taken a long time. Doesn't help that she acts like she's one fry short of a happy meal sometimes but that's another story entirely.
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    Of course it's not bad to be especially close to one of your parents (most people are), but I think I know what you mean.
    The stereotype of a mummy's boy is a feminine, emotional, stupid guy who acts like he's 12 and runs to mum every time there is a problem. The stereotype of a daddy's girl is a spoiled girl who gets everything she points at and is used to getting things her way (especially financially).
    I know a few of both, and from a dating perspective, I do find mummy's boys a tad worse. That is because it is not just the guy himself that is the problem, but the mum too. And territorial women can make dating impossible. They can be uncomfortably (physically) affectionate and not want to "share" their sons. At worst, dads are protective. It is also the factor that mummy's boys are lacking in masculinity. Daddy's girls are not lacking in femininity, they are just way too entitled. However, they can lose that entitlement, more easily than mummy's boys can suddenly become men.
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    (Original post by Rascacielos)
    I don't think either are necessarily bad and, if they are, certainly one is not worse than the other. Of course it's bad to be attached to your parents' apron strings and not have the independence to live your own life, but I don't think that means you can't be very close to either.

    I am extremely close to my Mum (which I know doesn't make me either a Mummy's boy or a Daddy's girl - but just as an example), in fact I'm closer to her than I am to anyone else. But at the same time, my parents have brought me up to the point where they describe me as 'fiercely independent'. I've always hated my parents doing things for me which I'm perfectly capable of doing myself; I only come from university because I like seeing my parents, but not because I get homesick to the point of needing to come home; and I've been able to cook for myself since I was about 8.

    So in answer to your question, OP, I think it can be bad to be too attached to your parents, but I don't think it's particularly bad to be either a Mummy's boy or a Daddy's girl, as long as that doesn't define your whole personality.
    that's not strictly a mummy's boy/girl though.

    Mummy's boys are incapable of doing things themselves, they don't iron or cook for themselves, don't clean up after themselves, - think Howard from big bang theory. Their mother treats them like a young child and they show no inclination to change or gain independence
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    (Original post by silverbolt)
    that's not strictly a mummy's boy/girl though.

    Mummy's boys are incapable of doing things themselves, they don't iron or cook for themselves, don't clean up after themselves, - think Howard from big bang theory. Their mother treats them like a young child and they show no inclination to change or gain independence
    I don't watch the Big Bang Theory enough to know who Howard is.

    I always took 'Mummy's boy' to mean a boy who is quite clingy to his Mum principally, and the not ironing/cooking/cleaning generally comes as a consequence of that.
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    (Original post by Rascacielos)
    I don't watch the Big Bang Theory enough to know who Howard is.

    I always took 'Mummy's boy' to mean a boy who is quite clingy to his Mum principally, and the not ironing/cooking/cleaning generally comes as a consequence of that.
    Its a two way thing sometimes as well, the mother is domineering and plays far to heavily in her sons life, it can make dating them a nightmare as you end up butting heads with them for the affections of thier son
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    (Original post by silverbolt)
    Its a two way thing sometimes as well, the mother is domineering and plays far to heavily in her sons life, it can make dating them a nightmare as you end up butting heads with them for the affections of thier son
    Well, of course. It must be partly the mother's/father's fault for their child being overly attached.
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    I once had a boyfriend who was SUCH a mummy's boy it was ridiculous. It can be quite cute, but both examples taken to extremes are equally annoying...
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    (Original post by lauraaaa.xo)
    I would say a mummys boy because it's not really seen as a cool thing, especially as you get older. A daddy's girl, yes is probably a spoilt brat but hey she gets stuff haha.
    I agree!
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    I really don't think either is particularly bad =/ plus I think you'll find most girls, at least the ones I know, end up as daddys girls just because girls and mums argue, especially once they move away from home, Dad is often the voice of reason.
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    I wouldn't place blame on a boy who is tied to his Mum, generally there will be past reasons in his upbringing that make him too clingy or whatever, so it's not exactly his "fault", but I wouldn't feel that I would want to be his g/f, mainly due to the competition, I feel more comfortable with independent-minded boys, but there's a happy balance - you can still have supportive parents and be close and that's fine. There's a lot of judging in questions like this and unless you've lived someone else's life....
 
 
 
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