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    Hi! I'm first year IB student and I am interested in studying law at university. It has sparked an interest in me from a young age but I don't have a very good knowledge of it and want to find out more information about it. I am a fairly all rounded student, I think I did fairly well in my gcse's (3A* 3A's 3B's and 3's) but I would like to know from someone who is currently studying or has studied law if they think that I would be capable of it studying it. Is the course demanding? What kind of lifestyle is needed from the student etc?




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    my cousin does law at dundee and he said its a lot harder than alevel
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    I like to think it is, just like all other subjects are harder at degree level than at any level before. Do they like it?


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    Lots of reading, but very enjoyable. Of course, there are boring modules in it, but then that's the same with any course. Overall, i'd say it's well worth it.

    If possible, i'd definitely suggest taking it at A-level before hand if possible.
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    I don't take A levels. I'm an IB student, and the IB doesn't offer Law as a subject


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    More reading than other Arts an Humanities subjects and probably a higher chance you find something bit dull, due to qualifying system, but this also means you sometimes find you really enjoy modules you weren't expecting to. I like that you get to improve so much though the course, as most have never studied it before.

    I don't think the lifestyle is vastly different to any other subject, I know lots of Law students who are fully involved in sport, music, politics etc. at uni. It's not like some professional courses (Medicine, Nursing etc.) where you have essentially a 9-5 job with commuting and everything.
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    (Original post by roh)
    More reading than other Arts an Humanities subjects and probably a higher chance you find something bit dull, due to qualifying system, but this also means you sometimes find you really enjoy modules you weren't expecting to. I like that you get to improve so much though the course, as most have never studied it before.

    I don't think the lifestyle is vastly different to any other subject, I know lots of Law students who are fully involved in sport, music, politics etc. at uni. It's not like some professional courses (Medicine, Nursing etc.) where you have essentially a 9-5 job with commuting and everything.
    Thank you for the post! Its helped a lot!


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    I am currently an undergraduate in Law at University of Manchester. In my final year.

    I agree that the course has some very interesting modules (criminal law, jurisprudence, Intellectual property law) and other ones where I was literally falling asleep in the class (Equity and Trusts, Land Law).

    Law is the hardest subject to get a 1sts in. Most subjects have around 15% - 30% getting 1sts (ok, the 30% end is in the subjects which are really really...y'know, you laugh at them being a university course and are the same graduates that complain about why they are not getting a job with it...).

    On average only 6% get a 1sts in Law.

    The grade you get in Law is directly proportional to the amount of reading you do, there is a lot of reading, but you will gradually learn how to skim to the important parts. Judgements can be very long to read. When I first started Law I felt like i had to read the whole thing. But now I have read so many cases that I will skim read through one and if i see a phrase, or a change in tone something, then I will home in on it like a ratio decendi seeking missile (google that latin if you don't know it). This subject is very difficult. There is a reason why they set the grade boundaries so high and there is a reason why Lawyers get paid so much. You're having to directly comprehend the judgements of some of the most intelligent people in the land (the house of lords/supreme court judges). I took this subject because I felt it would stretch me. It has. Sometimes I will crack open my archive of past essays and find myself asking "Did I really write that?" - but then I forget the high pressure intense circumstances I was in. A week before my essay was due to be submitted, I would lock myself away, turn off my phone and my focus would reach another level as I would try to give my essay that deeper edge. So when I look back, I do get a lot of satisfaction - there is a bigger scope at university to allow your mind to go to places where you did not think possible. At sixth form college and GCSE, obviously it is a lot different. You have a rigidly set sylabus and you just have to focus on nailing down the essentials, make sure you include the evaluative section (the Level 4 hoop) at the end and bam your examiner has to give you your A grade. (I don't know exactly what criteria IB follows with regards marking, but i cannot imagine it is a lot different. Uni is a lot more about rewarding the hard workers and severely punishing the slackers. If you've not done the work, it will stick out like a sore thumb and the examiner is left wondering if he is really feeling sympathetic enough to give you a 3rds or a straight up fail lol whereas if you've done the work and a whole lot extra, it will also be very clear and the examiner just rains down the distinctions upon you.

    You cannot come to university to do Law and expect to be going out 3-4 times a week. You just cannot. You can only really go out on a friday night so you can use saturday to shake off the hangover, and sunday to prepare for the next week of work. There may be circumstances whereby your timetable only has you working 4 days a week, so you can use whatever weekday student night on the night prior to your particular week day off. You have to get up and attend all your lectures - especially the 9am ones (i have found that the lecturer purposefully drops the biggest exam hints in the 9am lectures, trust me, it is no coincidence). You have to be great at note-taking (though my secret was just to record the lecture and do a better set of notes later).

    In my 1st year of university, I remember I had a certain group of course-mate friends. By the time I reached the end of 2nd year, 4 of the 5 had dropped out along the way. Countless others I know have had to retake the year. Many got swept up by the university lifestyle. Felt compelled to indulge overly in their social circles for fear of losing them and their uni work suffered dramatically. University is a place where you grow up more so than a place to study for most people (it has been for me in many ways, only now at the start of my 3rd year have I felt like I have got a firm grip), if it hadn't been for my intellect, I would have most surely have been kicked out like the rest but I managed to scrape through.

    Obviously those who have already had to do a lot of growing up before they reached here tend to do a lot better. They will sail through university, because their energies are focused on their studies, not on learning how to adapt to a completely different life - one without parents, without rules, without punishments - learning to do well off the back of your own self-motivation and nothing else.
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    Don't study law if you want to be a lawyer. Very unfashionable these days. Just do an undergrad underwater basket weaving and convert.
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    (Original post by naruto69r)
    Law is the hardest subject to get a 1sts in. Most subjects have around 15% - 30% getting 1sts (ok, the 30% end is in the subjects which are really really...y'know, you laugh at them being a university course and are the same graduates that complain about why they are not getting a job with it...).

    On average only 6% get a 1sts in Law.
    Like...Maths?

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/...concern-update

    You have to get up and attend all your lectures - especially the 9am ones (i have found that the lecturer purposefully drops the biggest exam hints in the 9am lectures, trust me, it is no coincidence). You have to be great at note-taking (though my secret was just to record the lecture and do a better set of notes later).
    Most of this is brilliant advice, but I think this bit is debatable,. I know lots of lawyers who get Firsts and high 2.1s by only attending those lectures they find useful. If you have a lecturer who's really **** and sends you to sleep I think it's sometimes more of a waste of time to attend their lectures 3 times a week than spend another 3 hours reading in the library.

    Also, though I agree Law is tough, I think there are subjects which are considerably harder in terms of workload and the hours expected of you.
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    Ah yes, I think that's the article I read roh

    You did jog my memory a little. I did remember being shocked so many people could get a 1sts in Maths. Is that because Maths is a subject whereby there is in fact a right and a wrong answer? I honestly would not know. I don't like to compare degrees with each other over which are "better". I've seen heated debates on the internet before and think its utterly ridiculous. I personally think Law is a fake degree compared to others, but that does not stop whomever I disclose my area of study to from reacting with a wide mouthed "Ooooooooh", Law benefits from a powerful prestigious image, unfortunately that is the sole reason why some rather insecure but intelligent people go for it as a subject.

    Yeah, each to their own method of study. I've been diagnosed with dyslexia and I find it very difficult to process my thoughts in to words on a page in a reasonable time (short term memory deficiency is what I was told) so when my lecturer is firing his analysis at me, I am unable to keep up, so with a recording I can go over it 5-6 times before I finally get it. Paradoxically, once I "get it", it is extremely easy to recall even when many months have passed.

    And what StudentPride said is actually good advice in essence. Study what you enjoy, and then convert if you want to do Law. It is only a year doing the GDL. Though, if you're not academic enough to begin with and you do a "doss" subject at university - I would hesitate over whether you would pass the GDL. GDL is very intensive. I believe Tort, Contract, Land Law, Equity & Trusts, EU Law and Criminal Law are the 6 modules to take in GDL? I am going off by heart. Apart from Criminal Law and Contract, I found the other 4 modules extremely dry (i found it difficult to motivate myself at times to open a book due to their dryness). Contract was dry, but it is so relevant you feel compelled to read. I am still referring to my contract law text book 2 years later over a current contractual dispute I am having with my gym. They are claiming 3 months of unpaid membership and I am prepared to counter-claim (genuinely) on the basis of misrepresentation (it seems though, after my threat, they have now backed down). If I had to do all those at once in a single year, it would have been difficult to stomach if I had not already been thrown in to the deep end with a more difficult academic subject.
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    (Original post by naruto69r)
    Ah yes, I think that's the article I read roh

    You did jog my memory a little. I did remember being shocked so many people could get a 1sts in Maths. Is that because Maths is a subject whereby there is in fact a right and a wrong answer? I honestly would not know. I don't like to compare degrees with each other over which are "better". I've seen heated debates on the internet before and think its utterly ridiculous. I personally think Law is a fake degree compared to others, but that does not stop whomever I disclose my area of study to from reacting with a wide mouthed "Ooooooooh", Law benefits from a powerful prestigious image, unfortunately that is the sole reason why some rather insecure but intelligent people go for it as a subject.
    I think so. Talking to mates who do science they sometimes get up to 90 in a module, as if you keep getting stuff right they just have to give you the marks, so it's easier to 'stockpile' marks in your strong modules, whereas Law it tends to be that anything above 75 is rare so you need to consistently hit 70 plus.

    Agreed!

    Yeah, each to their own method of study. I've been diagnosed with dyslexia and I find it very difficult to process my thoughts in to words on a page in a reasonable time (short term memory deficiency is what I was told) so when my lecturer is firing his analysis at me, I am unable to keep up, so with a recording I can go over it 5-6 times before I finally get it. Paradoxically, once I "get it", it is extremely easy to recall even when many months have passed.
    Ah OK, fair enough, I just find if they're dull I drift off and a good textbook is more useful.

    And what StudentPride said is actually good advice in essence. Study what you enjoy, and then convert if you want to do Law. It is only a year doing the GDL. Though, if you're not academic enough to begin with and you do a "doss" subject at university - I would hesitate over whether you would pass the GDL. GDL is very intensive. I believe Tort, Contract, Land Law, Equity & Trusts, EU Law and Criminal Law are the 6 modules to take in GDL? I am going off by heart. Apart from Criminal Law and Contract, I found the other 4 modules extremely dry (i found it difficult to motivate myself at times to open a book due to their dryness).
    They have to do Public as well. Agreed it must be tough, particularly given they build on each other to an extent, I can't imagine having to do Land having never done Contract.
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    Oh so 7 modules? I'll have to look this up. With Public Law I did not buy a single textbook and I only attended the 1st lecture. Upon receiving the syllabus and checking the past papers, it quickly became apparent that I was going to be able to use all my Politics A-Level knowledge. We had to do 2 Public Law modules, one in january and one in summer, it was very satisfying being able to walk out with high 2:1's in both having done virtually nothing. And you are right about Land Law, not being able to be done without contract. I remember attending a presentation for this Pathways to Law initiative I am a mentor on, and the admin of the initiative was a solicitor herself and she made a statement at the start: "in my opinion, all Law is based on contract law" - for such a concise statement, its an incredibly powerful point as you can tell from the fact I still have not forgotten it!

    Im sorry I realise I missed your point about the dull lecturers, with a good textbook being more useful. I do agree. Even so, it would have taken a highly charismatic and innovative lecturer to be able to spice up the "6 steps to Land registration" (i think it was 6 lol)...dear god, if the ceiling broke in half and a shower of cyanide came raining down on us we would have rejoiced!
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    Do you want to study law or have a successful career in law?
    My advice would be to get some experience at a solicitors/law firm to see if that's the kind of job/working environment you'd enjoy. Plus experience in law is key to future job prospects (and GDL sponsorship).
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    (Original post by naruto69r)
    Oh so 7 modules? I'll have to look this up. With Public Law I did not buy a single textbook and I only attended the 1st lecture. Upon receiving the syllabus and checking the past papers, it quickly became apparent that I was going to be able to use all my Politics A-Level knowledge. We had to do 2 Public Law modules, one in january and one in summer, it was very satisfying being able to walk out with high 2:1's in both having done virtually nothing. And you are right about Land Law, not being able to be done without contract. I remember attending a presentation for this Pathways to Law initiative I am a mentor on, and the admin of the initiative was a solicitor herself and she made a statement at the start: "in my opinion, all Law is based on contract law" - for such a concise statement, its an incredibly powerful point as you can tell from the fact I still have not forgotten it!

    Im sorry I realise I missed your point about the dull lecturers, with a good textbook being more useful. I do agree. Even so, it would have taken a highly charismatic and innovative lecturer to be able to spice up the "6 steps to Land registration" (i think it was 6 lol)...dear god, if the ceiling broke in half and a shower of cyanide came raining down on us we would have rejoiced!
    That is true. I did a year abroad in France, and their massive love of Philosophy means half the time is spent discussing what Law is, contract came up a lot! Saying that, I found it an absolute tede in first year, much preferred Tort.

    Ours was the 3 certainties in Equity, you looked around and everyone was so bored they looked like zombies.
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    Haven't read the replies above. I left college at 18 with a Btec in Performing Arts. Went back to uni 7 years later and commenced LLB (Hons) Law full time. I love reading and a good story therefore thoroughly enjoyed reading journal articles and case law. I graduated with a first.... I hadn't studied law at GCSE or A Level and it didn't do me any harm. Just had to put in a lot of hard work. If you want something bad enough you will find a way, if you don't, you'll find an excuse Good luck x
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    can you teach Law A-levels, University students and living in manchester, quote me please.
 
 
 
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