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    For a simple pendulum, when we consider amplitude and displacement, is it just the horizontal component from the equilibrium position with respect to the ground (as opposed to the arc it makes or the diagonal from equilibrium)?

    Thanks.
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      (Original post by fayled)
      For a simple pendulum, when we consider amplitude and displacement, is it just the horizontal component from the equilibrium position with respect to the ground (as opposed to the arc it makes or the diagonal from equilibrium)?

      Thanks.
      Displacement is, strictly speaking, an angle for a pendulum.
      But take a look at this thread where this was discussed recently.

      Edited to include the correct link below.
      http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...php?p=40616936
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      (Original post by Stonebridge)
      Displacement is, strictly speaking, an angle for a pendulum.
      But take a look at this thread where this was discussed recently.
      http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...bble%20chamber
      Oh that makes more sense. By the way I'm not sure if the link is the one you intended to post - it seems to be to do with magnetic fields...
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        (Original post by fayled)
        Oh that makes more sense. By the way I'm not sure if the link is the one you intended to post - it seems to be to do with magnetic fields...
        I'm not sure what happened there.

        This is the correct link.

        http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...php?p=40616936
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        (Original post by Stonebridge)
        I'm not sure what happened there.

        This is the correct link.

        http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...php?p=40616936
        By the way this is completely unrelated, but if I was talking about a coil in a magnetic field, then if I said normal to the coil face, would this be along the same line as the plane of the coil.

        When I say both of these terms I mean them as the red line in the diagram (black bit is a coil).

        Thanks.
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          (Original post by fayled)
          By the way this is completely unrelated, but if I was talking about a coil in a magnetic field, then if I said normal to the coil face, would this be along the same line as the plane of the coil.

          When I say both of these terms I mean them as the red line in the diagram (black bit is a coil).

          Thanks.
          Normal to the coil face is like saying normal to a surface.
          The normal comes out of the surface (coil) at right angles to the plane.
          The normal to your computer screen would be a line coming out of it at right angles to any line you care to draw on the surface.
         
         
         
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