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Best martial art for beginners? Watch

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    (Original post by Abstract1234)
    Forgive me if im mistaken but does Taekwondo ever use hand to hand combat apart from blocking? Although I must admit I am a fan of the "tornado kicks".



    Isnt brazilian ju jitsu just dancing mixed with fighting?



    I've been told (not sure if its true) that the brain "shuts down" after 3 hits. Hence in reality in a hand to hand combat situation you defend yourself then run away. Either way with the amount of weapons that are used these days, training will make little or no difference.
    the same way that karate is cutting up fish



    btw, SHOCKING NEWS: scientists have just discovered a mythical box that can answer any answer you throw at it, some scientists have said it will revolutionize the way we behave ie not asking blatantly obvious questions on a certain room full of students .

    They christened it "Google"

    /sarcasm
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    Muay Thai. Learn to fight with all your limbs which covers long, mid and short ranges. Best for a street fight. Combined with training in judo, jujitsu or bjj you're an extremely well rounded fighter. One elbow or roundhouse kick or well placed knee can end a fight. Opponent grabs you? You learn clitch fighting so you'll be able to gain the upper hand and counter.
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    (Original post by danny111)
    BJJ is useless in a street fight

    you dont have the time to to take one guy to the ground. you need to fend of several attackers and then get the **** out of there. incapacitate a few guys to make yourself an exit route. not get tangled on the ground...

    the only way BJJ will be useful is if you don't do it the way it's meant to be done in a dojo fight, i.e. on the ground. if someone comes at you, dont wrestle him to the ground but use his momentum to get him to the ground and move on quickly. but how many people do you think will do that when most they do in the dojo is the wrestling, when they see videos like that you posted seeing some guy own everybody by bringing him to the floor.
    Fail; bjj teaches judo throws,

    +holding someone in a neck crank or spine lock

    also, bjj has two styles , comp and self defense

    for knife combat ,carry a 3 inch pen knife with you, learn how to use it
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    (Original post by Dukeofwembley)
    the same way that karate is cutting up fish



    btw, SHOCKING NEWS: scientists have just discovered a mythical box that can answer any answer you throw at it, some scientists have said it will revolutionize the way we behave ie not asking blatantly obvious questions on a certain room full of students .

    They christened it "Google"

    /sarcasm
    Fantastic, do explain how this dancing will help to defend yourself..

    (Original post by Dukeofwembley)
    Fail; bjj teaches judo throws,

    +holding someone in a neck crank or spine lock

    also, bjj has two styles , comp and self defense

    for knife combat ,carry a 3 inch pen knife with you, learn how to use it
    I hardly think you will have time to get someone in a lock when defending yourself.

    3 inch pen, dont make me laugh.
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    (Original post by Classical Liberal)
    Yes, but I am saying that to really train for self defense, you actually have to have real fights.



    Yes but in fights it is lightening quick instinctive reactions at work. Rather than rationally convincing yourself that it is safe to jump out of a plane.

    A simple example is suppose I was to grab your nipples and twist really ****ing hard. The best response is ofcourse to hit me in the face as I will have lowered my guard to grab your nipples. However everybody in this situation will try and get my hands off their nipples. It is just like putting your hand on a hot plate. It is all down to natural instincts.



    The untrained fighting might just bite the boxer, or smack him in the balls. Sure the boxer will be better, but don't think that boxing is that similar to a real real fight.



    No, I am saying they would end up doing the same things that everybody else does. You see it when they have fights at their weigh ins, they lose their technique and end up brawling like drunks at a pub.
    If someone grabbed my nipple, I would punch out of reflex. It's happened before.
    Sparring properly gets you used to being hit and how to hit.
    Sparring drills get you used to movement, dodging/blocking punches and stops you flinching at fast movements.
    Sure in a real fight you will lose some technique, but a lot of it will stay with you and give you a huge advantage.
    You don't think boxers in the ring have adrenaline flooding through them? You don't think that is a real fight?
    Learning to fight is a huge advantage.
    It's like:
    Aggression>Experience/skill>Strength/Power>Reach>Raw size>Maneuverability/foot speed
    In a real fight, in my opinion.
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    (Original post by Anazoth)
    I disagree, sure some of them are flashy but they help improve a lot of key elements including confidence and reflex. Getting into random fights wont help too much as most people have different fighting styles

    quite the opposite, in fact. practising against people with different styles is challenging, and a lot more realistic (and usefull) than always practising against someone using the same style as you
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    (Original post by Mad Cat Lady)
    Hi not sure if this is the right place but I thought people here might be knowledgeable about this!

    Basically I'm the most unfit, uncoordinated and unsporty person ever (mainly because I've always been laughed at for being bad at sport even when I was skinny, and thus I've grown a healthy hatred of it, NOT because of lack of effort), but I really want to learn to defend myself because I often have to walk alone in the dark in dodgy areas.

    Can someone recommend me the best martial art for self-defence for someone like me? I've never done a martial art before!

    Ta
    I recommend judo and muay thai. Judo is good when they get close, so you can throw the person down and hold them down. Muay thai is almost like kickboxing. The difference is muay thai makes use of the knees, shins and elbows aswell as your feet and hands. Judo is more about balance, and technique. If you get the technique right almost no strength is needed. Muay thai is about being quick and putting power into your kicks and punches.

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    (Original post by Abstract1234)
    Forgive me if im mistaken but does Taekwondo ever use hand to hand combat apart from blocking? Although I must admit I am a fan of the "tornado kicks".

    I've been told (not sure if its true) that the brain "shuts down" after 3 hits. Hence in reality in a hand to hand combat situation you defend yourself then run away. Either way with the amount of weapons that are used these days, training will make little or no difference.
    I assume you're basing that information on WTF (olympic-style) competitions you've watched. In WTF-sparring, punches rarely score because it's hard to tell how much force you're putting into a punch and corner judges often can't see them because of limbs being in the way. You would need to punch hard enough to wind or knock back your opponent for it to score, and this is a big risk to take as punching with that much force can arguably be slower and leave you more vulnerable than kicking. Because it scores rarely, you don't see it much in WTF-style competition and if you do it's more of a 'filler' punch to distract your opponent.

    ITF-style taekwondo allows punches to the face, and is semi-contact so punches score much better. But the reality is that people who do taekwondo just LOVE to kick. We can't help it, it's just great fun And if we can show off with a flashy spinning kick then even better!

    But, that is competition fighting. In class, we practice punching, blocking and locks and throws, and each club/instructor will have his or her preferences which he/she will teach more often. This will be true of all martial arts.

    Although it may seem like all our stances and rules would make what we learn useless in a street fight, that's not entirely true. Yes, we would drop 90% of what we learnt in the dojang, but the essentials will remain. Repetition of movements during line work and patterns is subconsciously drilled into your mind, so that if a life-or-death situation occurs, if you have trained hard or long enough, your cerebellum which has been registering all your body's memories will take what it can and translate it into a reflex. You might not do a perfect block in a standard stance, but you will be able to do something, whereas without martial art or fighting experience, you will be able to do nothing except shield your face and hope they stop.

    No one should do a martial art and expect that after a couple of years' training they could take on someone with a knife or a gun; even +6th dan martial arts instructors wouldn't gamble their lives on that. If they don't have any other choice though, they would have a better chance of survival than someone who hadn't trained.

    Also, street fighting isn't necessarily the best way to learn. It's like saying 'I want to know how to lose weight in case I get fat. So I'll get fat and then exercise lots and see if Oget good at losing weight'. That's just stupid. Your aim in life should be not to get into a fight in the first place! And if you start purposely getting into street fights then you'll only be making yourself known to the local criminals and that's just asking for trouble!

    I don't think there is a 'best' martial art out there, but it is wrong to say that martial arts are useless in a street fight :P

    Cat lady, just see what classes are near you, try a few different things and see what you like Every martial art has its good points and its weaknesses. You won't get good straight away, so you might as well find something you'll enjoy doing long-term!

    Rant over xD
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    (Original post by Classical Liberal)
    However when it comes to the real thing, you will just freeze under the pressure and forget what you learnt.
    Not if you've done enough adequate pressure testing.
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    (Original post by Mad Cat Lady)
    Basically I'm the most unfit, uncoordinated and unsporty person ever...
    IMHO this is what you need to address first. Violence is an intensely physical affair and if you're in as poor a condition as you make out, you'll just crumble under pressure. All the debate on whether all the techniques carry over to the street are less relevant at this point.

    Pick the most physically demanding class you can find and go from there. It may be boxing, it may be Taekwondo (check out the Australian Bren Foster if you don't think this can be possible), it may be a traditional style of karate or kung fu. Get stronger, get fitter, and learn to give and take a knock. Worry about whether wristlock A will work in scenario B afterwards.
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    (Original post by ~*starlight*conquest*~)
    The best martial art for you will depend on your personality, and what you want out of it.

    Self Defense ONLY: Go for Judo or Ju-jitsu. Judo will teach you how to use other people's own body weight against them to throw or grapple them to the floor. Ju-jitsu focuses more on grabs and locks to immobilise your attacker. If you are particularly light or petite, perhaps Ju-jitsu would be better.

    Self Defense & Attack: Defending yourself is great if you think you can out-run your opponent after taking them to the floor/releasing yourself from their clutch, but if you are against more than one person, or your attacker is faster than you, or too persistent, or there is nowhere to run to, then you'll want to learn to attack as well. Karate is probably the best all-round for attack and defense, but it tends to be a very strict and rigid martial art. Taekwondo is very similar to Karate but focuses on kicking attacks a little more, and is regarded a bit more as a sport rather than a martial art (it's more light-hearted and flexible in its movements). Muay Thai uses elbows and knees to attack, but you'll need to fight at close range, and I don't know whether it teaches much in self-defense techniques other than shielding your body from attacks. I don't know much about Kickboxing, but I imagine it's pretty similar to Muay Thai.

    If you have the time, why not combine, say, Ju-Jitsu and Taekwondo, and learn the best of both worlds that way? (Slight bias here as I'm a Taekwondo fanatic .

    Go to a few classes of different types of martial arts around you. Watch the other students and see how good or confident they are. It will give you an idea of how good the teaching is. You can't fit every aspect of a martial art into one class though, so go to a few in a row and see if they try different things. The more often they train, the better. If you can find a class that trains more than twice a week, then maybe go for that one; you'll progress a LOT faster.

    Hope this helped
    No. Grappling is all very well and good in a cage or on the mat when it's one v one. But in the street you don't have the time to be rolling around on the floor with your attacker when he might have friends.

    Besides, it's all about the teacher and the student, not the art. Go to a few classes, talk to the students.

    Krav Maga is generally a very good art for self defence and the one I would recommend.

    (Original post by Rainingshame)
    In reality for a martial to truly help you it is going to take time for you to learn, become strong and fast enough to pull of and have practised the moves. The person above said Wing Chun and although this probably would help you the most the amount of time for it to become fully effective is around 5-10 years from what I've heard. I'd say Kick boxing would be your best bet and thai kick boxing which is supposed to be rougher would probably be even better. Mix that in with some judo and you should be ven better. Even then expect some time (~1 year until you see some effect and up to 5 or 6 before you start to master it) before it'll help you considerably. My advice until then would be to avoid dodgy alleyways and to carry pepper spray on you. Just run and then pepper spray them in the eyes if they catch up. In 5 years time you'll probably be able to kick them after for good measure.
    Carrying pepper spray is ILLEGAL.
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    (Original post by JohnC2211)
    No. Grappling is all very well and good in a cage or on the mat when it's one v one. But in the street you don't have the time to be rolling around on the floor with your attacker when he might have friends.

    Besides, it's all about the teacher and the student, not the art. Go to a few classes, talk to the students.

    Krav Maga is generally a very good art for self defence and the one I would recommend.



    Carrying pepper spray is ILLEGAL.
    Is it? Never knew that. Thanks for the Heads Up.
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    (Original post by SEHughes)
    Not if you've done enough adequate pressure testing.
    Like I said, a real fight.

    And no, boxing matches with rules and refs and a person who will stop do not count.
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    Ok so here goes:

    First and foremost: you need to learn to strike, and deal with a relentless opponent in a pressure situation. Muay Thai is the top choice, it is the most complete STRIKING Style, just YouTube some maui Thai fights. It teaches you to stand your ground, block, counter and evade strikes, and comprehensively deals with up close striking Failing that a good style of kick boxing will suffice (one with low kicks and not too much emphasis on flashy ****). Kyo Kushan karate is also good failing the previous two,

    You will learn key things which will help you win- Judging distance, timing, blocking, moving, and reading incoming strikes, and reacting accordingly, and this is done in a live/ competitive environment.

    Forget tae Kwon do, it's for kids and lanky people, tippy tippy kicks used for point scoring. You will not learn to deal with close up striking, and you will learn flashy moves that look great, but you will not be able to execute in a street situation, due to clothing/ surroundings/ limited space. Also, one major rule in fighting is to never turn your back to opponent, tae Kwon do does that constantly with its kicks.

    Heres an example, a Thai fighter against a high ranking tae Kwan do guy, kicks only. Says it all, imagine if he used his fists, knees and elbows too.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VL5Cy...e_gdata_player


    Grappling: devoting loads of time to bjj or submissin wrestling is not the best idea, as their application is limited in a street fight, however fights often end up on the ground so you do Need SOME knowledge of the ground game. So you can defend against take downs, get out of a ground situations quickly. So doing some bjj or wrestling on the side is useful. The ground fighting taught in MMA clubs is good, as they teach grappling while being mindful of the fact that your opponent will be striking.


    self defence styles i.e. krav and japanese jiu jitsu, these are great for defending yourself against common untrained fighters and drunk louts and common hooligans. However, you don't have much chance using the stuff they teach against a proficient kick boxer or any other trained fighter.

    Even though these sport or competition based martial arts don't explicitly teach dirty self defence tricks, doesn't take much adjustment for a trained fighter to strike in the eye/throat/balls and trust me, he will anticipate you trying to do the same!!!!

    Also special note for uni students: avoid TJF or the the jitsu foundation, they infest every uni and teach their absolutely dire dire martial art, where u practise everything from a predictable one step punch, no resistance, no interaction with live opponents. They prey on naive freshers, by showing them choreographed demonstrations. It is irresponsible for them to teach what they teach as if someone used what tjf teach, they would probably get themselves in alot of danger. also the way they operate is like a cult and heaven forbid you should question their great one size fits all teachings!

    So bottom line, do mauy Thai, kick boxing or a good karate style. Once your are getting to grips with it, after say six months or so, start dabbling with some ground fighting once a week. Then once you are good in the aforementioned styles, sign up to some krav maga or self defence seminars to learn some dirty tricks.

    As for mma, I see that as a mixture of many styles. However joining an mma club is not a bad alternative to what I recommended above. They have a jack of all trades approach to martial arts, and will train you to fight.

    Also, nothing compares to a real fight, but competition styles do best prepare you for dealing with an actual fight, and is hugely advantageous over no experience!! Also your opponents will be of a much lower caliber than those you train with at a kickboxing club! You also don't need to **** up your head by sparring heavy, you can learn 99% of it with light technical sparring, and when you do go heavy wear a headguard, and fight people you trust, not some random weirdo, who might just want to hurt you, and go home and brag to his mates. As you progress, this becomes less of an issue!


    Hope that helps.

    Want more info, go to bullshido.com where they expose crap styles and schools for what they are!


    Experience:

    5 years mauy Thai ( 2008- present)

    3 years self defence jiu jitsu.

    4 and half years karate as a junior, with a lot of semi and light contact competition.





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    I think what most of you are forgetting is that competition fighters, in all disciplines, as people keep bringing them up, are generally extremely physically fit, they're strong, and for the most part will know how to swing a punch better than your run of the mill drunken knob. The fancy kicks and counters may go out of the window but their fitness and strength will not. So using comparisons of Mike Tyson and Bren Foster are ridiculous. We're talking run of the mill Joe Schmo, who is learning to defend himself against a Biff in the street.
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    Bezaberry is right, and Any trained fighter can beat a drunken nob or biff on the street, it shouldn't be a problem for most of them. So your best bet, get learning a competitive style, get half decent, and the local louts won't be too much of a problem if they bother you. There are no quick fixes, and getting proficient and effective at any martial art takes a lot of time, and practise. If u want a quick fix, do a Krav maga crash course or something.

    However beza is wrong about Physical fitness, its the icing on the cake, and is one element of it, people who train in competitive styles have sharper instincts, can spot opportunities sooner, can avoid hits better etc... And will outsmart you with something simple. Technique and speed is what wins an encounter.

    Practice makes perfect.
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    (Original post by JohnC2211)
    No. Grappling is all very well and good in a cage or on the mat when it's one v one. But in the street you don't have the time to be rolling around on the floor with your attacker when he might have friends.
    and if an attacker or his buddies ever tackles you to the ground, you'd wish you learnt how to grapple

    and most idiots on the 'street' (you must live in a **** hole) will tackle you to the ground, or try some retarded headlock
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    (Original post by Table dust)
    and if an attacker or his buddies ever tackles you to the ground, you'd wish you learnt how to grapple

    and most idiots on the 'street' (you must live in a **** hole) will tackle you to the ground, or try some retarded headlock
    I know how to grapple perfectly well, thank you.

    But you can be the best ground guy in the world, if a guy gets you on the floor with his friends, you're going to stand a slim chance.

    I still maintain that if you can find a good Krav Maga school that would be the best training possible as it encompasses grappling as well as striking.
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    You are better off practising krav after practising some competitive martial arts. The level of striking in kickboxing is a lot higher than in krav, and there is no way you could stand your ground with them, same with grappling. In competitive martial arts you have to deal with resisting opponents who want to beat you, outsmart you and counter you intelligently. Good practice for a real situation.

    Krav is basic stuff done at high speed and pressure, which is good, but there is no live or dynamic resistance from your opponent. Landing a punch on someone who knows how to move and defend, is much harder than against a semi compliant training partner.

    Pick one from each row, you will be fairly complete as a fighter, and you will feel comfortable in both striking and grappling.

    1) Thai, kick boxing, karate

    2)judo, submission wrestling, bjj

    John, if u are taken to the ground, grappling skill combined with dirty striking is essential to escape and get back on your feet. Also grappling skills are useful defence against rape for women, which I believe the original poster is!
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    (Original post by Classical Liberal)
    Like I said, a real fight.

    And no, boxing matches with rules and refs and a person who will stop do not count.
    What are you trained in?
 
 
 
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