Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Maths AQA C1 revision - 14th January 2013 Watch

Announcements
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Taran Hare)
    Yeah I put [3 2] but not sure what about the factor theoren question??Its easy but for some reason i completely blanked out. Man I hate Maths! Aiming for a B.
    i got the one of them was a factor (x+1) i think

    then for the remainder question, i THINK i got the remainder was 12....or it might have been 16... can't remember :/
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Taran Hare)
    Yeah I put [3 2] but not sure what about the factor theoren question??Its easy but for some reason i completely blanked out. Man I hate Maths! Aiming for a B.
    I didn't know what the third factor was when it asked you to express p(x) as a product of 3 factors. Does anybody know what the third factor was and how did you work it out? Thanks in advance if you answer my question.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ferrari_1996)
    Did anybody else get 5 as the radius for the circle?
    yeah i got that r=5
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ferrari_1996)
    Did anybody else get 5 as the radius for the circle?
    yes
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Would anyone hazard a guess as to what the A grade boundary would be?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ferrari_1996)
    I didn't know what the third factor was when it asked you to express p(x) as a product of 3 factors. Does anybody know what the third factor was and how did you work it out? Many thanks in advance.
    i got that there was a repeated root of (x-3) so when you were asked to draw the graph the curve touched the x-axis at 3
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ferrari_1996)
    I didn't know what the third factor was when it asked you to express p(x) as a product of 3 factors. Does anybody know what the third factor was and how did you work it out? Many thanks in advance.
    The product of p(x) as linear factors was:

    (x+1)(x-3)^2 if I remember correctly.

    To work them out I just used the factor theorem, ie. if x-3 was a factor, p(3) would = 0.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nursy96)
    yeah i got that r=5
    Good. It was root25 wasn't it?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ferrari_1996)
    I didn't know what the third factor was when it asked you to express p(x) as a product of 3 factors. Does anybody know what the third factor was and how did you work it out? Thanks in advance if you answer my question.
    (x-3)(x-3)(x+2)
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nursy96)
    i got that there was a repeated root of (x-3) so when you were asked to draw the graph the curve touched the x-axis at 3
    How do you know that there was a repeated root of (x-3)?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ferrari_1996)
    Good. It was root25 wasn't it?
    yep
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ferrari_1996)
    Good. It was root25 wasn't it?
    Same thing
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by zakir123)
    (x-3)(x-3)(x+2)
    Ok thanks but how do you know if there are two factors that are the same? Is it because, if the three numbers are multiplied together, they must equal 18?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SherlockHolmes)
    I remember my answer was 2/7. The fraction given in the question had root18 and root32 somewhere in the question.

    2root2 divided by root18+root32 I think.
    crap i forgot to simpify it further to get 2/7. I.always do something like thus in maths!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ferrari_1996)
    How do you know that there was a repeated root of (x-3)?
    because you knew (x-3) was a factor from a previous question, when you did long division you got (x2-x-6) and the two factors from that were (x+2)(x-3) so there was a repeated root of (x-3)
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fillly)
    Would anyone hazard a guess as to what the A grade boundary would be?
    maybe 60 as normal 80% cuz fairly a decent paper 52 for a B 44 for a C
    these are however by perecentages cud change depending on everyone else but majority found it quite easy so ill asume aqa will stick to their guns and do the grade boundaries as they should be
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nursy96)
    because you knew (x-3) was a factor from a previous question, when you did long division you got (x2-x-6) and the two factors from that were (x+2)(x-3) so there was a repeated root of (x-3)
    I used the factor theorem instead of long division. Weren't you supposed to use the factor theorem instead of long division?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    How many marks do people think you could drop to get an A?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ferrari_1996)
    Ok thanks but how do you know if there are two factors that are the same? Is it because, if the three numbers are multiplied together, they must equal 18?
    yes you can mutliply it out which i did in the exam and came out to the correct equation also wen drawring the graph the curve on intrests the x axis 1 and touches it at 3 then shoots off
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ferrari_1996)
    I used the factor theorem instead of long division. Weren't you supposed to use the factor theorem instead of long division?
    i think you can do both but long division along with the previous factor shows the three linear factors required in the question, its just quicker than using the factor theorem most of the time
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Will you be richer or poorer than your parents?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.