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    If I do an Aerospace engineering degree, what kind of jobs can I get after it?

    I don't want to do manual labour. I'd like to do something that doesn't involve that.

    Anyone got any ideas?
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    As a graduate, you'll probably be working in the design/testing departments. Stuff like that. Engineers may well work hands-on with the components and vehicles, but you could end up with a desk job working on designs if that's what you apply for.

    I doubt you'd be making as an assembler though - Those roles typically require expert training specifically for them. Quite often for apprentices and the such.


    Provided you have "engineering" in your title, you can work across a really broad range of industries. Aerospace does not limit you to working with aviation. You could be working on cars, trains, ships, sports equipment, racing teams, industrial design, product design, etc. The real course difference between Aerospace and something like Mechanical is that the course content might be slightly more tailored towards aviation and you'll have aviation-specific classes in the latter years. Mechanical engineering is a tad broader, but they're all basically the same!


    The better question is: What do you want to do?
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    (Original post by SillyEddy)
    As a graduate, you'll probably be working in the design/testing departments. Stuff like that. Engineers may well work hands-on with the components and vehicles, but you could end up with a desk job working on designs if that's what you apply for.

    I doubt you'd be making as an assembler though - Those roles typically require expert training specifically for them. Quite often for apprentices and the such.


    Provided you have "engineering" in your title, you can work across a really broad range of industries. Aerospace does not limit you to working with aviation. You could be working on cars, trains, ships, sports equipment, racing teams, industrial design, product design, etc. The real course difference between Aerospace and something like Mechanical is that the course content might be slightly more tailored towards aviation and you'll have aviation-specific classes in the latter years. Mechanical engineering is a tad broader, but they're all basically the same!


    The better question is: What do you want to do?
    Thanks for the reply. The degree doesn't actually have engineering in the title- it's 'Aerospace Technologies with Pilot Studies' -- Does this still count as an engineering degree? It's a BSc but it's the only one I can get on to.
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    It'll be reasonable - You should be able to get into grad schems, train to be a science teacher etc depending on how good you are at selling yourself.

    you can look it up on unistats to see what previous graduates have ended up doing
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    (Original post by Runninground)
    Thanks for the reply. The degree doesn't actually have engineering in the title- it's 'Aerospace Technologies with Pilot Studies' -- Does this still count as an engineering degree? It's a BSc but it's the only one I can get on to.
    it will be different from an engineering degree but in some aspects it will be similar. Usually the engineering degrees BEng and MEng are specifically tailored to create "engineers" however the MEng is more the overall package equipping you with professional business skills as well as industry standard skills. Of course u do get business modules in the BEng but they are not as specific as they are in the Meng year.
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    (Original post by Runninground)
    Thanks for the reply. The degree doesn't actually have engineering in the title- it's 'Aerospace Technologies with Pilot Studies' -- Does this still count as an engineering degree? It's a BSc but it's the only one I can get on to.
    Hmm. That does mix things up a bit then.

    From the offset, it does seem like Aerospace Tech will be mostly hands-on sort of work. You might have the chance to design new systems (the avionics) though... That might be more desk job based instead of working in the field.


    I would either wait for someone to reply if they've done it themselves, or email the university for further information about career prospects, explaining what you're looking for in the future.
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    Thanks.

    I need an A-level in maths and physics to get on the BEng or MEng ones. Do you think the Uni would be flexible on this? I did a engineering diploma in Year 10 and 11, but I didn't do A-Levels in 12 & 13, I did a BTEC in Business.
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    The maths is pretty much essential for all the courses out there nowadays. You might be able to do a foundation degree though, which will teach you the basics. However, it isn't exactly cheap.

    I didn't do full A-level maths, I just did AS with a mechanics module, and was accepted. Don't expect it to get you into the top top universities though! There are still a few universities accepting AS maths for BEng courses.


    Is it possible to do an extra year of college somewhere, or enter yourself as a private candidate and just sit the exams? Last year I just self-taught physics and maths (I had an E in physics from giving up and not bothering) and managed to get ABCc overall for my A2s/AS. It would be worth checking that the university will accept you for doing it this route, but it is a viable method. You'd be better off having a good long chat with the admissions team really.
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    (Original post by SillyEddy)
    The maths is pretty much essential for all the courses out there nowadays. You might be able to do a foundation degree though, which will teach you the basics. However, it isn't exactly cheap.

    I didn't do full A-level maths, I just did AS with a mechanics module, and was accepted. Don't expect it to get you into the top top universities though! There are still a few universities accepting AS maths for BEng courses.


    Is it possible to do an extra year of college somewhere, or enter yourself as a private candidate and just sit the exams? Last year I just self-taught physics and maths (I had an E in physics from giving up and not bothering) and managed to get ABCc overall for my A2s/AS. It would be worth checking that the university will accept you for doing it this route, but it is a viable method. You'd be better off having a good long chat with the admissions team really.
    I've sent them an email just now explaining that I have an Engineering Diploma and I asked how flexible they could be.

    I may see if my college can put me on a fast track A-level course or something.

    (I didn't actually want to go to Uni but i've not really found anything else I would like to do so I'm only really applying as a fall back thing, but I'd need to do more work :/ :P)
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    (Original post by Runninground)
    Thanks.

    I need an A-level in maths and physics to get on the BEng or MEng ones. Do you think the Uni would be flexible on this? I did a engineering diploma in Year 10 and 11, but I didn't do A-Levels in 12 & 13, I did a BTEC in Business.
    Wait, how can you expect to do aerospace engineering without maths or physics?

    You could try an engineering course with a foundation year. Otherwise, you'll struggle to find a course that's 'engineering', ask the university about the job prospects of that course, what's on the course, what sorts of skills will be taught?

    edit: oh I see, an engineering diploma. Ok, same advice I think
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    Just wondering is it hard to get jobs in this industry now?
 
 
 
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