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    Basically, I want to study abroad because It would be generally more exciting than the UK and I would also like to avoid starting my life in 27000 pounds worth of debt. What well thought of universities would you recommend with a range of English speaking courses which has cheap tuition fees? and how would I apply? Holland is preferable. Are there loans/grants available like in the UK?


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    I always say to people why do ask of Loans when the whole reason you left the UK in the first place was to avoid a massive pile of debt? However, if you must know you can get your 1771 euro a year tuition fee loaned to you by the Dutch government. No living costs covered for I'm afraid as that's not in the EU's same treatment policy. With the Dutch government you have to work 32 hours a month and then You get what the Dutch people get if you're from the EU. However not knowing the language will mean you probably won't get one + the the university schedule is really intense so I doubt you'd have time anyway for one even if you wanted to. I know I don't!

    But in terms of universities there's Eindhoven University of Technology (not to be confused with Fontys Eindhoven which is a branch of UK equivalent polytechnics <----- don't go there please or any other hogeschool in the Netherlands as for that matter of fact.) has a few and is where I go - other ones are TU Delft. Non technical ones include Maastricht, Groningen and of course Amsterdam - but there are a few there so make sure you choose the decent one out of all of those - also Utrecht.
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    Well, I don't think 30000 pounds of debt is quite the same as around 5000. But, just out of interest.. What course are you studying? Also, what did you have to do to get in? Because the university websites aren't very clear. They just say you need a high school diploma. Does this mean I just have to have finished my education and as long as I passed grades don't matter?
    And would you say you enjoy your time in holland? Are the cities other than Amsterdam worth living in?


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    I am studying Computer Science and am doing a joint degree thingy which isn't really joint but yeah - software science and web science. In order to get in the eindhoven website states a minimum of an A at A level maths (and for the other courses also an A at A Level Physics (but I was never any good at physics so thank God they didn't require physics for computer science). If they haven't got any requirements such as these then they do say high school diploma indeed.

    For me I had to "pass" all my other subjects which in their eyes was getting at least a C in all the other A-Levels I was doing. So probably they mean that - reason being is that they a) want more international students to increase tneir reputation and b) the EU's fair access policy means they are obliged to take you with the minimum requirements to get in to university in one's home country. That should mean you can get in with all E's and sometimes you can - which also doesn't make it a bad university - the Dutch students have it much tougher :P

    So yes if you have all above C's then you're definitely safe

    And hmmm.... well.... I would say some cities are, Eindhoven not being one of them. big cities such as Maastricht and Rotterdam are but Eindhoven is more like a futuristic hi-tech village than a city as such for me anyway. Rotterdam (so Delft) and Maastricht are your best bets there. But the advantage for me comared to London was a queit and nice city like Eindhoven - it's very peaceful so it depends what you prefer. Amsterdam - pretty much just London scaled down a bit with plenty to do.

    But if you do go for one of the smaller cities then check how you would get there also:

    Eindhoven has it's own airport with direct links to london stansted and also your parents could drive you (if they're feeling brave )but if you go to delft or amsterdam there's always the train. And also eurolines for some cities. Because you'd need to go home once in a while and that's also an important deciscion factor.
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    You're such a helpful man! Thanks! What's the workload like? How many hours of lectures do you have a week and what sort of times are the lectures in the day? Also, how many different nationalities are there, there? That's the thing that excites me most about studying abroad!


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    The workload is... well it depends how you want to view it so I'll just lay out the facts (this is my university and I have no clue if others are the same but I gather that they should be, if differing on time slots):

    - lessons on 5 days of the week Monday to Friday
    - Each day is from 8:30 - 17:30
    - Lectures/Practicals come in pairs of two hours with a 15 minute break at the start of each hour so slots are:
    - 8:45-10:30
    - 10:45-12:30
    - one hour for lunch
    -13:45-15:30
    -15:45-17:30

    Having said that if you do a normal (non double degree) you have 3 subjects per term. These require 8 hours per week of lectures/practicals each, so 4 timeslots per week are allocated per subject. That means you'll have another 16 timesolts or 2 days off do do other stuff. In some quartiles you may however find that one subject takes up 2 subject time slots so 16 hours per week will be allocated instead of 8 Apart from that there's none of this "first year = morning lectures". They are literally just time slots which are allocated based on another system but all in all pretty random.

    Then there is alsoo the recommended 8 hours self study per week per subject. And this does extremely depend on the subject you're doing! In the first quartile one of them was calculus which was pretty much A-Level maths so pretty much nobody did any work outside of lectures. But for otherones you'll probably be doing WHEY more than 8 hours study (which I'm still mad about tbh but hey)

    In general the wotkload I find is pretty tough if you want to pass all your courses. I do see people all around me who don't bother but apparantly that's why in the second year over half the people don't come back (so don't be one of them ). You really do need to study hard, but as long as you attend all the lectures and practicals planned then you're most likely to be alright.

    Also - your school year. I started at the start of september. Pretty much like schools in the UK. Also be excited for intro week(s) before that - they're pretty awesome . Per year you have 4 quartiles with 2 in a term. Then you have 7 weeks education. 1 week to revise. Then 2 weeks allocated for the exam throughout which you can revise for the 3 or how ever many you may have. Then after the 2 weeks it's straight into the next quartile. 2 weeks christmas holidays come during the second quartile (which means you have to (or not ) study during the christmas break. Long weekend for easter and that's about it until the beggining of July.

    So from all that I can say I really enjoy the system - you get LOADS for your money and think they really grill you hard (which as I know from myself without I could never actually do work). There's weekly tests or homework to make sure you are on track combined with intermediate half way through quartile mini tests or exams for some subjects. As I'm doing a technical subject no coursework mind you but that could vary in other programmes.

    ^^So that's about the education system. And then we get to the internationalism part. I found that because there aren't many bachelor programmes conducted in English in the Netherlands foreign bachelor students are limited in number. There are a lot of foreign students (about 200 this year at my university but out of those only approximatley 20 came for bachelor courses. Of those 7 were in my program actually so it wasn't a bad turn out compared to other courses. Of course these are the first people you tend to talk to but you'll definitely make friends with the Dutch students also soon enough (it'll be clearly seen who wants to be international students friends and who don't).

    Types of nationalities are mainly non EU which suprised me really. You've got Iran, Singapore, India, Pakistan, China. But also countries like Romania and Bulgaria. Mind you for MASTERS programs ther were significantly more greeks and mexicans than anybody else. Also the USA aswell, 2 people - one masters' and the other bachelors' this year. I had one other english person with me this year but not doing my particular degree programme.

    So there really are a lot of people to meet and the way it's done also meant that I was instantly integrated with the Dutch people straight away at the intro week so that way you also make a few aquaintances. And it is genuinely exciting! + If you really wanted to go "abroad abroad" then you could even do a year abroad - next year I shall be going to China which will be something.

    Long post but I'm only happy to help as I think the move abroad is something not publicised enough (well duh they want your money - god Stan! Think!)
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    search TSR for University College Utrecht, Maastricht, Amsterdam...there are a few threads on studying in the Netherlands and on these three-year selective college programs, which could be interesting depending on your grades - but move quickly, I think application deadline is Feb 1.
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    Hi hardworking andy,

    There is little I can add to what has already been thoroughly covered by StanRogo, so thanks for saving me a job, haha!

    Where in the UK are you located? If you are in reach of Leeds or London, on the weekend of March 16th, we will be hosting our Spring Study Abroad Fair. This will allow for you to meet and talk to approximately 13/14 representatives from The Netherlands, who can answer any specific questions you have regarding each of the institutions.

    Please visit our website to find out more about studying in The Netherlands and its institutions.

    Kind regards,

    Student World Team
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    The amount of time spend in class will depend on your degree course, what are you looking to do?

    (I'm currently on an Erasmus exchange programme in the Netherlands).
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    (Original post by hardworking andy)
    Basically, I want to study abroad because It would be generally more exciting than the UK and I would also like to avoid starting my life in 27000 pounds worth of debt. What well thought of universities would you recommend with a range of English speaking courses which has cheap tuition fees? and how would I apply? Holland is preferable. Are there loans/grants available like in the UK?


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    Learn German, go to Germany. Close to free education.

    you will have to pay living expenses in ANY country, so thats not that big a deal. And I'm sure it can't be too much...

    Other than the tuition advantage, the other big advantage could be that they are economically better off right now, as in the economy is not in a $hit-shape like uk.

    And there's many other cool countries in europe. Majority of the people in uk are just so anti-europe, I don't know why...especially anti-german. Maybe uk is just jealous of germany.
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    I'm looking to do either a business related course or history. Both interest me equally.. Can't decide though! I've applied for business in the UK, mainly because the entry requirements were lower.


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    (Original post by hardworking andy)
    I'm looking to do either a business related course or history. Both interest me equally.. Can't decide though! I've applied for business in the UK, mainly because the entry requirements were lower.


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    hei

    I study at Maastricht University. Here they have a really good International Business degree. However, DUO ( the institution related to educational placements in NL) organizes a selection process for this BA. I don't know what your A levels are but usually for this program they also look at what you've done outside school. So the projects you were involved in. I think its nice because you are no just a number as you are for most other universities when you apply.

    About history there is also a BA called Arts and Culture which deals with a lot of humanities including philosophy, arts. If your interested in European Union affairs there is also European Studies and that deals with EU history. The requirements for these 2 last BAs are way lower.

    Check the Maastricht University website, they give a lot of info.

    About life in NL i can only say about Maastricht. It is small but is a vivid student city with a lot of internationals. For me was important as well to meet students coming from a wise variety of countries. The university is dominated by internationals and everyone, even the bus drivers speak English, so no pbs with Dutch.

    Let me know if you need more help!
    I d advice Maastricht overall though.

    cheers
 
 
 
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