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    I don't want to physc myself out - but I can't help but ask
    Just how difficult is it to get into the likes of LAMDA or Guildhall - specifically on a 3 Year Acting course?

    Any answers would help greatly..

    thank you
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    Experience of past drama schools can help and past experiences of auditions help as well


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    Well.. over 4000 applicant for each school and about 20 places should but it into perspective. Its extremely hard and each school has 2 or 3 maybe even 4 rounds of auditions. You have to be really good and really prepared.
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    Totally agree with Ruby May - its HIGHLY competitive and the rejection rate is very, very high.

    and if you dont like rejection, then this isnt the job for you.
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    I went to Drama school. It's extremely competitive, and post graduation, it's a hard life. Remember that the auditions will cost money on top of UCAS application, and many drama schools aren't listed on UCAS anyway. They range from £20 to £100+. Also a straight acting course is harder to get on than more varied course. You've picked two top schools, but I suggest checking out: The National Drama Training Council, they have a list of drama schools and all sorts of courses. Whatever you do, and I mean this with sincerity, if you want to act: do not do a "Drama and Theatre Studies" type course at a random university. Go to drama school. My chosen course came up a lot in conversation and it's heartbreaking hearing people talk about their friends and relatives studying drama because they want to act, it's highly unlikely that'll happen. Drama schools provide you with training not just theory. And they support you in finding agents etc. Everywhere you go you'll be asked "where did you train?" In the 6 years I've been in this industry professionally (including study) I have only met one successful untrained actor (and I know people measure this differently but I'm using "success" to mean "regular work").
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    (Original post by bethanycrook)
    I don't want to physc myself out - but I can't help but ask
    Just how difficult is it to get into the likes of LAMDA or Guildhall - specifically on a 3 Year Acting course?

    Any answers would help greatly..

    thank you
    Difficult - less than 1 out of 100 get offers. But if you choose pieces well and are passionate and committed you are already at at advantage. A lot of very underprepared people apply, and a lot of people take several years to get a place. If you want to be an actor then its the best preparation for the industry provided you do a good course.

    Applying is relatively cheap compared to the fees for the course, and it increases your chances of getting a place (and thus not having to pay again next year), so it makes sense to apply to as many as you can reasonably manage and would be happy accepting a place at. Good luck!
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    (Original post by T-o dore)
    If you want to be an actor then its the best preparation for the industry provided you do a good course.
    Not really.

    It's best preparation for the craft -- not the industry.
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    (Original post by Powka)
    Not really.

    It's best preparation for the craft -- not the industry.
    I said 'if you want to be an actor then its the best preparation for the industry'. So the craft was exactly what I was talking about. I'd be interested to hear what advantages you think university drama students have over students at (accredited) drama schools.
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    (Original post by T-o dore)
    I said 'if you want to be an actor then its the best preparation for the industry'. So the craft was exactly what I was talking about. I'd be interested to hear what advantages you think university drama students have over students at (accredited) drama schools.
    I understand what you tried to say, you just made a mistake at formulating it, since the performing arts industry doesn't work in the similar fashion as most of others do.

    Industry revolves around the craft as much as it does around the business side. What you said implied that someone who graduates from a drama school is ready for the acting industry, and they're not. Drama schools do not cover the business side of the acting industry, which in turns produces hundreds of jobless actors lost in what to do next and finding themselves switching the occupation.

    What would've been correct to say is that drama schools provide the best training for an actor (in UK only), and that's about it.

    As for the second part of your statement, I'm not sure what your assumption of me promoting the advantages of acting Universities is based on. I don't recall mentioning them at all.
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    (Original post by Powka)
    Drama schools do not cover the business side of the acting industry, which in turns produces hundreds of jobless actors lost in what to do next and finding themselves switching the occupation.
    Sorry, not sure about your experience with drama schools, but this is wrong. In all the drama schools I auditioned at the courses included quite a lot of tuition in the 'business' side of being an actor. Granted, drama schools are unashamedly all about learning how to act, but many have a lot of resources and teaching about how to promote oneself in the industry etcetera.

    (Original post by Powka)
    As for the second part of your statement, I'm not sure what your assumption of me promoting the advantages of acting Universities is based on. I don't recall mentioning them at all.
    Well, you disagreed that drama schools are the best preparation for being a professional actor, so by implication you think something else is?
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    Why are you so stroppy sounding?! Drama schools do prepare their students for the industry, both in terms of 'craft' and in terms of practical help with agents, self promotion, tax, money, all sorts of things. Of course it's possible to become a professional actor without going to drama school, but graduating from one does give you a good overall foundation, and, if it's one of the top schools, a springboard into the business.
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    (Original post by Jumpin Jacky)
    Why are you so stroppy sounding?! Drama schools do prepare their students for the industry, both in terms of 'craft' and in terms of practical help with agents, self promotion, tax, money, all sorts of things. Of course it's possible to become a professional actor without going to drama school, but graduating from one does give you a good overall foundation, and, if it's one of the top schools, a springboard into the business.
    This thread dates back to 2013...

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