Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Good replacement for squats? Watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Are there any other routines that are as good as squats? My problem is is my knee caps are slightly off centre so that if I do the squatting movement it causes a lot of pain in my knees. In order to rectify the problem I need to strengthen my inner leg muscles to pull my knee caps back into place.
    Any help would be appreciated


    Posted from TSR Mobilek
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks for replying, I start to get the pain after about 4-5 squat motions without any weights which is why I'm wanting to know of a decent alternative in order to build the muscle and correct the problem.


    Posted from TSR Mobilek
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 20z12)
    Get a doctor to check that out for you.about that problem. There are alternatives. But they may also cause pain when you move.
    The doctor sent me to a physio who said it was weak muscles in my inner legs and all I needed to do was strengthen them. I've used a leg press machines before but was told by someone that they were ineffective


    Posted from TSR Mobilek
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Shomberlon)
    The doctor sent me to a physio who said it was weak muscles in my inner legs and all I needed to do was strengthen them. I've used a leg press machines before but was told by someone that they were ineffective


    Posted from TSR Mobilek
    Can you go into a bit more detail than "inner legs"? Thighs, hamstrings?
    The way you've referred to it sounds like hamstrings but better to be sure.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    lunges with dumbells or barbell, bulgarian split squats
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    There aren't really any as good as squats have you tried putting your feet at different angles, that may help. Aside from that, just carry on with other normal leg lifts I guess.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    There is no equivallent to free weighted hip and leg flexion/extension. The only way of doing that is by squatting.

    If you squat high bar and feel knee pain, either of the following may be the cause:

    1. Weight on your toes/heels not grounded
    2. Knees not tracking toes
    3. Most unlikely: forward-pulling force of the quads tug on your patella, aggravating a significant muscular imbalance that's causing your knee caps to be off centre, and more posterior leg emphasis is needed.

    If you squat low bar and feel knee pain, you're either not doing it right or your knees are in much worse condition than you think, and properly performed LB squats will generally treat it since the quadriceps' knee extension force is balanced by the hamstrings' knee flexion force, eventually realigning the patella by sorting out the imbalance. Unless you have something going on with your knee cartilage, squats can only help.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    ^ you have a lot of informative posts!

    I have knee problems and low bar squats are awesome. Your lower back will take more of the force compared to high bar. But you said bodyweight squats give you knee pain?? That sounds bad! Low/high bar won't make a difference in that case. Surely your physio should've given you exercises to strengthen the necessary muscles?? Have they just sent you away.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Shomberlon)
    The doctor sent me to a physio who said it was weak muscles in my inner legs and all I needed to do was strengthen them. I've used a leg press machines before but was told by someone that they were ineffective


    Posted from TSR Mobilek
    It's the physio's job to tell you what exercises to do to sort out the problem surely? That what my physio does when I have a problem...
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Leg press is about as close as you'll get. Squatting is difficult to replace.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks for all the help guys, I think I'll do about 3-4 weeks of leg presses while doing squats without weights to work on my form and then go from there.


    Posted from TSR Mobilek
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I reckon you just need to learn how to squat.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Shomberlon)
    Are there any other routines that are as good as squats? My problem is is my knee caps are slightly off centre so that if I do the squatting movement it causes a lot of pain in my knees. In order to rectify the problem I need to strengthen my inner leg muscles to pull my knee caps back into place.
    Any help would be appreciated


    Posted from TSR Mobilek

    Dude you cant do a diy job on your dodgy knees you need to see a doctor or a very least physio you might need surgery. If your training your hamstrings or quads you could try lunges, maybe even deadlifts. But u need to check with your doctor that this won't damage or strain your knees
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Leg press IMO is a lot worse for knees AND lower back
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fan service)
    There is no equivallent to free weighted hip and leg flexion/extension. The only way of doing that is by squatting.

    If you squat high bar and feel knee pain, either of the following may be the cause:

    1. Weight on your toes/heels not grounded
    2. Knees not tracking toes
    3. Most unlikely: forward-pulling force of the quads tug on your patella, aggravating a significant muscular imbalance that's causing your knee caps to be off centre, and more posterior leg emphasis is needed.

    If you squat low bar and feel knee pain, you're either not doing it right or your knees are in much worse condition than you think, and properly performed LB squats will generally treat it since the quadriceps' knee extension force is balanced by the hamstrings' knee flexion force, eventually realigning the patella by sorting out the imbalance. Unless you have something going on with your knee cartilage, squats can only help.
    #3 I call rubbish. The posterior leg muscles don't act on the patella, quadriceps does. The TS probably has an oddly shaped tibia, which would normally prevent lateral movement of the patella. Hamstrings are irrelevant as they act on the tibia/fibula, and even a fully extended knee has a properly placed patella for stability.

    TS: the kneecap sometimes moves laterally (ie away from your midline) when you have weak quadriceps, because one part of quadriceps, the vastus medialis (this is what your doctor means by the inner leg muscles), pulls it medically (towards midline) to counteract its tendency for lateral deviation. You should do unweighted squats, although only go down as far as you can without pain, and lunges, to strengthen quadriceps and help stabilise it on the knee joint.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Hypocrism)
    The posterior leg muscles don't act on the patella, quadriceps does.
    Yes they do. You're equating the muscles' involvement to their attachments without understanding the consequent kinesiology. That's not helpful.

    http://www.exrx.net/Muscles/Hamstrings.html
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamstring

    See insertion points and articulations.

    The hamstring muscles' tendons wrap around the knee, attaching on both sides of the tibia, at the bottom of the knee (fibula head), and pull on it from below when they get tight.

    In the LBBS, when the hamstrings contract they apply a posterior force to the patella which perfectly counters the anterior shear force applied by the quads. With strong hamstrings, the result is zero shear force on the knee ligaments. The knee is also protected in the LB squat as it isometrically strengthens the hamstring and quad tendons equally. High bar is quad dominant = more hamstring assistance work like RDLs and stiff leg lift variations if you're an OL'er.

    (Original post by Hypocrism)
    The TS probably has an oddly shaped tibia,
    Less likely than a simple muscular imbalance. It's common for athletic teens to have weak posterior chains.

    A fallacious cherry-picked argument from authority for good measure:

    Eccentric quadriceps contraction during landing and the resulting anterior tibial shear force are anterior cruciate ligament injury risk factors, while hamstring contraction limits anterior cruciate ligament loading. Anterior tibial shear force is derived from quadriceps and hamstring co-contraction, and a greater quadriceps/hamstring strength ratio has been associated with heightened lower extremity injury risk. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate relationships between anterior tibial shear force during landing and quadriceps and hamstring strength.
    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...68003308001988

    ----------------------------------------

    TL;DR: never mind
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: January 7, 2013
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Will you be richer or poorer than your parents?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.