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    Does anyone have this?

    My Dr came to this possible diagnosis yesterday after years of not really knowing why random things were happening. But I don't know if its the right diagnosis. I've googled it and all the sights have this massive list of 'symptoms' which are all quite major.

    I mean, when you think of someone with MS you think of someone in a wheelchair who can't walk. We've all watched Neighbours (or maybe we haven't but thats not the point) and I am not like that. I'm just unsteady on my feet sometimes and have a bad hip. But that could be anything right, I mean I constantly hurt myself playing hockey for county. Including dislocated hip and knee and smashed wrist. And I constantly have imbalanced electrolytes which are bound to make me wobble.

    And okay, I tire easily, but I'm not the fittest and I am a student. Students get tired right? Plus, I don't eat a healthy diet or anything so I'm probably deficient in all sorts of vitamins and what not.

    Sometimes I get strange vision, but I don't eat properly so associate that with low blood sugar. Plus I have a little cataract so thats bound to get worse anyway.

    And when I get excited/emotional my words don't come out ... but I am constantly trying to depress my accent because its common and not looked upon well. Rah Uni + Somerset farmer accent = bad. Now you try speaking a different accent and not stumble on words!

    I can come up with reasons to explain everything, yet she has come up with this? She is sending me off for more tests, but its a waste of time. But then she's been spot on with most things since I started Uni over 3 years ago ... but they weren't such life altering things. And I know I feel old, especially compared to all these fresh 18 years olds I live with, but I am only 21 (22 in 4 weeks) so surely I'm too young to be going down this route?

    As you can tell, I am panicking ever so slightly. I mean, I've applied for PhD's and have got an interview for one of them. What do I tell them? I lead mountain expeditions in my spare time, I don't want to stop that. Am I safe to take a bunch on kids into the mountain on my own? I like to run away to the mountains when I get stressed (if there was money in my account I would be there already) but can I really be confident I can be safe on my own?

    Does any one have or know anyone with MS? Anyone been told it might be and tests ruled it out?

    Anything??
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    I have all your symptoms, plus a hell of a lot more and no-one has ever discussed MS with me. Sounds like your doctor is just being thorough. Which is a good thing, because it means she'll hopefully get to the bottom of whatever is happening, but MS is quite a large leap to make.

    All you can do is hope for the best. Even if you do have it, it's not the end of the world - many people with MS can live pretty normal lives.

    Good luck whatever happens

    P.S
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    Somerset farmer accent, yo
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    My cousin has MS. If you think of a severely disabled person upon hearing MS, you're misinformed. MS starts off very mild, my cousin was diagnosed after blurry vision and tripping a couple of times. She was diagnosed about a year ago, at age 17. She's gone to uni now, and isn't considered disabled or anything, she just has to give herself an injection every day. It's no more of a big deal than brushing your teeth in the morning. During relapses, it can sometimes be stressful (But of course you aren't normally relapsing), you may feel tired and have blurry vision etc.

    For your PHD applications, you certainly don't need to, and shouldn't, tell them anything until you've been diagnosed. If and when you're diagnosed, then you should tell them. I'm afraid I don't know about the mountains thing - it doesn't sound like it'd be a great idea.

    You should bring up any concerns you have with your physician. They'll probably be used to these sorts of things. There's also no shame in booking an hour with a psychotherapist, just to talk about any worries you're having. You can do this on the NHS, or there are plenty of organisations that will help you. MSsociety is one that specifically helps people with MS - as the name suggests.

    I'm not a physician, so don't take my views over those of a qualified medical professional blah blah blah. Hope you sort your stuff out
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    At the moment, it sounds like they're considering it as a possibility, rather than giving you a definite diagnosis. Is this a GP diagnosis or are you seeing a neurologist?

    MS can present in all sorts of ways, and as the name suggests, "relapsing-remitting" means that you get occasional episodes of symptoms which go away in between. These symptoms can be anything from blurred vision to numbness or weakness in one or more limbs. It certainly doesn't mean being wheelchair bound permanently. There are also some new treatments which are really promising. So try not to panic about things at the moment, and certainly don't start changing your future plans, until you've had more tests and got a firmer diagnosis.
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    (Original post by Atheism)
    ...
    Thats really positive, thank you.

    I know its not something you wake up and spend the rest of your life in a wheelchair, but no where online can anyone give a best guess as to if/when I will get to that point. And its that which scares me more I guess. I like to know what is happening and when, not knowing makes me anxious. I'm already labelled disabled by the Uni so that doesn't bother me either.

    With the PhD, being physical geography, there are periods of time when you have to go away and take field samples for different lengths of times in different countries. They are unlikely to give me funding unless I can do that. And i can't afford it without funding. Its kind of my dream in life.

    Going to be the longest 3 weeks of my life waiting for this neurology appointment. And from what she said/I've read even that might not give a definitive yes or no. I don't know anyone with MS which doesn't help as I really don't understand it in its entirety. I don't 100% trust google.

    I've got the Drs again next week for a double appointment, I will ask to see if I can speak to someone ... although that makes it more real.

    (Original post by Helenia)
    ..
    GP at the moment I think, I've got a neurology appointment in 3 weeks.

    I suffer from a personality disorder, so its not hard to panic me, even when I have been stable for 5 months. I guess I just want a yes or no answer from them but she said it may take months. I won't withdraw the applications I've made, and I probably won't get the offers anyway, but i don't know, I just really like to know what is happening when..
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    You sound like you have a lot going on in your head, have you spoken to anyone about this? Like family or a friend or someone at your University (I'm assuming you are at Uni from the PhD comment)

    Can't offer up much insight into MS as I have no experience at all, but as its not confirmed either way I would try not to worry too much about the future, just focus on the here and now.

    Hope it is good news for you

    A3paper xx
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    (Original post by GooglyEyedMonster)
    Thats really positive, thank you.

    I know its not something you wake up and spend the rest of your life in a wheelchair, but no where online can anyone give a best guess as to if/when I will get to that point. And its that which scares me more I guess. I like to know what is happening and when, not knowing makes me anxious. I'm already labelled disabled by the Uni so that doesn't bother me either.
    I guess they either really don't know, or they don't want to scare you by saying "in x amount of years, this will happen to you". I am also in the situation (although, my condition is completely different) of no-one knowing what's going to happen to me.
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    (Original post by a3paper)
    You sound like you have a lot going on in your head, have you spoken to anyone about this? Like family or a friend or someone at your University (I'm assuming you are at Uni from the PhD comment)

    Can't offer up much insight into MS as I have no experience at all, but as its not confirmed either way I would try not to worry too much about the future, just focus on the here and now.

    Hope it is good news for you

    A3paper xx
    I live with my nan but she is away on a very well deserved holiday with my Uncle. Uni is still pretty quiet. But its fine, I'm used to dealing with things on my own. Doesn't always work but I can try. Guess I need to try and focus on the impending final teaching term and block it out as worrying won't change anything.

    (Original post by OU Student)
    I guess they either really don't know, or they don't want to scare you by saying "in x amount of years, this will happen to you". I am also in the situation (although, my condition is completely different) of no-one knowing what's going to happen to me.
    That's what it looks like. They give cryptic clues like how you are the first 5 years after diagnosis and 1/3 of those after 20 years. Feel like a ticking time bomb. Got a failing kidney and irregular ECG's at the moment from other health problems. Just wish I knew when I will go bang!

    Hope its not too serious for you x
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    (Original post by GooglyEyedMonster)
    I live with my nan but she is away on a very well deserved holiday with my Uncle. Uni is still pretty quiet. But its fine, I'm used to dealing with things on my own. Doesn't always work but I can try. Guess I need to try and focus on the impending final teaching term and block it out as worrying won't change anything.
    I think it would be beneficial to tell someone close to you, to get it off your chest. I mean, we TSRians are pretty cool, but we are no match for an actual human being.

    Whether they give you a yes or no as an answer, the next few weeks will be tough and you sound pretty stressed already.

    PM me if you want to chat, I'm no expert but I can listen xx
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    (Original post by a3paper)
    I think it would be beneficial to tell someone close to you, to get it off your chest. I mean, we TSRians are pretty cool, but we are no match for an actual human being.

    Whether they give you a yes or no as an answer, the next few weeks will be tough and you sound pretty stressed already.

    PM me if you want to chat, I'm no expert but I can listen xx
    Thanks, but I am fine on my own. If it comes back a yes then I would probably tell someone but what can I say to them now 'Hi, I may have MS but I may not.'

    I like what I have now in terms of support for everything else and I don't want to change if it I don't need too.
 
 
 
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