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Japanese Envoy Tries to Mend Ties With South Korea Watch

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    (Original post by The New York Times)
    SEOUL, South Korea — Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan reached out to South Korea’s incoming president, Park Geun-hye, on Friday by sending a special envoy to Seoul with calls for mending ties that had become strained under their predecessors.

    But no immediate breakthrough was expected as the two main East Asian allies of the United States exchanged barbs couched in diplomatic language, a reflection of their long-running differences rooted in Japan’s often brutal colonial rule of Korea from 1910 till 1945.

    The Japanese envoy, Fukushiro Nukaga, a lawmaker in the Liberal Democratic Party, met Ms. Park in her Seoul office on Friday, delivering a letter from Mr. Abe and the Japanese leader’s invitation for Ms. Park to visit Tokyo. Mr. Nukaga relayed Mr. Abe’s call for a close cooperative relationship with Ms. Park, hoping that "the launching of new governments in both counties will mark a good starting point in bilateral relations," said Cho Yoon-sun, a spokeswoman for Ms. Park.

    Ms. Park shared a similar wish, calling for more exchanges between the two countries.

    Analysts said the dispatching of the special envoy to Seoul may be a sign that Mr. Abe, now in office, was trying to prevent the worsening of ties between Japan and its neighbors, which have grown increasingly strained over a series of territorial spats.

    During its successful campaign for the Dec. 16 parliamentary election, Mr. Abe’s party eagerly tapped nationalistic emotions stoked by the territorial disputes. And during her own campaign for South Korea’s Dec. 19 presidential election, Ms. Park, like all her predecessors, vowed not to show weakness in the disputes with Japan.

    Despite his conciliatory message, Mr. Nukaga’s trip was overshadowed by simmering tensions. A group of South Korean activists rallied in the Seoul airport in opposition to his visit, and one of them stabbed his belly with a knife to show his anger at what he called Japan’s refusal to repent for its colonial-era brutalities. With blood streaming down his body, the 63-year-old man was taken to hospital. The police said his injury was not serious.

    When Mr. Nakuga’s delegationt met Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan of South Korea later Friday, it protested a South Korean court’s decision on Thursday not to extradite a Chinese man accused of an arson attack at Tokyo’s Yasukuni Shrine for Japan’s war dead, the Foreign Ministry said.

    The man, Liu Qiang, served 10 months in a South Korean prison for a separate arson attack at the Japanese Embassy in Seoul in January last year. Calling Mr. Liu’s Yasukuni December 2011 attack a "political crime," the Seoul court rejected South Korean prosecutors’ attempt to have him extradited to Tokyo. On Friday, the man was allowed to fly home to China, where many nationalistic bloggers treated him like a hero.

    Mr. Abe, a right-wing politician whose nationalist comments had often enraged South Koreans, returned as prime minister after his party’s landslide election victory in December. Ms. Park, a conservative, is to be inaugurated next month.

    Both come to office after their countries’ relations deteriorated over a long-standing dispute over a set of islets. In August, South Korea’s outgoing president, Lee Myung-bak, became the first Korean leader to land on the islets, controlled by South Korea and claimed by Japan.

    Officials here said Mr. Lee’s visit was driven partly by Japan’s refusal to come to terms with Korean and other Asian women who, historians say, were forced or lured into working in military-run brothels for Japan’s World War II soldiers. Mr. Abe and some of the members of his Cabinet had previously angered Koreans and Chinese by suggesting that there was no evidence that Japan’s military forced those women into sexual servitude.

    When she met the Japanese envoy on Friday, Ms. Park emphasized that "reconciliation and cooperation" should be accompanied by a "correct understanding of history."
    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/05/wo...orea.html?_r=0
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    Belarus does not support Japanese moves to influence South Korea.

    India does support the moves for reconciliation and advocates moves of diplomacy from Japan to the Republic of Korea.
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    The Swiss Confederation also supports the move for reconciliation and that both nations benefit from diplomacy.

    The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan hopes that both nations will do what is best for their respective countries. For now, we watch with interest.
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    The US supports these moves and hopes a peaceful and productive solution can be sought from both of our allies.

    OOC: Who represents Japan?
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    (Original post by Kiss)
    OOC: Who represents Japan?
    Mazzini
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    Myanmar welcomes the moves to mend ties between these two states. Any state's future is in international co-operation which we have found out to our benefit and this is a positive step in that direction.
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    Iceland supports the movement toward peace between the two nations.
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      The Russian Federation supports the road to a peaceful coexistence.

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      The Kingdom of Spain echoes all sentiments of peace between the two countries
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      The Netherlands is supportive of any acts such as this and hopes that the two countries will indeed be able to mend relations.


      This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad Ap
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      Malaysia supports this act of diplomacy between the two nations, but watches on at peace talks progress.
     
     
     
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