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    Okay, so ideally i'm looking for a medical student or someone who has ADHD themselves to give me their opinion.

    Im 19 years old.

    I have a hard time making myself concentrate on work. I leave everything to last minute, I only started revising a week before my GCSES and A-Levels. I even left revision for the night before my A2 Business studies exam and had to stay up all night. I did get good grades however. Right now I have 2 essays, 1 logbook and 1 sketching project to complete for 5 days time and am nowhere near finished, all because I left it till last minute.

    I have impulses I find hard to control, such as if its 11pm say and I see a can of Coke, even though I know it will ruin my sleep, I will still drink it and then regret it straight away.

    At home where I am not shy, I will come out with random outbursts like random phrases for no reason.

    I can concentrate fully on tasks I like, such as video games and even forget to eat while playing them.

    I talk alot inside my head and sometimes can remember things properly due to everything in my head, sometimes I cant even complete a basic calculation in my head like 2 x 7 without a few goes. This is in extreme cases and doesn't happen all the time.

    As a child I was hyperactive and was banned from E numbers to try and calm me down.

    Sometimes I get bursts of excitement for no reason which last like 2 seconds and makes my whole body move.

    At home and around those I am comfortable with, I will talk lots and lots.

    I have been with social anxiety so when around others I don't show these characteristics as I have learnt to not make myself stand out.

    I have poor organisational skills.

    I get impatient alot.

    As a child I had OCD.

    I just want to know as I am fed up of my life ruined by my lack of organisation. I have had no fun this xmas due to having to complete my uni work and not getting much done each day and so having to keep doing it. I am now left with a situation where I am unlikely to get it finished and if I do, it won't be to the best of my ability.
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    Please can somebody give me their opinion.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Please can somebody give me their opinion.
    I have these exact same problems in quite an extreme form. I've never been diagnosed with ADHD but often wondered if maybe that's what it is or if there's some slightly variant condition with these symptoms. Sorry I can't help you, but I'm interested to here any answers too.
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    I think you do, but my opinion isn't valid as I'm not qualified to say. It's probably best to get a proper diagnosis and go from there.
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    I was diagnosed with ADHD when I was 11 and I have to say, it doesn't sound like you have it. I'm now a medical student so have seen it from both an insider and outsider/clinician's point of view!

    ADHD is awful - I was up and out of my chair every few minutes (even as a teenager!) and had no control over these impulses - the fact that you can 'not show these characteristics around others' indicates that you have some control over it. I used to forget things all the time, would stop in the middle of doing things to do something else, was unable to follow simple instructions without getting distracted and would constantly move around and talk and interrupt people. Most importantly to me personally, this wasn't me being a bored, disruptive child: I used to get extremely upset over it and feel ashamed at being unable to control myself despite really really wanting to.

    I know plenty of people like you who leave everything to the last minute, are a bit disorganised and chatty - I don't think you have anything to worry about
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    (Original post by jesterjess)
    I was diagnosed with ADHD when I was 11 and I have to say, it doesn't sound like you have it. I'm now a medical student so have seen it from both an insider and outsider/clinician's point of view!

    ADHD is awful - I was up and out of my chair every few minutes (even as a teenager!) and had no control over these impulses - the fact that you can 'not show these characteristics around others' indicates that you have some control over it. I used to forget things all the time, would stop in the middle of doing things to do something else, was unable to follow simple instructions without getting distracted and would constantly move around and talk and interrupt people. Most importantly to me personally, this wasn't me being a bored, disruptive child: I used to get extremely upset over it and feel ashamed at being unable to control myself despite really really wanting to.

    I know plenty of people like you who leave everything to the last minute, are a bit disorganised and chatty - I don't think you have anything to worry about
    Maybe I just have really bad procrastination and time management skills etc. Maybe I should look online for ways to become more motivated and organised.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Maybe I just have really bad procrastination and time management skills etc. Maybe I should look online for ways to become more motivated and organised.
    I procrastinate dreadfully but I definitely think it's nothing to do with my ADHD because when I start working I'm fine! Revising for exams for example - I'd read a couple of pages or do a little bit of work before even getting out of bed (because one of my largest areas of procrastination is getting ready - taking time over breakfast, having a long shower etc). This meant that I'd already started work for the day and mentally made it easier to work later on because often starting is the hardest bit. I'd also be careful to switch off the computer unless I really needed it because browsing, YouTube, Facebook etc all make it easy to say 'Just one more' over and over! Removing temptation is good for someone with poor impulse control

    Time management was definitely something I attribute to my ADHD and luckily (with the help of my behavioural therapist) I've been able to overcome it. I switched from using my phone for organising myself to an old-school paper diary. It has a diary with a month view and a week view (month view for long term planning and week view for more detail) followed by my degree timetable and other little bits of pieces. It also has a notes section and I've found this whole set up really really helpful. I keep it with me all the time and it has everything I need to keep myself organised in one place - a symptom of ADHD is not retaining information so having it written down in a way which I can handle physically and flick through is good for sorting it out in my head. It also has my revision schedule in it - the best way I've found to do this isn't to say exactly what you're going to be doing at different times in the day but to have a goal for each piece of revision and one goal for fun. E.g. "Revise psychiatry lectures until I can recite the symptoms and diagnostics for ADHD, and restring my guitar"

    I know your situation won't be the same as mine but little tips and tricks do wonders When I was a little younger I had a reward chart for a) resisting impulses (mostly things like interrupting conversations or sitting in my place for a whole lesson) and b) getting things started straight away. Even though it was fairly babyish I found it really helped.
    • #3
    #3

    I suggest you visit your local GP if you have any concerns about your mental health.

    The process:
    Local GP > Referral for Psych consult > Psych Nurse will make initial assessment > Psych will make the final assessment and may confirm diagnosis or suggest a differential etc
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    I have *VERY* similar symptoms. The previous poster had ADHD, but I think we may have ADD which doesn't have the hyperactivity part- that could explain a lot of the behavioral differences. See the Wikipedia article here- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attention_deficit_disorder

    PS I'm 19 also.
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    Surely, if you can concentrate, you can't have anything like?
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    Surely, if you can concentrate, you can't have anything like?
    The only thing he (or she, obviously) said he could concentrate on was video games. This isn't of much use, is it?! They are basically designed to hold concentration.

    I'm just annoyed people are saying he doesn't have ADHD; if he doesn't, then fine, he can get diagnosed by a GP possibly with something else; if he does have ADHD, then it's great he finds out now to have the effects dealt with.

    I would ask, do you think this experience sounds normal? And if not, it must either be ADHD or something else, so if not ADHD does anyone know what else it could be?

    PS I find this wikipedia article on ADD quite informative http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attention_deficit_disorder
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    (Original post by lukeuser)
    The only thing he (or she, obviously) said he could concentrate on was video games. This isn't of much use, is it?! They are basically designed to hold concentration.
    But there could be other reasons for it. I've got Autism and various sensory issues. I can only concentrate on doing things if there are certain conditions.
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    (Original post by lukeuser)
    I'm just annoyed people are saying he doesn't have ADHD; if he doesn't, then fine, he can get diagnosed by a GP possibly with something else; if he does have ADHD, then it's great he finds out now to have the effects dealt with.

    I would ask, do you think this experience sounds normal? And if not, it must either be ADHD or something else, so if not ADHD does anyone know what else it could be?

    PS I find this wikipedia article on ADD quite informative http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attention_deficit_disorder
    I wasn't saying the OP didn't have ADHD - I was giving my own opinion as both a diagnosee and a medical student as he or she requested. And what is normal? If my very serious, shy bookworm of a friend started acting like this I would be worried. But on the other hand, plenty of my other friends leave things to the last minute and act a bit nutty sometimes (even moreso than me, who has an official diagnosis of ADHD and years of therapy under my belt). It doesn't have to be ADHD - maybe some better habits would be of more help.

    ADHD or any of its subtypes (like ADD) are serious disorders and can't be diagnosed over the internet, or using websites like wikipedia (which as medical students we are told to avoid like the plague due to some of it being very convincing but still incorrect).

    In addition, they are hard to diagnose because some children simply are just much more energetic than others. Lots of people have said to me 'ADHD is made up, it's just parents wanting an excuse for their kids bad behaviour' but those who knew me during my worst patches knew something was seriously medically wrong. It isn't something that people miss - generally others will advise you to see a doctor before you realise yourself (partly because onset is usually at a young age and tends to settle down as you enter puberty). Mild ADHD would really just be kids being kids

    Finally, ADD is very different to the symptoms the OP has described - I met lots of children with it during my CBT (therapy) sessions. In fact, the symptoms described are almost all on the hyperactive spectrum not the attention-deficit one so if you had to be diagnosed with one I would definitely lean towards the ADHD diagnosis and not the ADD. But what do I know, I've only studied this for a few months and am still a couple of years off of qualifying as a doctor.

    Good luck with everything OP, feel free to message me if you have any questions whether or not you end up with a diagnosis.
    • #4
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Okay, so ideally i'm looking for a medical student or someone who has ADHD themselves to give me their opinion.

    Im 19 years old.

    I have a hard time making myself concentrate on work. I leave everything to last minute, I only started revising a week before my GCSES and A-Levels. I even left revision for the night before my A2 Business studies exam and had to stay up all night. I did get good grades however. Right now I have 2 essays, 1 logbook and 1 sketching project to complete for 5 days time and am nowhere near finished, all because I left it till last minute.
    .
    Well... having ADHD doesn't just mean that someone had certain symptom, it means that their symptoms are persistant and cause them to be be substantially impaired on a day to day basis, getting good grades does require quality concentration, but if you think you may have ADHD then go to your GP and ask to be refered to a psychiatrist.

    Procrastination is a very common problem for students:

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/...tinating-exams

    There are lots of reasons why a person may struggle with organisation including learning disabilities like dyslexia and dyspraxia.
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    (Original post by jesterjess)
    I wasn't saying the OP didn't have ADHD - I was giving my own opinion as both a diagnosee and a medical student as he or she requested. And what is normal? If my very serious, shy bookworm of a friend started acting like this I would be worried. But on the other hand, plenty of my other friends leave things to the last minute and act a bit nutty sometimes (even moreso than me, who has an official diagnosis of ADHD and years of therapy under my belt). It doesn't have to be ADHD - maybe some better habits would be of more help.

    ADHD or any of its subtypes (like ADD) are serious disorders and can't be diagnosed over the internet, or using websites like wikipedia (which as medical students we are told to avoid like the plague due to some of it being very convincing but still incorrect).

    In addition, they are hard to diagnose because some children simply are just much more energetic than others. Lots of people have said to me 'ADHD is made up, it's just parents wanting an excuse for their kids bad behaviour' but those who knew me during my worst patches knew something was seriously medically wrong. It isn't something that people miss - generally others will advise you to see a doctor before you realise yourself (partly because onset is usually at a young age and tends to settle down as you enter puberty). Mild ADHD would really just be kids being kids

    Finally, ADD is very different to the symptoms the OP has described - I met lots of children with it during my CBT (therapy) sessions. In fact, the symptoms described are almost all on the hyperactive spectrum not the attention-deficit one so if you had to be diagnosed with one I would definitely lean towards the ADHD diagnosis and not the ADD. But what do I know, I've only studied this for a few months and am still a couple of years off of qualifying as a doctor.

    Good luck with everything OP, feel free to message me if you have any questions whether or not you end up with a diagnosis.
    He's not a child though, he's 19, a lot of your points are aimed at children with ADHD, which is obviously quite different.

    I completely take your point about this being over the internet, and I foresaw someone criticising Wikipedia, which is why I didn't quote it, I just added it if anyone wanted to read it.

    About the ADD rather than ADHD, yes, I see that I was probably wrong about that, rereading the original post; I was thinking more about myself.

    Regarding comments suggesting the problems aren't significant enough, well, you could be right, and I'm obviously biased since I identified with a lot of OPs symptoms. But I can't help thinking there's a difference between acting nutty sometimes like you mention, and this causing problems in your education. Considering he/she only revised for A2 Business studies the night before it and still done well- surely this means he/she is quite intelligent/academic. Whereas most who postpone important things like A-level revision don't care about it or can't do it (I'm making crass assumptions based on my limited experiences, sorry).

    (Original post by OU Student)
    But there could be other reasons for it. I've got Autism and various sensory issues. I can only concentrate on doing things if there are certain conditions.
    For example, I can concentrate very well on computer games, good films and many books, but I find it very hard to concentrate on homework questions which are difficult or require a lot of work- it takes me *ages* to complete. For me it appears to be based on how easy the task is. Obviously I'm not saying that the OP doesn't have some other condition than ADHD, I'm really just saying that things like computer games are always going to be much easier to concentrate on than work.
 
 
 
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