Best martial art for beginners? Watch

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Mad Cat Lady
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Hi not sure if this is the right place but I thought people here might be knowledgeable about this!

Basically I'm the most unfit, uncoordinated and unsporty person ever (mainly because I've always been laughed at for being bad at sport even when I was skinny, and thus I've grown a healthy hatred of it, NOT because of lack of effort), but I really want to learn to defend myself because I often have to walk alone in the dark in dodgy areas.

Can someone recommend me the best martial art for self-defence for someone like me? I've never done a martial art before!

Ta
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~*starlight*conquest*~
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The best martial art for you will depend on your personality, and what you want out of it.

Self Defense ONLY: Go for Judo or Ju-jitsu. Judo will teach you how to use other people's own body weight against them to throw or grapple them to the floor. Ju-jitsu focuses more on grabs and locks to immobilise your attacker. If you are particularly light or petite, perhaps Ju-jitsu would be better.

Self Defense & Attack: Defending yourself is great if you think you can out-run your opponent after taking them to the floor/releasing yourself from their clutch, but if you are against more than one person, or your attacker is faster than you, or too persistent, or there is nowhere to run to, then you'll want to learn to attack as well. Karate is probably the best all-round for attack and defense, but it tends to be a very strict and rigid martial art. Taekwondo is very similar to Karate but focuses on kicking attacks a little more, and is regarded a bit more as a sport rather than a martial art (it's more light-hearted and flexible in its movements). Muay Thai uses elbows and knees to attack, but you'll need to fight at close range, and I don't know whether it teaches much in self-defense techniques other than shielding your body from attacks. I don't know much about Kickboxing, but I imagine it's pretty similar to Muay Thai.

If you have the time, why not combine, say, Ju-Jitsu and Taekwondo, and learn the best of both worlds that way? (Slight bias here as I'm a Taekwondo fanatic .

Go to a few classes of different types of martial arts around you. Watch the other students and see how good or confident they are. It will give you an idea of how good the teaching is. You can't fit every aspect of a martial art into one class though, so go to a few in a row and see if they try different things. The more often they train, the better. If you can find a class that trains more than twice a week, then maybe go for that one; you'll progress a LOT faster.

Hope this helped
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Mad Cat Lady
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(Original post by ~*starlight*conquest*~)
The best martial art for you will depend on your personality, and what you want out of it.

Self Defense ONLY: Go for Judo or Ju-jitsu. Judo will teach you how to use other people's own body weight against them to throw or grapple them to the floor. Ju-jitsu focuses more on grabs and locks to immobilise your attacker. If you are particularly light or petite, perhaps Ju-jitsu would be better.

Self Defense & Attack: Defending yourself is great if you think you can out-run your opponent after taking them to the floor/releasing yourself from their clutch, but if you are against more than one person, or your attacker is faster than you, or too persistent, or there is nowhere to run to, then you'll want to learn to attack as well. Karate is probably the best all-round for attack and defense, but it tends to be a very strict and rigid martial art. Taekwondo is very similar to Karate but focuses on kicking attacks a little more, and is regarded a bit more as a sport rather than a martial art (it's more light-hearted and flexible in its movements). Muay Thai uses elbows and knees to attack, but you'll need to fight at close range, and I don't know whether it teaches much in self-defense techniques other than shielding your body from attacks. I don't know much about Kickboxing, but I imagine it's pretty similar to Muay Thai.

If you have the time, why not combine, say, Ju-Jitsu and Taekwondo, and learn the best of both worlds that way? (Slight bias here as I'm a Taekwondo fanatic .

Go to a few classes of different types of martial arts around you. Watch the other students and see how good or confident they are. It will give you an idea of how good the teaching is. You can't fit every aspect of a martial art into one class though, so go to a few in a row and see if they try different things. The more often they train, the better. If you can find a class that trains more than twice a week, then maybe go for that one; you'll progress a LOT faster.

Hope this helped
Thank you that was much more helpful than expected!
Taekwondo does sound tempting as my legs are relatively strong and I'm quite flexible.

Do you know anything about aikido?
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Enigma Machine
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I've always wanted to learn Wing Chun...
But if you are looking for self defense, a while ago some people came into our school and taught us about about self defense... I think this is their website http://www.hopwooduk.com/
When they came in they gave us demos on how to handle particular situations etc.
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Rainingshame
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(Original post by Mad Cat Lady)
Hi not sure if this is the right place but I thought people here might be knowledgeable about this!

Basically I'm the most unfit, uncoordinated and unsporty person ever (mainly because I've always been laughed at for being bad at sport even when I was skinny, and thus I've grown a healthy hatred of it, NOT because of lack of effort), but I really want to learn to defend myself because I often have to walk alone in the dark in dodgy areas.

Can someone recommend me the best martial art for self-defence for someone like me? I've never done a martial art before!

Ta
In reality for a martial to truly help you it is going to take time for you to learn, become strong and fast enough to pull of and have practised the moves. The person above said Wing Chun and although this probably would help you the most the amount of time for it to become fully effective is around 5-10 years from what I've heard. I'd say Kick boxing would be your best bet and thai kick boxing which is supposed to be rougher would probably be even better. Mix that in with some judo and you should be ven better. Even then expect some time (~1 year until you see some effect and up to 5 or 6 before you start to master it) before it'll help you considerably. My advice until then would be to avoid dodgy alleyways and to carry pepper spray on you. Just run and then pepper spray them in the eyes if they catch up. In 5 years time you'll probably be able to kick them after for good measure.
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Dukeofwembley
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krav maga, or brazilian ju jitsu

idf and israeli police use krav maga

tae kwon do is useless in a street fight

a bjj with 1 year experience can beat masters of tae kwon do!

look



the guys who fight in the video are experts

the israeli one
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~*starlight*conquest*~
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(Original post by Dukeofwembley)
krav maga, or brazilian ju jitsu

idf and israeli police use krav maga

tae kwon do is useless in a street fight

a bjj with 1 year experience can beat masters of tae kwon do!

look
I wouldn't say taekwondo is useless in a street fight. Yes, there are better martial arts out there for street fights, but it can still be used. I have a male friend who just seems to attract trouble even though he's really not provocative in any way. He's average height and in the lightweight category, but in the three incidences where he's been attacked in the street at night, he was able to successfully defend himself and attack the offender without getting himself hurt. And although he's been practicing for a while he's only a blue belt.

You can't say 'this guy can beat that guy with a different martial art' and then immediately assume that the winning guy has the better martial art. How good you are in a street fight will very much depend on YOU as an individual. Some people just put more effort into their training, and some people are just better fighters than others. And then some martial arts are strong against some types of martial arts, but weak against others (just like pokemon haha!).

Mad Cat Lady

Thank you that was much more helpful than expected!
Taekwondo does sound tempting as my legs are relatively strong and I'm quite flexible.

Do you know anything about aikido?
That's good to hear! I do have a tendency to ramble haha!

Sounds good! If that's the case I'd definitely go for a kicking art!
I'm not really familiar with aikido. I think it's pretty similar to Judo...

You should be able to tell within the first few lessons whether you like a martial art or not. Martial arts are very much to do with your personality. Just try out a few clubs (even a few clubs of the same martial art) until you find somewhere that just 'feels right' and just makes you happy by training there regardless of your performance! You will know when you find the right one!
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Bezaberry
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(Original post by Dukeofwembley)
krav maga, or brazilian ju jitsu

idf and israeli police use krav maga

tae kwon do is useless in a street fight

a bjj with 1 year experience can beat masters of tae kwon do!

look



the guys who fight in the video are experts

the israeli one
First vid was pretty interesting actually.
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Classical Liberal
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#9
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Krav Maga and KFM are actually useful for self defense. However they are still pretty ****. The problem with self defense training is that it does not simulate the real world. Sure the techniques work in the dojo. However when it comes to the real thing, you will just freeze under the pressure and forget what you learnt.

IF you really want to learn self defense, you actually have to get into real fights where the other person is actually trying to **** you up. Rather than learning a dance, which is what most martial arts actually are.
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Anazoth
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(Original post by Classical Liberal)
Rather than learning a dance, which is what most martial arts actually are.
I disagree, sure some of them are flashy but they help improve a lot of key elements including confidence and reflex. Getting into random fights wont help too much as most people have different fighting styles
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tytyguan
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I learnt a little martial art for self defense from my roommate, but cannot remember any.. thinking of reviewing some when I meet him again.

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alexs2602
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That's the thing with martial arts, it really depends what you want from it. As you can tell a lot of people will argue the effectiveness of a martial art as a means of self defence. Some martial arts are more sports in that you need to perfect technique, spar against someone using the same techniques and the like and you could argue that if you want to defend yourself they're not as suitable towards that end because they play according to strict rules and don't always cater to the idea of someone grabbing you or whatever else goes against the norm in sparring. However, it does depend on the dojo, style, martial art so it's certainly not simple. Then there are martial arts that employ techniques such as grappling, grabs etc which are more useful in self defence. I think there are 4 main aspects to a martial art; sport, self defence, fitness, fun. If self defence isn't so much of an issue you can still fight, practise a sport, get fit and have fun.

One specific I will go into is taekwondo. It's pretty much only kicking as far as I know and for a beginner that can be a bit off-putting. I've done a little karate recently which involves kicking but not as much and I can do front kicks easily; being 5'10 I can kick people in the chin or head who stand about 6'2 tall. However, switch to a roundhouse kick and it can be a lot more difficult on the hips to even get above midway up the torso, the stretching involved is no walk in the park. And then there are axe kicks, back kicks etc. If you're not put off then fine but just be aware you may have to be persistant when trying to make progress.
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Classical Liberal
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(Original post by Anazoth)
I disagree, sure some of them are flashy but they help improve a lot of key elements including confidence and reflex. Getting into random fights wont help too much as most people have different fighting styles
Actually no, humans have pretty predictable fighting strategies when exposed to pressure situations. Even world champion boxers will end up fighting like a 16 year old once taken out of their natural environment.

And martial arts improve arrogance, they make you feel safer, but really are not. And most of them do not improve reflexes because they do not train reflex movements for the most part.
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Daviant
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(Original post by Classical Liberal)
Actually no, humans have pretty predictable fighting strategies when exposed to pressure situations. Even world champion boxers will end up fighting like a 16 year old once taken out of their natural environment.

And martial arts improve arrogance, they make you feel safer, but really are not. And most of them do not improve reflexes because they do not train reflex movements for the most part.
You can train yourself to fight. It's stupid to think otherwise.
Humans are naturally terrifed of falling, but you can overcome those instincts and jump out of a plane with a parachute.
A trained fighter is going to be 10x better than an untrained opponent.
You seriously don't think a world champion boxer could take on basically any opponent, even if they had the same strength and power?
You really think Muhammad Ali or Mike Tyson would ever lose a street fight?
Some styles that do not emphasize sparring will not be useful in a real life situation, but most are.

(Original post by Mad Cat Lady)
Hi not sure if this is the right place but I thought people here might be knowledgeable about this!

Basically I'm the most unfit, uncoordinated and unsporty person ever (mainly because I've always been laughed at for being bad at sport even when I was skinny, and thus I've grown a healthy hatred of it, NOT because of lack of effort), but I really want to learn to defend myself because I often have to walk alone in the dark in dodgy areas.

Can someone recommend me the best martial art for self-defence for someone like me? I've never done a martial art before!

Ta
OP I would recommend you start with boxing - it is effective, places a high emphasis on physical conditoning, you spar A LOT and it is very easy to find a good club.
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Classical Liberal
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(Original post by Daviant)
You can train yourself to fight. It's stupid to think otherwise.
Yes, but I am saying that to really train for self defense, you actually have to have real fights.

Humans are naturally terrifed of falling, but you can overcome those instincts and jump out of a plane with a parachute.
Yes but in fights it is lightening quick instinctive reactions at work. Rather than rationally convincing yourself that it is safe to jump out of a plane.

A simple example is suppose I was to grab your nipples and twist really ****ing hard. The best response is ofcourse to hit me in the face as I will have lowered my guard to grab your nipples. However everybody in this situation will try and get my hands off their nipples. It is just like putting your hand on a hot plate. It is all down to natural instincts.

A trained fighter is going to be 10x better than an untrained opponent.
You seriously don't think a world champion boxer could take on basically any opponent, even if they had the same strength and power?
The untrained fighting might just bite the boxer, or smack him in the balls. Sure the boxer will be better, but don't think that boxing is that similar to a real real fight.

You really think Muhammad Ali or Mike Tyson would ever lose a street fight?
Some styles that do not emphasize sparring will not be useful in a real life situation, but most are.
No, I am saying they would end up doing the same things that everybody else does. You see it when they have fights at their weigh ins, they lose their technique and end up brawling like drunks at a pub.
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danny111
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(Original post by Dukeofwembley)
krav maga, or brazilian ju jitsu

idf and israeli police use krav maga

tae kwon do is useless in a street fight

a bjj with 1 year experience can beat masters of tae kwon do!

look


the guys who fight in the video are experts
BJJ is useless in a street fight

you dont have the time to to take one guy to the ground. you need to fend of several attackers and then get the **** out of there. incapacitate a few guys to make yourself an exit route. not get tangled on the ground...

the only way BJJ will be useful is if you don't do it the way it's meant to be done in a dojo fight, i.e. on the ground. if someone comes at you, dont wrestle him to the ground but use his momentum to get him to the ground and move on quickly. but how many people do you think will do that when most they do in the dojo is the wrestling, when they see videos like that you posted seeing some guy own everybody by bringing him to the floor.
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Abstract1234
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(Original post by ~*starlight*conquest*~)
Self Defense & Attack: Defending yourself is great if you think you can out-run your opponent after taking them to the floor/releasing yourself from their clutch, but if you are against more than one person, or your attacker is faster than you, or too persistent, or there is nowhere to run to, then you'll want to learn to attack as well. Karate is probably the best all-round for attack and defense, but it tends to be a very strict and rigid martial art. Taekwondo is very similar to Karate but focuses on kicking attacks a little more, and is regarded a bit more as a sport rather than a martial art (it's more light-hearted and flexible in its movements). Muay Thai uses elbows and knees to attack, but you'll need to fight at close range, and I don't know whether it teaches much in self-defense techniques other than shielding your body from attacks. I don't know much about Kickboxing, but I imagine it's pretty similar to Muay Thai.

Forgive me if im mistaken but does Taekwondo ever use hand to hand combat apart from blocking? Although I must admit I am a fan of the "tornado kicks".

(Original post by Dukeofwembley)
krav maga, or brazilian ju jitsu

idf and israeli police use krav maga

tae kwon do is useless in a street fight

a bjj with 1 year experience can beat masters of tae kwon do!
Isnt brazilian ju jitsu just dancing mixed with fighting?

(Original post by Classical Liberal)
Actually no, humans have pretty predictable fighting strategies when exposed to pressure situations. Even world champion boxers will end up fighting like a 16 year old once taken out of their natural environment.

And martial arts improve arrogance, they make you feel safer, but really are not. And most of them do not improve reflexes because they do not train reflex movements for the most part.
I've been told (not sure if its true) that the brain "shuts down" after 3 hits. Hence in reality in a hand to hand combat situation you defend yourself then run away. Either way with the amount of weapons that are used these days, training will make little or no difference.
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Classical Liberal
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(Original post by Abstract1234)
I've been told (not sure if its true) that the brain "shuts down" after 3 hits. Hence in reality in a hand to hand combat situation you defend yourself then run away. Either way with the amount of weapons that are used these days, training will make little or no difference.
3 decent strikes to the head, yep, I think after that most people are going to be pretty screwed.

And yep, if your opponent has a knife or something, you are totally ****ed. I don't care how many disarms you have done in training. You will, when faced with a weapon designed to kill, mess it up. And with the knife all it takes is one cut and you out of it or potentially dead.

I have done knife training, and the main thing I learnt, is that knife training is pointless for self defense. In fact the instructor said as much.

The money people spend on self defense is far more than what they are likely to lose getting mugged. Which is what makes the whole thing so pointless.

If you really want to defend yourself, I recommend a gun.
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Darth Stewie
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If it's solely for self defense don't bother, practicing in a gym against opponents who don't actually want to hurt you is nothing like being attacked on the street. Honestly you would be better off doing some sprinting and gymnastics training. Best way to survive a street fight is to avoid it completely and get away from a confrontation as fast as possible, if you can move quickly that will help to no end.

Martial arts are good exercise and a fantastic hobby however realistically they won't help you that much if you ever are attacked especially if its more than one person and/or they are armed.
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Albino
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Krav maga is a wicked one to learn, its basically built around self defence circumstances eg; what would you do if someone came at you with a knife ect. Helpful and quite easy to learn
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