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Britain ranked #27 on best countries to be born in 2013, down from #7 in 1988. Watch

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    i would never live in most of the countries above italy or uk, to be fair.
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    Another survey with a deeply flawed methodology. Nevermind.
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    The UAE, seriously?? I know wages are much higher, it's tax-free and there are lots of fancy skyscrapers, but the place has no real culture or history to the place - it's ridiculously spread out, unwalkable, devoted solely to extravagance and consists of super rich Arabs, wealthy westerners constantly getting drunk and loads of dirt poor south Asian migrant workers. Not the most balanced society!
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    (Original post by EssexDan86)
    The UAE, seriously?? I know wages are much higher, it's tax-free and there are lots of fancy skyscrapers, but the place has no real culture or history to the place - it's ridiculously spread out, unwalkable, devoted solely to extravagance and consists of super rich Arabs, wealthy westerners constantly getting drunk and loads of dirt poor south Asian migrant workers. Not the most balanced society!
    But its a good place to be born - if you're a citizen - because that means you're almost certainly hugely wealthy.

    UAE has a tiny native population because they won't let immigrants naturalise. As a result they're all stupidly rich.

    The entire article is stupid.
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    (Original post by GR3YFOXXX)
    I didn't forget either of the above, I was merely stating that the aforementioned are overshadowed by the positives I stated.

    TBH I think the neg was justified, you have removed your original comment...
    Well some may disagree with that. I understand the positives of Ireland but I don't deem them enough to be ranked that high if you compared it with the negatives. And were you seriously offended/annoyed because I was surprised at Ireland being so high compared to the UK? Despite a lot of people here being surprised? :confused: Touchy much? :lol:. Yes I removed it so people wouldn't start getting mad (and mass neg) when they feel I don't agree with the position of their country :|. Someone from Canada even negged me - and I agree entirely with it's (good) position! Lol.

    Anyways coming from the comments the people have written here, the criteria in which The Economist has based this list on does seem pretty stupid. Not to mention, there doesn't seem to be too much of a disparity between the scores anyways (at least regarding countries which are ranked near each other).
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    (Original post by The Assassin)
    Well some may disagree with that. I understand the positives of Ireland but I don't deem them enough to be ranked that high if you compared it with the negatives. And were you seriously offended/annoyed because I was surprised at Ireland being so high compared to the UK? Despite a lot of people here being surprised? :confused: Touchy much? :lol:. Yes I removed it so people wouldn't start getting mad (and mass neg) when they feel I don't agree with the position of their country :|. Someone from Canada even negged me - and I agree entirely with it's (good) position! Lol.

    Anyways coming from the comments the people have written here, the criteria in which The Economist has based this list on does seem pretty stupid. Not to mention, there doesn't seem to be too much of a disparity between the scores anyways (at least regarding countries which are ranked near each other).
    What qualifies you to be suprised about the quality of life in Ireland? Your comments were unreasonable, I am interested to know what they are based upon. If anyone seems touchy it's you, upset by the fact that Ireland out-ranked the UK in the survey.

    If you expected mass negs for your comment, then my neg was hardly unreasonable or unexpected.
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    (Original post by ncsoftlover)
    a great place to be born in and have a nice childhood, but suffer greatly in old age?
    Well no, who do you think is servicing this huge debt and paying for the services/benefits for this ageing population when they all retire in 15-20 years? Someone being born there now is going to have to pay for that via their taxes and the debt can only be reduced by a combination of increased taxes and reduced services.
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    Looks like yet another ranking system that's been made up by retards.

    Isreal, Kuwait and Chile are higher than Britain...

    Bull****.
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    (Original post by GR3YFOXXX)
    If anyone seems touchy it's you, upset by the fact that Ireland out-ranked the UK.

    If you expected mass negs then my neg was hardly unreasonable or unexpected.
    Ok, this will be my final post because you're really boring me now. I said I was 'surprised' - not uspet. Don't try and twist the words to make it fit your argument. Why would I be annoyed from a list that doesn't count for much? Unlike you on the other hand, who got mad because of that very opinion :lol:. Any arguments reflecting the opinion had been given by other users in this thread, thus anything I would write now would be superfluous. You still disagree? Fair enough. I don't really care. It's all a matter of opinion in the end.

    Sheesh, I try and be somewhat peaceful in my comment and you still continue.

    It's quite amusing how you're trying to justify that. No, I never expected that in the first place - but I saw that one neg from you then removed the comment because I never realised people would be so easily offended, and didn't want any more of it. Tbh it was more the amount of attacks I would receive rather than the negs (hence why I put mass neg in brackets). Fortunately though, despite me having it for some time afterwards, no one felt offended enough to neg me (or the other the other criticisers of Ireland in this thread). Oh well, enjoy your neg back. :lol: Bye!
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    (Original post by The Assassin)
    Ok, this will be my final post because you're really boring me now. I said I was 'surprised' - not uspet. Don't try and twist the words to make it fit your argument. Why would I be annoyed from a list that doesn't count for much? Unlike you on the other hand, who got mad because of that very opinion :lol:. Any arguments reflecting the opinion had been given by other users in this thread, thus anything I would write now would be superfluous. You still disagree? Fair enough. I don't really care. It's all a matter of opinion in the end.

    Sheesh, I try and be somewhat peaceful in my comment and you still continue.

    It's quite amusing how you're trying to justify that. No, I never expected that in the first place - but I saw that one neg from you then removed the comment because I never realised people would be so easily offended, and didn't want any more of it. Tbh it was more the amount of attacks I would receive rather than the negs (hence why I put mass neg in brackets). Fortunately though, despite me having it for some time afterwards, no one felt offended enough to neg me (or the other the other criticisers of Ireland in this thread). Oh well, enjoy your neg back. :lol: Bye!
    Where did I say I was mad? If you fancy being pedantic over language, I said that you seem to be annoyed.

    You didn't qualify what your opinion was based on. I negged your opinion because it provided no explanation or justification for your suprise. Enjoy your tit-for-tat negging, hope it brightens up your day.
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    (Original post by GR3YFOXXX)
    1. UCD and Trinity are great Uni's. It has nothing to do with complex A level requirements. The survey is about countries to be born in, you were not born in R.O.I nor was anyone else doing A levels, your understanding of their entry requirements is irrelevant. Furthermore, I wasn't comparing them with British Universities, I was just objectively stating that they were excellent Universities. And for the record I actually studied in Queens, I'm not biased towards Irish Uni's.

    2. See Irish Wages...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...%29_per_capita

    Higher than the UK in every one of those listings, and thats post recession.

    3. More high end jobs in Britain? I'm not comparing Ireland to GB, the ROI has a high number of multinational corporations based in Dublin due to the 12.5% corporation tax. Per person of population, the ROI has an extremely well developed corporate and finacial sectors.

    4. I don't believe N.I and ROI are one entity, stop trying to offload the UK's problem on to the ROI.

    5. Those are not Irish presidents you've listed, they're Taoiseach. The last three Presidents have been, Mary Robinson, Mary McAleese, Michael D. Higgins. You don't have a basic grasp on Irish politics, yet you somehow claim to know enough to pass judgement...
    To be perfectly honest, I'm getting a bit fed up with this whole thing. You seem set on not reading other posts before posting (because then you'll find your points have already basically been mentioned and therefore don't bring anything new to the discussion). Point 5 has already been pointed out. Point 4; well, it's not the 'North' if you don't believe that so maybe you need to look at borders and realise Northern Ireland is not called North Ireland?

    Also, are you also really trying to argue that Ireland is in a better way than Britain is through jobs and business? Really? You do remember Ireland being bailed out, right? You also remember the Euro being awful, yes?

    Anyway, point 1: 2 universities. 2. I could name you at least 20 'great' universities from Britain (then there's really more). Stop being so obsessive over the two universities Ireland has when Scotland has at least 2 great universities, with England having double figures of great ones.
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    (Original post by Zürich)
    The survey is about which country it is best to be born in, so the fact that entry requirements for A-Levels are complex does not change anything, since most Irish people sit their own examinations(I would imagine). Considering Ireland is a country of 4m people, having 2 awesome universities and a host of decent ones is impressive. Of course Britain would have more class universities with 60m people.

    Ireland has extremely high wages. Of course the recession has had an impact but fundamentally Ireland is a very high skilled economy with ****
    loads of high tech companies etc.

    Ireland certainly has one of the most impressive political systems in Europe imo. You never ever read about far right/far left parties and generally the country is extremely moderate and sensible. Contrast that with the likes of Belgium, Greece, Holland, Spain which are regularly in political disarray.


    In general I can understand why Ireland is so high up. Crime is ridiculously low, the education system is great, wages are high, the health system is great, culturally there seems to be always something coming out of Ireland. Personally, I would prefer to live in London. But if you offered me the chance to live in a random part of the UK or a random part of Ireland I would take the latter.

    ----

    The best country is undoubtedly Switzerland and to a lesser extent Austria. They really have cracked it.
    Point 1: That's fair enough, but you do have to admit there is more choice in Britain of where to go to, and Ireland cannot offer the same choice.

    Despite Ireland's political system, they still have issues. They needed a massive bail out, remember, and that's not something that can be swept under the carpet. Something went badly wrong, and from a political perspective that's not exactly anything to be proud of. Although, I do agree, it is much more stable than other countries in Europe like those you have listed.
    I also feel that some of Ireland's policies are quite old fashioned and not really fit for purpose anymore (as much as you might argue against her death, the woman who died after being refused an abortion certainly would have had more of a chance if it would have been performed, surely?).

    To be honest, I wouldn't say crime is low. I don't have any statistics close to hand, but with a smaller population surely you'd expect much lower crime rates? Plus, every time I've been to Dublin, the amount of homeless people in the city centre was overwhelming. I also got several people saying to me "why did you leave there to come here?" with a look of shock on their faces. I don't think society is as rosy as you think in Ireland, at least there is a part of society which disagree with your reasoning.

    Anyway, I'm not hating Ireland in any sense; Northern Ireland if people like it or not is on the same island and therefore physically at least shares some of it's atributes (although, in my opinion, the border is very strong).

    I feel that Ireland can be quite barren place, especially in the west, and with the agriculture sector falling apart (which is still fairly big in Ireland, especially in the aforementioned west), I can definitely see the economy suffering.
    Britain's farms, at least in England, are much larger, more industrialised and intensive. They, perhaps, can survive, but in Northern Ireland (and I'd say Ireland will share many of these problems), the farms are smaller, and no one wants to continue with it anymore. It's simply not worth it.
    So, Ireland may well have slightly higher wages and more business, but the depletion of a traditional sector is something that will hit it harder than anyone expects it to.
    There is more economic downturn to hit Ireland, that much is granted.

    Although, just out of curiosity, you said you'd rather live in Ireland than some random place in Britain? What if that was a little town in the west? Would you be willing to live there?
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    (Original post by snailsareslimy)
    To be perfectly honest, I'm getting a bit fed up with this whole thing. You seem set on not reading other posts before posting (because then you'll find your points have already basically been mentioned and therefore don't bring anything new to the discussion). Point 5 has already been pointed out. Point 4; well, it's not the 'North' if you don't believe that so maybe you need to look at borders and realise Northern Ireland is not called North Ireland?

    Also, are you also really trying to argue that Ireland is in a better way than Britain is through jobs and business? Really? You do remember Ireland being bailed out, right? You also remember the Euro being awful, yes?

    Anyway, point 1: 2 universities. 2. I could name you at least 20 'great' universities from Britain (then there's really more). Stop being so obsessive over the two universities Ireland has when Scotland has at least 2 great universities, with England having double figures of great ones.
    I've only read the responses I've been quoted in. It only make sense that other people would point out your inaccuracies as well, sorry for making you have to read about them twice.

    I didn't say it was called North Ireland. I merely said "the North", it's a widely known fact that Northern Ireland is largely on the North of the Island, whilst R.O.I is largely located on the south of the Island. I bet you've referred to N.I as Ulster more than once?

    No, I said wages are higher in Ireland than in the UK. The level of foreign corporate investment in the ROI is astonishing for a nation of its size.

    What do you mean the Euro being awful? Parts of the eurozone were involved in a financial crisis yes, but many other parts were not. Germany functions perfectly well with the Euro as it's currency, as do many other member states. The eurozone crisis is largely a result of a global credit crisis which affected several eurozone economies, it has nothing to do with the euro as an item of currency. If anything the eurozone save Ireland from the effects of a global financial crisis as it encourged strong european economies to support the Irish banking industry and prevent it's collapse. But this is a tangential side point at best.

    I'm not being "obsessive" about Irish Universities, as I said before I studied at Queens. The point I made was that Ireland has a great, free, third level education system which contributes to the fact that it is recognised as a great place to be born. You keep comparing Ireland in absolute size to the UK. The UK has 60 million people, Ireland has 4.5 million.

    You seem to confuse my defence of Irelands high ranking with an attack on the UK. The UK is undoubtedly a great place to be born, but people here seem shocked to find that Ireland hasn't crumbled since the British left in 1921.

    Please stay on topic, it looks like you're beginning to ramble.
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    But its a good place to be born - if you're a citizen - because that means you're almost certainly hugely wealthy.

    UAE has a tiny native population because they won't let immigrants naturalise. As a result they're all stupidly rich.

    The entire article is stupid.
    Though this says best countries to be born in, not best country to be born in as a citizen!

    And as others have said, wealth isn't everything. I wouldn't have found being held at gunpoint by police for drinking orange juice on a fasting day a particularly positive life experience regardless of whether I was wealthy or not!

    (Though the UAE is not remotely as bad as the likes of Saudi Arabia, despite what several people on here seem to think!)
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    (Original post by snailsareslimy)
    Point 1: That's fair enough, but you do have to admit there is more choice in Britain of where to go to, and Ireland cannot offer the same choice.

    Despite Ireland's political system, they still have issues. They needed a massive bail out, remember, and that's not something that can be swept under the carpet. Something went badly wrong, and from a political perspective that's not exactly anything to be proud of. Although, I do agree, it is much more stable than other countries in Europe like those you have listed.
    I also feel that some of Ireland's policies are quite old fashioned and not really fit for purpose anymore (as much as you might argue against her death, the woman who died after being refused an abortion certainly would have had more of a chance if it would have been performed, surely?).

    To be honest, I wouldn't say crime is low. I don't have any statistics close to hand, but with a smaller population surely you'd expect much lower crime rates? Plus, every time I've been to Dublin, the amount of homeless people in the city centre was overwhelming. I also got several people saying to me "why did you leave there to come here?" with a look of shock on their faces. I don't think society is as rosy as you think in Ireland, at least there is a part of society which disagree with your reasoning.

    Anyway, I'm not hating Ireland in any sense; Northern Ireland if people like it or not is on the same island and therefore physically at least shares some of it's atributes (although, in my opinion, the border is very strong).

    I feel that Ireland can be quite barren place, especially in the west, and with the agriculture sector falling apart (which is still fairly big in Ireland, especially in the aforementioned west), I can definitely see the economy suffering.
    Britain's farms, at least in England, are much larger, more industrialised and intensive. They, perhaps, can survive, but in Northern Ireland (and I'd say Ireland will share many of these problems), the farms are smaller, and no one wants to continue with it anymore. It's simply not worth it.
    So, Ireland may well have slightly higher wages and more business, but the depletion of a traditional sector is something that will hit it harder than anyone expects it to.
    There is more economic downturn to hit Ireland, that much is granted.

    Although, just out of curiosity, you said you'd rather live in Ireland than some random place in Britain? What if that was a little town in the west? Would you be willing to live there?
    What nonsense, Northern Irelands abortion laws are actually more draconian and restrictive than the republics.

    Crime statistics are based on per person of population, not absolute population, your point makes absolutely no sense.

    Homelessness is much worse in other places... (Belfast and London in particular!)

    The West coast of Ireland is probably one of the most beautiful places in the world...

    Farming in hardly the backbone of any developed economy. Furthermore, global trends have shown farming revenue to be on the decline in every post-industrialised economy for the last 30 years. This is an issue affecting not only Ireland. That being said Irelands agricultural economy has benefited vastly from EC membership.

    The Wall Street Journal and Times magazine have predicted that the ROI would be one of the first countries to recover from the recession due to having a favourable corporate environment, EC membership and a large pool of highly skilled graduates.
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    (Original post by GR3YFOXXX)
    I've only read the responses I've been quoted in. It only make sense that other people would point out your inaccuracies as well, sorry for making you have to read about them twice.

    I didn't say it was called North Ireland. I merely said "the North", it's a widely known fact that Northern Ireland is largely on the North of the Island, whilst R.O.I is largely located on the south of the Island. I bet you've referred to N.I as Ulster more than once?

    No, I said wages are higher in Ireland than in the UK. The level of foreign corporate investment in the ROI is astonishing for a nation of its size.

    What do you mean the Euro being awful? Parts of the eurozone were involved in a financial crisis yes, but many other parts were not. Germany functions perfectly well with the Euro as it's currency, as do many other member states. The eurozone crisis is largely a result of a global credit crisis which affected several eurozone economies, it has nothing to do with the euro as an item of currency. If anything the eurozone save Ireland from the effects of a global financial crisis as it encourged strong european economies to support the Irish banking industry and prevent it's collapse. But this is a tangential side point at best.

    I'm not being "obsessive" about Irish Universities, as I said before I studied at Queens. The point I made was that Ireland has a great, free, third level education system which contributes to the fact that it is recognised as a great place to be born. You keep comparing Ireland in absolute size to the UK. The UK has 60 million people, Ireland has 4.5 million.

    You seem to confuse my defence of Irelands high ranking with an attack on the UK. The UK is undoubtedly a great place to be born, but people here seem shocked to find that Ireland hasn't crumbled since the British left in 1921.

    Please stay on topic, it looks like you're beginning to ramble.
    Why would I call it Ulster? That includes Donegal, Cavan and Monaghan... Totally ridiculous to call it something it isn't.

    But good point you made: Irish banking. Awful, isn't it? That's all I need to say on that point.

    Education wise, you still have to pay for accommodation so it's hardly completely free?

    Anyway, I'm done with this topic of conversation. If rambling is someone's point of view then fair enough, I'll not "ramble" anymore.
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    (Original post by silverbolt)
    Economic downturn aside - Ireland is a great place to live. Id prefer it over the UK any day of the week.
    why so?
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    (Original post by GR3YFOXXX)
    What nonsense, Northern Irelands abortion laws are more restrictive than the republics.

    Crime statistics are based on per person, not absolute population...

    Homelessness is much worse in other places... (Belfast and London in particular!)

    The West of Ireland is probably the most beautiful places in the world...

    Farming in hardly the backbone of any developed economy. Furthermore, global trends have shown farming on the decline in every post-industrialised economy for the last 30 years, not only Ireland. That being said Irelands agricultural economy has benefited vastly from EC membership.

    The Wall Street Journal and Times magazine predicted that the ROI would be one of the first countries to recover from the recession do to the favourable corporate environment, EC membership and highly skilled graduates.
    New abortion clinic opening is hardly restrictive? And I haven't seen as many in Belfast or London, Dublin was full of them and it was a very sorry sight :/

    You're now talking about farming... Something you know nothing about. All the EC membership has done has suck life out of it, honestly do not believe anything as ridiculous as that until you've seen the physical proof (which every farmer will tell you is that it hasn't doe anything good for the sector).
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    (Original post by snailsareslimy)
    Why would I call it Ulster? That includes Donegal, Cavan and Monaghan... Totally ridiculous to call it something it isn't.

    But good point you made: Irish banking. Awful, isn't it? That's all I need to say on that point.

    Education wise, you still have to pay for accommodation so it's hardly completely free?

    Anyway, I'm done with this topic of conversation. If rambling is someone's point of view then fair enough, I'll not "ramble" anymore.
    Good because you've made absolutely no valid points, leave the discussion to someone who actually understands what they are talking about.

    Irish banking? Try global banking. The financial crisis originated in the deregulated US and UK banking regimes. Don't forget the US/UK/EU banking regimes all required bailing out.
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    Got to be honest, I think those rankings are dodgy, Britain's not perfect, but it's comfortably better in terms of standards of living than many of the countries listed above it! I read it starting from the back and as I got closer to #1.) I was expecting to see North Korea or something up there - Switzerland was a pleasant surprise!


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