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    I am currently doing my PGCE, as some of you may know from the previous threads I have created here. I find myself giving a fair few break time detentions each week to the same minority of students. The problem is that a lot of them don't seem to show improvement, or some will behave well for the rest of the week and then gradually escalate.

    I must add that I'm not massively strict. I will often give several (roughly 5) warnings before issuing a detention unless there is an extreme circumstance, for example there was a student who threw a pen at me deliberately, he was given a detention straight off the bat.

    My questions are:

    * Do detentions ever seem to work (i.e. any 'success stories' you can share)?
    * Which are better: after-school or break-time detentions?
    * Any suggestions for alternative sanctions (within reason) so I don't need to keep giving detentions?

    Note: I am not going to disclose any information about the school or my course just in case I've given a detention to a TSR user, could be awkward.
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    You should give them less warnings...5 is ridiculous. 2 or 3 warnings should be the limit.
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    I agree 5 is far too many! 3 I'd suggest, 1 verbal warning, if have to be warned a second time name goes on the board, if a 3rd then detention. After school I'd think would be better, more of an inconvenience Possibly even have a rule that 2 detentions in a week equals a phone call home for the more serious and repeat offenders. What kind of behavioural procedure do they have in your school, e.g could you send them to the head of department or isolation/safety net/cooler?
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    Detentions don't really do anything. Especially lunchtime ones. Everyone at my old school used to hugely fear after school detentions - those will be much more effective.

    Issue less warnings. Then they'll start seeing how far they can push you, and use that to their advantage. Every now and then give an immediate detention (or after one warning) so they don't know how far to push you, and they'll be less likely to misbehave.

    Calling home to parents is generally a good threat, but if you make it all the time then they'll know you'll never follow through. What you could do is keep them behind after class, or during their detention, and on their own tell them in a very serious way that you will call their parents if they keep misbehaving. Then they'll realise (or think) that it's not just an empty threat you're giving in the heat of an argument, but you've thought about it, so will be more likely to happen. And also, if they're alone then they're less likely to act outlandishly because they're not trying to impress or show off to anyone.

    Hope this helps
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    I think 3 warnings (verbal, name on board, then detention) then if they are in detention 2/3 times in a week (depending on how often you see the kids) then say you will ring home. Do you have a report card system? Use that if you have it available.

    I'm NQT and I'm struggling like mad, but I get all new classes in January (with about 5-10 kids that I know kept in each set). I'm just sick of battling against them. The worst is when you've given them a detention and then they keep misbehaving in class. There are only so many rooms I can remove pupils to!
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    After school detentions are probably a better deterrent as they present a greater inconvenience and are more likely to attract the notice of parents. Five warnings sounds like a lot and if you vary the number of warnings then these are likely to be less effective as the students will realise very quickly that they might be able to keep repeating the behaviour but never get as far as the sanction.
    Set down very clear rules regarding warnings/sanctions. For example, a system like a previous poster suggested of one warning for the first misdemeanor, name on a board/list if it happens again and detention for the third time. Students of all ages respond better to rules and sanctions which are clear and consistent. Whatever you choose, the key is to always mean what you say. Empty threats only serve to undermine you.
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    (Original post by Harriet : ))
    I agree 5 is far too many! 3 I'd suggest, 1 verbal warning, if have to be warned a second time name goes on the board, if a 3rd then detention.
    So 2 warnings..?
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    Find out a bit about the child. If they have a sports club that they love on a certain night, then put their detention on that date, or if students love going to the chippy etc at lunch, keep them in then. It has to have negative implications for them to be effective.

    I also agree with two warnings. Explain when detention will be, and for how long, then if they push you to three strikes it has become their choice to have the detention.
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    (Original post by manchesterunited15)
    So 2 warnings..?
    Typo sorry! I did mean two
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    I personally think it'd be easier to keep your class in line if you were less consistent and more unpredictable with punishment. Having a regulated system of 'x warnings and that's a detention' is good in that it lets everybody know where they stand, but it also lets kids know how much they can get away with and will probably prompt complaints of unfairness if for some reason you have to deviate from it. On the other hand, if your pupils never know how serious a punishment they're going to get if they muck up, they'll be much less likely to do so. As long as you don't keep letting a single kid off lightly it could work.

    As others have said, five warnings is also way too many, ideally you'd want to crack down on bad behaviour as soon as it starts. I'd say one warning maximum, as warnings or threats of punishment have pretty much no effect on how kids are going to act. Giving out detentions the second kids step out of line makes an example of them and means people are less likely to copy them (and if necessary you can always privately rescind the detention or make it a short one if they didn't do too much wrong).
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    Break detentions work on good kids who are horrified to have got into any trouble at all. An after school detention would probably be too much for them.

    After school detention may be good for kids who have no work environment at home - gives them an opportunity to do their homework. (But not if after school detention consists of picking up litter.)

    Probably the best way of making them behave will be to talk to them to work out what is making them misbehave, then try to address that with them. But this is also the hardest way, because some kids just won't come to the table.

    You need to read 'It's your time you're wasting' by Frank Chalk. It won't help you, but it might make you laugh.
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    Just smack them on the arse with a ruler. Much more effective method.
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    (Original post by Harriet : ))
    What kind of behavioural procedure do they have in your school, e.g could you send them to the head of department or isolation/safety net/cooler?
    Officially, it is:

    1. Verbal warning
    2. Break time detention
    3. Either an incident report or removal from the lesson
    4. Call out for senior teacher (usually get put in isolation as a result)

    However, I have never witnessed any teacher applying the rules that strictly. By this, I mean I have never seen a teacher call out for senior teacher after a child called out four times.

    Note:
    Our department does not advise after-school because, according to our school policy, we need to inform the parents about this before we give them. This being because it is a rural school and most children have a school bus. We are, however, having a meeting next term as a faculty and I was thinking about bringing this up for discussion anyhow.
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    I never got an after-school one because I knew my mum would go mental, had a fair amount of break time ones though cos she wouldn't find out xD so the threat of after-school ones was more effective for me but I guess it depends how much your parents care about that sort of stuff/how much you value your break time...
    5 warnings is pretty bad aha, we had a system where you had 2 warnings then a D.T. so it was pretty easy to mess around until you got to the second warning then just shut up til next lesson... probably be more effective if it was less predictable...
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    (Original post by linkdapink)
    The worst is when you've given them a detention and then they keep misbehaving in class. There are only so many rooms I can remove pupils to!
    I can empathise!

    I teach bottom set Year 8 maths (out of 8 sets) with 28 in the class. I once had to remove three pupils and we actually struggled to do that since the rooms were all fully packed as it was. Unfortunately, we are under staffed as well so it was hard to find a teacher who had a free period and who could 'look after' them for that period. All in all, about 15 minutes of lesson time was wasted dealing with serious code of conduct breaches (I won't even mention the details).
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    (Original post by Dagnabbit)
    I can empathise!

    I teach bottom set Year 8 maths (out of 8 sets) with 28 in the class. I once had to remove three pupils and we actually struggled to do that since the rooms were all fully packed as it was. Unfortunately, we are under staffed as well so it was hard to find a teacher who had a free period and who could 'look after' them for that period. All in all, about 15 minutes of lesson time was wasted dealing with serious code of conduct breaches (I won't even mention the details).
    Ah, the woes of low ability. On my PGCE I never taught any particularly "low ability" kids. Now... my highest set is 4 out of 6 Y9s. It's a nightmare dealing with behavioural issues all the time. I have a very low set Y8 class, and I put a chair outside the classroom at the start of the lesson, because there are such a high number of kids with anger management issues (i.e. broken noses in the past) so I have to have it there to let them calm down sometimes! It's a nightmare!
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    (Original post by Dagnabbit)
    I am currently doing my PGCE, as some of you may know from the previous threads I have created here. I find myself giving a fair few break time detentions each week to the same minority of students. The problem is that a lot of them don't seem to show improvement, or some will behave well for the rest of the week and then gradually escalate.

    I must add that I'm not massively strict. I will often give several (roughly 5) warnings before issuing a detention unless there is an extreme circumstance, for example there was a student who threw a pen at me deliberately, he was given a detention straight off the bat.

    My questions are:

    * Do detentions ever seem to work (i.e. any 'success stories' you can share)?
    * Which are better: after-school or break-time detentions?
    * Any suggestions for alternative sanctions (within reason) so I don't need to keep giving detentions?

    Note: I am not going to disclose any information about the school or my course just in case I've given a detention to a TSR user, could be awkward.
    I agree with the others that 5 warnings is too much, at most, 3. I'm a teaching assistant at a saturday school and we have a 3 warning and you're out rule. If they come back in and disrupt the class in any way, parents will be called.

    From personal experience, I hated after school detentions and would try my best to avoid it eg be good in class, do homework for last lesson etc
    Detentions in break or lunch can be annoying but I really don't think it'll do much.
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    I never got a detention once at high school something I prided myself on. I was scared to death of them... But the ones who consistently get them aren't bothered at all
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    (Original post by jaime1986)
    Find out a bit about the child. If they have a sports club that they love on a certain night, then put their detention on that date, or if students love going to the chippy etc at lunch, keep them in then. It has to have negative implications for them to be effective.

    I also agree with two warnings. Explain when detention will be, and for how long, then if they push you to three strikes it has become their choice to have the detention.
    Not sure why this got a neg? I'm an NQT, bottom set Year 7 and Year 8 and a low year 11, all large classes and this has worked for me.
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    (Original post by jaime1986)
    Not sure why this got a neg? I'm an NQT, bottom set Year 7 and Year 8 and a low year 11, all large classes and this has worked for me.
    Neg certainly wasn't from me. I think it's a great idea to personalise discipline as it's unlikely that one scheme for discipline will be perfect for every student in the class, let alone the whole school.
 
 
 
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