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Why do some people think they need a degree to feel established? Watch

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    Ok, i've noticed some students study either because they have nothing to do in its place or they want to feel established by doing so. Do they realise intelligence cant be bought?
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    I'm that kinda student except my reason is that I don't want my brain to go well mush , I sometimes study after school and during holidays only because I don't want to forget , which may b a reason other students study like that too I don't think it's because they hav nothing else to do
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    That is the sort of world we live in today. I don't know how old you are or what level of study you have achieved but a degree cannot just simply be 'bought'. A degree is an investment in your learning and your commitment to it. If one has a degree it does not show that you have money or that you have debt it shows that you are able to commit yourself to a high level of learning and that you are able to independently challenge yourself.

    A degree shows someone that they are committed to working. In todays world, those who do not have a degree can sometimes be cut short in the interview process as their qualifications are not to standard. In an ideal world, both qualifications and experience would be looked at but there are some employers who will not take people on because they do not have a degree.

    If someone is going to get a degree because they think they can just throw money at it then they will get a very hard reality check hit them when they are struggling to complete it.
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    As above poster said, degrees are all about commitment, they are for someone of my intelligence at least, impossible to 'blag'. That independent learning bit is key, you've shown self motivation and in many cases a passion for an area of study. The drive demonstrated in you surpasses any indication of establishment. You can't buy intelligence, that is a no brainer but for some employers this intelligence needs to be demonstrated by achievement of a degree, the privilege of studying for one must unfortunately be paid for.
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    well, theres three reasons why i do a degree

    1) to have something to be proud of (i was always deemed the one who could because i quite stubborn and unconventional) only one member of my family went to uni (although most my family have or had good jobs including Councillor, electrician to the prince of Saudi Arabia, scientist and business owners in construction and engineering) also i started life in a good area and moved away to a rough area at 12, whilist search facebook a while ago i realised i was the only one from my child hood that didnt go to uni which gave me an extra kick up the ass as i kept putting off applying

    2) i genuinly want a job in the field, i know almost all my future options and all the sub field and similar field and im happy with them all but i also know exactly what i want to do (something younger people dont really think about in the rush to go to uni)

    3) to hopefully set up a better future for me and my son or at least some secuity that if things go wrong we wont lose everything, believe it or not but a degree can hold that security, if your in an accident and left unable to work (like my mam who was paralyzed though no fault of her own) the compensation you receive is based on the possible loss of future earning, degree jobs pay better than say stocking selves at asda with 3 GCSEs so you would get a higher amount even if you have never had a graduate job - my mams college education and ongoing training in a graduate level job meant she got more than enough to secure or future without having to rely on benefits and scraping the bread line
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    (Original post by rattusratus)
    well, theres three reasons why i do a degree

    1) to have something to be proud of (i was always deemed the one who could because i quite stubborn and unconventional) only one member of my family went to uni (although most my family have or had good jobs including Councillor, electrician to the prince of Saudi Arabia, scientist and business owners in construction and engineering) also i started life in a good area and moved away to a rough area at 12, whilist search facebook a while ago i realised i was the only one from my child hood that didnt go to uni which gave me an extra kick up the ass as i kept putting off applying

    2) i genuinly want a job in the field, i know almost all my future options and all the sub field and similar field and im happy with them all but i also know exactly what i want to do (something younger people dont really think about in the rush to go to uni)

    3) to hopefully set up a better future for me and my son or at least some secuity that if things go wrong we wont lose everything, believe it or not but a degree can hold that security, if your in an accident and left unable to work (like my mam who was paralyzed though no fault of her own) the compensation you receive is based on the possible loss of future earning, degree jobs pay better than say stocking selves at asda with 3 GCSEs so you would get a higher amount even if you have never had a graduate job - my mams college education and ongoing training in a graduate level job meant she got more than enough to secure or future without having to rely on benefits and scraping the bread line
    I can tell you that you are so wrong. I have found getting my degrees to be the most useless peices of paper I have wasted my time on.

    Degrees are hugely devalued in todays job market, and I would strongly discourage anyone from going to university unless they were studying medicine or to become a socilitor or engineer etc.

    I butterly regret going to unversity and I can tell you that unless your job actually requires a degree you will in no way command a higher salary than a non-graduate.

    as for ex polytchnics, these joke establishments are nothing more than cash cows for foreing students, they should be torn down as I would go as far as to call these "universities" thieves
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    your very wrong and its strange the ex polys seem to have higher levels of employment then you classic red bricks because there more vocation based so not useless at all

    second at what point did i mention salary :confused: thats not at any point mentioned in my reasons so how did your rant prove im wrong
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    You are being ignorant. Sometimes a degree is absolutely essential: medicine for doctors; chemical engineering for chemical engineers; dentistry for dentists; computer science for technological advancements. Not everyone wants a generic office job that has zero practical relevance to degree studied.

    Intelligence? PAH!! you really think they study to appear as an intellectual?

    What they should do is cut the number of useless subjects so that we can be more efficient.
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    Everyone has different aspirations. And need different securities. For some that is knowledge, for others money, for some family and so forth.
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    (Original post by blank_smile)
    Ok, i've noticed some students study either because they have nothing to do in its place or they want to feel established by doing so. Do they realise intelligence cant be bought?
    I didn't go to uni to get intelligence but to get a better job in the future, I am personally scared ****less about not having stability when I leave uni, so am taking all opportunities that uni offers me fully on board, such as trying out teaching and starting a society and going to extra things all to make my cv at the end of it look better than another person wanting the same job.
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    Degrees own


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    Further study is not for everyone, let's just get that out of the way. If you are genuinely interested in the field that you are studying, and either; would like a job related to that field, or; would like a job that requires a degree in general. Then I suggest University study is required.

    Do not feel rushed, though. If you do not know what you want to do, then I would strongly suggest doing an Apprenticeship, mainly due to the fact that it is placing you within the real working world, and you're not only gaining more skills, but you're gaining a vast amount of experience, and training, which is vital within today's society. After that Apprenticeship, you can then decide if you would like University, as you can go to study just like any normal student, but the key difference is, you have experience and have been trained officially by an Employer.

    I myself have just completed an Apprenticeship (Business and Administrations at a local College) after completing my A-levels. I'm now going to Durham University in October 2013 (I'm only 19, not a mature fully matured student yet). I'll not only have my degree, but I'll also have 1 year worth of working experience under my belt, and an NVQ for the job market, and that will help greatly while looking for part-time employment, too. Essentially, I discovered that I would love to teach. Long story short, my boss who I was a personal assistant for was previously a teacher, and I got some experience working within the educational environment.

    University is great; it shows that you can commit to something, and you can dedicate yourself to learning independently, and mentally challenging yourself, which are great skills for employers. A lot of people say that a degree will not open doors for you, which is in essence correct; you must develop yourself as a person and individual while being at University. This is not only studying and doing well academically, but you must also show your passion by doing work experience. There's a reason why your contact time is barely 15 hours per week; mainly due to the fact that you must in affect gain experience, set yourself up with an employer, and do either paid and/or voluntary work in the field of your interest. This is not the say it has to be specifically related, but it always helps. I could for example, get experience working within a School, providing I have my CBR check cleared and they allow it.

    If I developed myself fully, as an individual at University, and lets say for example, I had a three year course; I did well, got a 2.1, I took part in societies, and most importantly, I did my own independent work and set myself up with an employer and got 3 years worth of working experience in different schools. My individual profile would be fantastic.

    Experience is the main reason why graduates fail to gain employment (and sometimes grades, providing the employer has a filter).
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    A degree puts you on a plateau above those that do not have a degree. It opens many doors that you didn't have before. For instance, it's unlikely that Apple will hire a software engineer who has a basic set of GCSEs. They are much more likely to employ a Computer Science graduate from Cambridge. Why? because they've got a piece of paper that says they're better.

    It's correct to say you can do better than a graduate without having a degree. Many business hotshots say that they dropped out of uni because their course wasn't teaching them what they wanted to know at the pace they wanted to learn it. For example, Alan Sugar left school at 16 and didn't pursue Further/Higher education, and now has an approx. worth of £770m.

    I guess if you wanted to employ someone to run a branch of your computer company, you'd sooner employ Alan Sugar than a Cambridge computer science graduate. Why? because Alan Sugar has a piece of paper that says he's better than the cambridge graduate.

    A degree may be considered the 'easy way' to prove how good you are at something. That's all very well, but it's got nothing on experience. Experience is empirical evidence that you are good (as long as your previous company thrived, nobody is going to employ someone that scuppered up where they last worked)
 
 
 
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