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    Anybody have any recommendations of worthwhile books about the process of learning, the education system, the job of teaching, etc? Which books helped you teach better?
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    look on the TES website. They give a lot of suggestions there
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    (Original post by Kolya)
    Anybody have any recommendations of worthwhile books about the process of learning, the education system, the job of teaching, etc? Which books helped you teach better?
    Books in teacher training are valuable as a source of references for essays. They are no more "worthwhile" than that. I suppose you can get some behaviour management ideas from them as PGCE courses are notoriously awful at preparing you for this.

    http://teachingbattleground.wordpres...faqs-for-nqts/
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    (Original post by Mr M)
    Books in teacher training are valuable as a source of references for essays. They are no more "worthwhile" than that.
    I am not in teacher training. I'm just looking for books to give me different perspectives on effective teaching and learning, written by those with more experience than me who have done research. In maths, what counts as effective is easy to say: it's how to achieve the best results in a final exam given a certain amount of time and a certain student background. If you give identical classes to two different teachers, with the same amount of time to teach, then why would one class score 90% on an exam after a year and another class score 60%? That's the kind of investigation I'm interested in reading about.

    Do you have any suggestions?
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    (Original post by Kolya)
    I am not in teacher training. I'm just looking for books to give me different perspectives on effective teaching and learning, written by those with more experience than me who have done research. In maths, what counts as effective is easy to say: it's how to achieve the best results in a final exam given a certain amount of time and a certain student background. If you give identical classes to two different teachers, with the same amount of time to teach, then why would one class score 90% on an exam after a year and another class score 60%? That's the kind of investigation I'm interested in reading about.

    Do you have any suggestions?
    I don't know of any meaningful research that has been done in this area. The premise you propose is difficult to achieve - there is no such thing as identical classes, poor behaviour and attitude from one or two individuals can be corrosive and affect the outcomes of all. Some students will have support from family members or private tutors or be entitled to one-to-one tuition or small group intervention and so on.
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    (Original post by Mr M)
    I don't know of any meaningful research that has been done in this area. The premise you propose is difficult to achieve - there is no such thing as identical classes, poor behaviour and attitude from one or two individuals can be corrosive and affect the outcomes of all. Some students will have support from family members or private tutors or be entitled to one-to-one tuition or small group intervention and so on.
    One could therefore randomly assign students to classes, and make the sample size sufficiently large to account for variation in individual circumstances.
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    (Original post by Kolya)
    One could therefore randomly assign students to classes, and make the sample size sufficiently large to account for variation in individual circumstances.
    Not convinced parents would be keen on their children being used as guinea pigs in your experiment!
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    (Original post by Kolya)
    Anybody have any recommendations of worthwhile books about the process of learning, the education system, the job of teaching, etc? Which books helped you teach better?
    The absolute classic one for me is How Children Fail, by John Holt. It's not really a piece of research, but it's thought-provoking.

    Contrary to what's been said above, there's quite a bit of research in this area, and while it tends to use techniques from fields like sociology (e.g. qualitative designs), there is also a large body of quantitative research, much of it summarised in this excellent book by John Hattie: Visible Learning.
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    (Original post by Mr Dactyl)
    The absolute classic one for me is How Children Fail, by John Holt. It's not really a piece of research, but it's thought-provoking.

    Contrary to what's been said above, there's quite a bit of research in this area, and while it tends to use techniques from fields like sociology (e.g. qualitative designs), there is also a large body of quantitative research, much of it summarised in this excellent book by John Hattie: Visible Learning.
    Ah Hattie, the man who says class size doesn't matter because there are successful big classes in many overseas terrorities. Enough said.
 
 
 
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