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Why 3 years if you can finish it in 1?!?!?! Watch

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    Hi all,

    Just would appreciate some feedback on this and if I feel alone on this subject. I quit uni after my first term and now work in corporate sales (offer came in partly why I quit but the main reason I have sited below).

    I am though researching going back into it...

    I found my course subjects not so much boring...just the pace it was being delivered very frustrating...10 hours contact time a week with more often than not that being "research time in the library." The first written modules took me (2500 words each and a presentation) probably a grand total of 8 hours to prepare (one working day) and I received a 1st overall on these.

    I was fine with the social life as well but to be honest began to question why I needed to be hear for 3 years - especially when the first year didn't count. I went to see my academic adviser and said I basically want to get this over and done with and can I fast track into 2 or preferably 1 year? At the very least take the rest of this year out and come back when the coursework actually counts towards the mark. Apparently I wouldn't be able to cope and who am I, a fresher to say how long courses should be?

    I don't see why I shouldn't, as the student be able to put 3 years into 1 instead of wasting a further two years of my life just to (and afraid I see it this way) make lecturers and uni staff feel they are needed for 3 years.

    If I wanted to I could take an A-Level course in June - up to me what I revise - I can do AS module and A2 Module exams together...no classes need to be attended and I can take it...provided I sit a June Examination...6 months away!

    If I wanted to I could book to take a driving test next week if I felt ready to get that "qualification"...and ok if I failed horribly I'd be the first to say - you know what I was wrong I need to stretch this out over 3-4 months before the crux...but the option is there if I feel I can achieve this in my own time.

    Its probably not a fair comparison but it is how I feel...
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    First year (especially first semester) is a very, very gentle introduction to your degree. There is a lot more work to be done in second and third years, so whilst you may feel that you are able to do more in first year, I guarantee that you would not be feeling that way in second / third year.
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    Thanks for your response...that may have been the case I did speak to second year/third years though and they said it was slightly heavier but still a bit of a long-drawn out process. I didn't expect my opionion to be popular. After all many students don't object to something taking 3 years when it could be finish in 1 as they want to "kill" those 3 years.

    I though wanted to crack on and finish asap and get out in the working world.

    Only researching atm but it is frustrating courses demanding 3 year commitment when from what I understood - the course at its peak was 15-20 hours a week work from a third year.
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    It's a fair point to an extent, I think it can depend on the course you're doing (some courses have very low contact time of as little as 4 hours a week, whereas something like medicine or chemistry, for example, would be pretty difficult to fit into a year) and whether you actually want to learn in-depth, or just learn enough to pass your exams and turn in good essays. As long as you know what you need to put into an essay to achieve a specific grade, some people find it very easy to tick the required boxes for a first without really putting in much effort. Even in second or third year, although the workload does increase, it's still possible on some courses to do the work without truly learning as much about the topic as I think people should have to.

    The trend in education is (and has been for a while) going towards obtaining a grade rather than actual learning. I think if someone wants to truly learn about something and is on a low-contact course, they do need to supplement their contact time with a lot of extra studying because lectures tend to be introductions to the topic, not heavy analysis.

    For that reason, uni will often seem 'slow' to those fortunate few who can turn in a first without the extra reading. It'll depend whether you're going solely to have the piece of paper saying you have a degree, or if you want to learn enough about the topic to make use of that knowledge academically.

    I do think it'd be possible to 'finish' many 3-year degrees in single year, but I wouldn't like to see it myself, because (regardless of your degree classification), someone leaving university is supposed to have in-depth academic knowledge of their subject rather than simply the ability to write essays efficiently, and to obtain that, pretty much anyone will need at least three years.
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    (Original post by Bules676)
    Thanks for your response...that may have been the case I did speak to second year/third years though and they said it was slightly heavier but still a bit of a long-drawn out process. I didn't expect my opionion to be popular. After all many students don't object to something taking 3 years when it could be finish in 1 as they want to "kill" those 3 years.

    I though wanted to crack on and finish asap and get out in the working world.

    Only researching atm but it is frustrating courses demanding 3 year commitment when from what I understood - the course at its peak was 15-20 hours a week work from a third year.

    hmm it would be abit full on but youve got a good point
    this never occured to me until I heard about intercelated degrees ( a 2nd degree studied in one year instead of three, between the degree you're already studying) unless this only applies to medicine
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    (Original post by Bules676)
    ...
    Yer totally get your point. Was quite shocked about the 'school-like' system when I came here. I mean I wanted to do an extra course because I found it interesting but the wouldn't let me :rolleyes:

    In Austria, where I am from, you just have certain courses / credits you have to do but can basically do as many of them per term as you like. My sister, for example, is doing like 2 or 3 more than all her course-mates and working alongside. On the other hand there is a guy who took 14 years to finish his degree. So pretty flexible.
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    In theory, the reason for university is not to obtain a grade, but to develop as a person. Obviously, the grade would show that you were successful, but, say you were doing classics, the idea would be to immerse yourself in ancient history, and build a background to draw on in the future, to make yourself deeper and more thoughtful all round. It should also develop discipline and problem solving skills. Things like this take time, and it's why employers value them - some places simply require 'a degree' for a graduate job, even if it's archaeology to work in a bank (true case).

    Clearly, the above experience is a luxury, but we are priveliged to live in a society where the government pays for everyone to have that luxury, so there is no shame in taking full advantage of it if you give back later (or earlier in your case).

    It sounds like you would benefit from applying to a better university. You certainly can't do what you say you did at Oxbridge (and if you can then please become an academic, because society needs you ), so there must be universities where you would feel challenged, and your first would be worth marginally more.

    However, if you want a degree simply for the sake of a qualification, which I do understand, I don't think there are many places that would let you fast track, for the reasons outlined above. Some places do two year courses, but they tend to be less reputable.

    I would advise;
    - Go to a good university.
    - Relax and enjoy it - you're young, and you will have years in the world of work.
    - If you feel unchallenged use the time to do some extra qualifications. You won't have such unparalleled access to resources again.

    Good luck with it, anyway
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    (Original post by Chr0n)
    On the other hand there is a guy who took 14 years to finish his degree. So pretty flexible.
    I think I know the guy you mean
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    I do think it'd be possible to 'finish' many 3-year degrees in single year, but I wouldn't like to see it myself, because (regardless of your degree classification), someone leaving university is supposed to have in-depth academic knowledge of their subject rather than simply the ability to write essays efficiently, and to obtain that, pretty much anyone will need at least three years.
    This is very true...although my course was an English Language course. It was highly irritating that lectures were made up of 5000 words when 500 would have done and I found it borderline laughable that achieved a first with 8-10 hours work. I really apologize if I come across as arrogant and possibly that I feel I'm too intelligent for the course but I was nothing short of shocked with the contact time and that I found online just as good, if not slightly more useful, content than lectures and seminars.

    I maybe in fact make that probably the minority hear (as said many people openly admitted on my course they had signed up just to kill the next 3 years of life and not having to worry about work) but I just generally felt this course was being drawn out so employees at the uni could justify their salaries and the landlords their 3 years of rent.

    It sounds like you would benefit from applying to a better university. You certainly can't do what you say you did at Oxbridge (and if you can then please become an academic, because society needs you ), so there must be universities where you would feel challenged, and your first would be worth marginally more.
    Wasn't Oxbridge but it was a top 10 uni "apparently" in the UK.

    As said I really apologize if this comes across that I feel I'm too good for uni education - not the case...college was great for me...30 hours of lessons a week...stimulating course and class interaction...great and challenging creative pieces of work...in many ways I wish I was back there.

    I fully recognize the value of a degree in today's society but I couldn't justify the pace and intensity of the delivery of my course.

    But hey as said, I'm probably just the lost soul against the tide. Going back to the example and so some can relate it is the equivalent to being told you must do 12 months compulsory practice before you can take your theory test in driving then a further 24 months before you can take your full driving test before graduating with a license...when in reality you should be allowed to gain that license when you feel ready...which is the case.

    Thanks for all the responses so far and I look forward to anymore points of view

    XXX
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    (Original post by Bules676)
    Wasn't Oxbridge but it was a top 10 uni "apparently" in the UK.

    As said I really apologize if this comes across that I feel I'm too good for uni education - not the case...college was great for me...30 hours of lessons a week...stimulating course and class interaction...great and challenging creative pieces of work...in many ways I wish I was back there.
    Not at all! You can't really be arrogant to people you don't know

    Genuinely, if you could get a first easily at a top ten university you must be very bright. That means you'll do well wherever you go, but you ought to have a degree just to recognise the fact that you can. (Of course, the later years may well be more challenging, but there's no way of knowing).

    However, I don't think anywhere would let you do that - perhaps it's to justify academics' jobs, but there is certainly a strong argument against the devaluation of degrees. It will probably come down to a personal choice over whether what you will get out of a degree is worth spending those three years on.
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    Because university is more than just the educational side of things. You're a very different person at the end of university than at the beginning plus you're showing people you can commit to something for three years even if you don't particularly agree with everything that goes on.
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    Genuinely, if you could get a first easily at a top ten university you must be very bright. That means you'll do well wherever you go, but you ought to have a degree just to recognise the fact that you can. (Of course, the later years may well be more challenging, but there's no way of knowing).
    As said from my, admittedly limited research, I was not the only one who "easily" hit the first. I like to think I'm the above average student but I'm by no means exceptional (I wish!)

    Hannah - I know what your saying about commitmitting to something for 3 years and I'd be more than happy to do that if I felt the uni was commitmitting to me for 3 years...I just didn't feel like it was and was rebranding a 6 month process (as of course 1 year of uni is in reality 6 months) into something that needs to take 3 year "experience" - which (and I don't begrudge them this) the average student will take with open arms because it means they don't have to take any job (and therefore in my opionion be under any real obligation/pressure) for 3 years

    I have in the time from posting the OP been looking at starting a new course/open uni but really in the majority - the courses content I'm researching there is no reason (I can see) why I can't stay in Corporate sales - maybe do 2 hours work a night at home and complete any of these in a year. I know uni is should be more than just the degree and the bit of paper but I'm really not bothered about the socialising and growing up part. I have a great social life at work and have grown in my first two months in this new job than I feel I will in 3 years at uni.

    I actually also calculated that the fees for uni per hour where I went actually translate to a shocking £17.75 an hour for the contact time - and that's not 1 vs 1 or even 1 vs 10 in most cases. Its in a big lecture theatre 1 vs 100.

    Again I'm sorry if I'm coming across as arrogant and over-demanding...as said I did one term so I'm by no ways the most qualified to judge.
 
 
 
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