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    (Original post by York2595)
    That's annoying then, you have to go in the opposite direction to Durham at first, then go back on yourself!Yeah I don't mind long train journeys, as long as you have something to do they're fine . Aha sounds like you're good at meeting knew people! Indeed, and also if we've seen what the accomodation/college is like, plus met some other applicants, it won't be such a shock starting uni for real. Well I think there are uni students at the station, maybe you could ask one of them to help you carry all the stuff? I think Hild/Bede is closer to the station than other colleges so it shouldn't be too bad .

    I like learning languages in general, so I don't see why I would hate Russian, hopefully I'll enjoy it (if I decide to do it) . Yeah, would have been stupid to miss out on learning a bit of Russian if it was at your school!
    I probably could do some route just going up, but it would probably be a bit more complicated, with changes and such; I'm used to navigating into London, so that part is pretty easy--though it'll probably be more complicated with luggage!--and then I can just sit back and relax on the train. I'm all right; my strategy is just to talk at people and the situation does tend to ease. (A lot of weird **** happens to me, which means I've got a few good stories.) I know, eek, I'm a bit nervous about the transition from school to uni, so getting a taste of it would be really good. Ohh, that would be really helpful, I hope there are people at the station. I don't really know much about this day, I should really look up more about it.

    Good luck with choosing~ Are you going to look at each language on the post-offer day? The lessons at school were really fun, they were pretty laid back. I imagine it'll be a bit more hectic at uni, but hopefully just as fun
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    (Original post by Caits7)
    Wow, that's amazing! So did you just apply for French? And at the end is your degree called French or Modern Languages if you've applied for pure French?
    I only did French at A level, but I actually applied for French and Spanish (more or less on a whim...). But there're fairly flexible, so I'm fairly sure that, even if you only put one language down on UCAS, you could choose two when you get your module choice form in the post.

    If I remember correctly my degree certificate says Modern Languages, but on my CV I tend to write "BA Modern Languages - French and Spanish" since those are the languages that I took all the way at fourth year level, if that makes any sense to you?

    But it's not really important. The important thing is that you get to go to Durham and have four years doing amazing fun things. I'm reasonably jealous.
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    (Original post by Taemon)
    I only did French at A level, but I actually applied for French and Spanish (more or less on a whim...). But there're fairly flexible, so I'm fairly sure that, even if you only put one language down on UCAS, you could choose two when you get your module choice form in the post.

    If I remember correctly my degree certificate says Modern Languages, but on my CV I tend to write "BA Modern Languages - French and Spanish" since those are the languages that I took all the way at fourth year level, if that makes any sense to you?

    But it's not really important. The important thing is that you get to go to Durham and have four years doing amazing fun things. I'm reasonably jealous.
    Sounds pretty flexible then, thanks! I think the only thing really stopping me from choosing Durham is the distance, it's a good 5 hours away :/
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    (Original post by York2595)
    Ah it sounds like a really good course! I think I'll speak to the department when I'm at the open day and see if I can change, but it sounds like we pretty much do what we want, and that we can change what we do a bit during the 4 years
    Yeah exactly it's so flexible, I like how we don't actually have to commit to anything, and by the looks of things you get to choose which countries you spend your year abroad in, I really want to learn Russian but the thought of living in Russia when I haven't been learning it that long terrifies me :')
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    (Original post by Caits7)
    I really want to learn Russian but the thought of living in Russia when I haven't been learning it that long terrifies me :')
    Why is it so?
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    (Original post by Paul PTS)
    Why is it so?
    I suppose it's the thought of going to a country where the crime rate is so high and it's so far away when my level of spoken skill might not be too great...
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    (Original post by Caits7)
    I suppose it's the thought of going to a country where the crime rate is so high and it's so far away when my level of spoken skill might not be too great...
    You could visit me at summer. And after that to make conclusions about the country.
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    (Original post by Caits7)
    Yeah exactly it's so flexible, I like how we don't actually have to commit to anything, and by the looks of things you get to choose which countries you spend your year abroad in, I really want to learn Russian but the thought of living in Russia when I haven't been learning it that long terrifies me :')
    Yup, I know people that went pretty much everywhere. Hispanophones get the best deal, because they have the choice of most of Latin America, but Francophones can always take advantage of France's foreign territories (plus, I think I remember that someone spent several months in Madagascar...).

    I went to Russia after one year of Russian. It was pretty nerve-racking to begin with, but it soon became absolutely amazing. I know consider the four months I spent in St Petersburg to be four of the best months in my life. I want to go back.

    (Original post by Caits7)
    I suppose it's the thought of going to a country where the crime rate is so high and it's so far away when my level of spoken skill might not be too great...
    Rule One of Year Abroad: Don't stereotype.
    Rule Two of Year Abroad: Don't generalise

    Russia is an amazing country full of lovely amazing people who are all (once you get to know them) incredibly friendly and perfectly willing to welcome near-strangers into their homes. Don't believe everything you hear about Russia. It is often unfairly maligned.

    (Original post by Paul PTS)
    Why is it so?
    Всё ещё думаешь, что я нигериец?

    EDIT: At the request of a moderator, I shall provide a translation: Do you still think I'm Nigerian?
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    (Original post by Taemon)

    Всё ещё думаешь, что я нигериец?
    Right you are. When you talk with Russian girls at TSR, there appear and grammar mistakes and so on. But when you write me - the grammar mistakes suddenly disappear.
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    (Original post by Paul PTS)
    Right you are. When you talk with Russian girls at TSR, there appear and grammar mistakes and so on. But when you write me - the grammar mistakes suddenly disappear.
    I take this entirely as a compliment. I still can't believe I'm able to form a sentence in Russian without any grammar mistakes!
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    (Original post by Taemon)
    Yup, I know people that went pretty much everywhere. Hispanophones get the best deal, because they have the choice of most of Latin America, but Francophones can always take advantage of France's foreign territories (plus, I think I remember that someone spent several months in Madagascar...).

    I went to Russia after one year of Russian. It was pretty nerve-racking to begin with, but it soon became absolutely amazing. I know consider the four months I spent in St Petersburg to be four of the best months in my life. I want to go back.



    Rule One of Year Abroad: Don't stereotype.
    Rule Two of Year Abroad: Don't generalise

    Russia is an amazing country full of lovely amazing people who are all (once you get to know them) incredibly friendly and perfectly willing to welcome near-strangers into their homes. Don't believe everything you hear about Russia. It is often unfairly maligned.
    That's actually really reassuring, do you more or less pick up Russian while you're there or are you already at a good standard by the time you go?
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    (Original post by Taemon)
    I take this entirely as a compliment. I still can't believe I'm able to form a sentence in Russian without any grammar mistakes!
    I'm on the left photo.
    http://pressa-online.com/IssueF.aspx?iid=69545#2.
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    (Original post by Caits7)
    That's actually really reassuring, do you more or less pick up Russian while you're there or are you already at a good standard by the time you go?
    If you take Russian from scratch in first year, you can reach a fairly reasonable level - if you do a fair amount of work - by the time you go on the year abroad. You should be able to communicate without too much trouble. If you did as I did, and pick up Russian from scratch in your second year, your Russian really won't be all that super by the time you hit the year abroad - unless you're amazing at these things. So when I arrived in Russia, I must admit that I didn't really understand very much of what my host was saying.

    But then that's what the year abroad is all about - immersion learning. You're supposed to get a ridiculous amount better during the months that you're in the country, and most people really do. By the time I left, I was having proper conversations with my host, which for only a year and a half of Russian isn't bad going, really...
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    (Original post by Taemon)
    If you take Russian from scratch in first year, you can reach a fairly reasonable level - if you do a fair amount of work - by the time you go on the year abroad. You should be able to communicate without too much trouble. If you did as I did, and pick up Russian from scratch in your second year, your Russian really won't be all that super by the time you hit the year abroad - unless you're amazing at these things. So when I arrived in Russia, I must admit that I didn't really understand very much of what my host was saying.

    But then that's what the year abroad is all about - immersion learning. You're supposed to get a ridiculous amount better during the months that you're in the country, and most people really do. By the time I left, I was having proper conversations with my host, which for only a year and a half of Russian isn't bad going, really...
    Yeah, I suppose you would... I think I'll probably take it from the first year then, thanks!
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    (Original post by Caits7)
    Yeah exactly it's so flexible, I like how we don't actually have to commit to anything, and by the looks of things you get to choose which countries you spend your year abroad in, I really want to learn Russian but the thought of living in Russia when I haven't been learning it that long terrifies me :')
    Me too, I was a bit worried about committing to something, then hating it, but that doesn't seem to be a problem at Durham . Haha I was worried by that too, I'm not sure how I'd cope going to Russia after just 2 years of learning Russian- although I guess you'll improve your Russian loads over the year abroad so it doesn't really matter too much if you're not so good at the beginning .
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    (Original post by Sopih)
    I probably could do some route just going up, but it would probably be a bit more complicated, with changes and such; I'm used to navigating into London, so that part is pretty easy--though it'll probably be more complicated with luggage!--and then I can just sit back and relax on the train. I'm all right; my strategy is just to talk at people and the situation does tend to ease. (A lot of weird **** happens to me, which means I've got a few good stories.) I know, eek, I'm a bit nervous about the transition from school to uni, so getting a taste of it would be really good. Ohh, that would be really helpful, I hope there are people at the station. I don't really know much about this day, I should really look up more about it.

    Good luck with choosing~ Are you going to look at each language on the post-offer day? The lessons at school were really fun, they were pretty laid back. I imagine it'll be a bit more hectic at uni, but hopefully just as fun
    Yeah I guess there'll be a way but London is probably easiest, you can get trains to pretty much anywhere from London. I keep forgetting we'll have to bring luggage in it, it will make the tube a bit of a nightmare :L. I'm going to try very hard to be social haha, but everyone will be a bit nervous so it shouldn't be too bad . Well I'm sure those good stories will make for useful icebreakers in conversation! Yep, I'm not sure how much of a jump there is between school and university, so it would be useful to find that out... I think it said on some PDF thing about the open day that there'd be students at the station, but I can't remember where I saw it for certain.

    Thanks! I think I'll go to the German and Russian talks, and maybe speak to the lecturers from other departments (if there's a chance to do that). It will be different, because at uni there'll be a bit of pressure because the Russian you learn will count for something, but I'm sure it'll still be fun
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    I've applied for French and ab initio Spanish and Butler and still haven't heard anything! Anyone still waiting for a reply? It's my first choice so fingers crossed!
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    (Original post by misslucyharries)
    I've applied for French and ab initio Spanish and Butler and still haven't heard anything! Anyone still waiting for a reply? It's my first choice so fingers crossed!
    Same :/

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    Still waiting - applied for Chinese. Sigh...
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    (Original post by jess_pear95)
    I'm just in search of Modern Language Applicants like myself, and I'd like to know...
    Which languages?
    Offer received?
    Preferred college?

    And yeah that's pretty much it
    I've applied for French and Spanish, I received a conditional offer late November, and I've applied to Collingwood, because I went to visit it on the open day and thought the atmosphere was wonderful



    Posted from TSR Mobile

    Hey,
    Have an offer from Grey College to do French and Spanish. Got the offer in 27th February :/ took agggeessssss!
 
 
 
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