TemplarPage
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Hi,

So I have recently decided to pursue a masters degree in aerospace engineering after getting a bachelors degree in some other sort of engineering. My goal is to become an aerospace engineer (One who works on spacecrafts, not air crafts) and I was wondering which branch of engineering would be most helpful to study at bachelor level. I have heard that mechanical engineering is the most helpful but I am unsure...

Summary:
Is a bachelors degree in mechanical engineering the best path to getting a masters in aerospace engineering? My university of choice does not offer aerospace engineering at bachelors degree level.

Thanks in advance.
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SillyEddy
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BEng Mechanical Engineering -> MSc Aerospace Engineering is the route I'm actually going on (I'm in the first year, but hey, it's a plan, right?)

You'll have to check entry requirements to be entirely sure, but every university offering MSc Aerospace seems to be willing to accept BEng/BSc Mech Eng. It's basically the same sort of engineering, so it will qualify you to study that Master's degree.


Mech Eng is a broader, but not too broad, sort of engineering. The first 2 years of Mech and Aero would probably be the same, and there would only be minor differences in the third year. Mech Eng will probably be the best route as you will gain the most experience in a variety of fields, then you can specialise in Aerospace afterwards. The courses are otherwise pretty much identical with most universities. You might get a few more aerospace tailored projects if you did find BEng Aero, but I've done an aerospace report already with Mech.



One thing to be aware of, though: Not all the MScs are accredited, and this affects more than just BEng/MSc, but just check that the university is properly accredited. Someone like "IMechE" will be perfect. That way, you'll be able to become a chartered engineer in the future with the least hassle. It's possible to become chartered in other ways, but it might mean more work from you. You'll probably also be accredited by "RAeS" and "IMechE" for the MSc. I spoke to IMechE and they were happy to accredit me and said I would be able to become chartered with BEng Mech+MSc Aero
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a10
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(Original post by SillyEddy)
BEng Mechanical Engineering -> MSc Aerospace Engineering is the route I'm actually going on (I'm in the first year, but hey, it's a plan, right?)

You'll have to check entry requirements to be entirely sure, but every university offering MSc Aerospace seems to be willing to accept BEng/BSc Mech Eng. It's basically the same sort of engineering, so it will qualify you to study that Master's degree.


Mech Eng is a broader, but not too broad, sort of engineering. The first 2 years of Mech and Aero would probably be the same, and there would only be minor differences in the third year. Mech Eng will probably be the best route as you will gain the most experience in a variety of fields, then you can specialise in Aerospace afterwards. The courses are otherwise pretty much identical with most universities. You might get a few more aerospace tailored projects if you did find BEng Aero, but I've done an aerospace report already with Mech.



One thing to be aware of, though: Not all the MScs are accredited, and this affects more than just BEng/MSc, but just check that the university is properly accredited. Someone like "IMechE" will be perfect. That way, you'll be able to become a chartered engineer in the future with the least hassle. It's possible to become chartered in other ways, but it might mean more work from you. You'll probably also be accredited by "RAeS" and "IMechE" for the MSc. I spoke to IMechE and they were happy to accredit me and said I would be able to become chartered with BEng Mech+MSc Aero
first year Mechanical and first year Aero are almost the same however from second year onwards its different in the sense that on the aero course you'll be doing a lot of aerodynamics and aerostructure design whereas in mechanical you'll be doing stuff like thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, materials and some design modules of course but they will be a bit more broad not just covering aero but covering most discplines(relevant to mechanical) in most cases. But having a mech eng degree is fine as most aero companies that iv seen especially the major ones still employ mechanical engineering graduates.

As for the chartership yeahh you are right but dont forget its not just

MEng = CEng

or:

BEng + MSc = CEng

you have to have few years work experience in industry on top of that at least 3+ years then you can apply for chartered status(CEng).
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TemplarPage
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(Original post by a10)
first year Mechanical and first year Aero are almost the same however from second year onwards its different in the sense that on the aero course you'll be doing a lot of aerodynamics and aerostructure design whereas in mechanical you'll be doing stuff like thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, materials and some design modules of course but they will be a bit more broad not just covering aero but covering most discplines(relevant to mechanical) in most cases. But having a mech eng degree is fine as most aero companies that iv seen especially the major ones still employ mechanical engineering graduates.

As for the chartership yeahh you are right but dont forget its not just

MEng = CEng

or:

BEng + MSc = CEng

you have to have few years work experience in industry on top of that at least 3+ years then you can apply for chartered status(CEng).
The course that I will be taking (which is a mech engineering course) includes 1 year industry
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a10
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(Original post by TemplarPage)
The course that I will be taking (which is a mech engineering course) includes 1 year industry
thats good is it accredited?
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JoRdaN210
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(Original post by a10)
thats good is it accredited?
Hey man just wondering if you could give me some advice, how important is it that the course is accredited? I've applied for Sheffield Hallam Beng Aerospace Engineering and got an offer, it's a fairly low ranked uni and the entry requirements were low so it's my backup.

http://www.shu.ac.uk/prospectus/course/993/

However it doesn't say anything about the course being accredited, on the Meng Aerospace for Hallam it does but the Beng isn't.

Is this a really important thing? Should I forget about a Beng that isn't 'recognized' and pursue a Masters fully? What d'ya reckon, thanks !
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a10
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(Original post by JoRdaN210)
Hey man just wondering if you could give me some advice, how important is it that the course is accredited? I've applied for Sheffield Hallam Beng Aerospace Engineering and got an offer, it's a fairly low ranked uni and the entry requirements were low so it's my backup.

http://www.shu.ac.uk/prospectus/course/993/

However it doesn't say anything about the course being accredited, on the Meng Aerospace for Hallam it does but the Beng isn't.

Is this a really important thing? Should I forget about a Beng that isn't 'recognized' and pursue a Masters fully? What d'ya reckon, thanks !
accreditation is very important in an engineering degree as it will make it easier for you to get industry standard jobs but also it makes getting chartered status later on easier(that is if you are going for MEng or BEng+ Msc) the course you have shown me is accredited i checked on uni stats and most likely if the MEng is accredited by the right engineering board then you are good to go. Please note though since you are doing aerospace it is important you find ones accredited specifically by the RAeS

The fact that the course is accredited wont disadvantage you to people who went to "higher" ranked unis. Rankings don't matter a lot as much as people think employers dont look at universities when they employ you, they look at your CV and if you portray the right skills for the job and have relevant experience you will simply get the job over someone who per say went to the "top 10" unis but didn't have any revelant experience.
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.raiden.
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May I ask is it better to do mechanical engineering, then aerospace engineering? What was the reason for not doing aerospace engineering Bsc at the start? Sorry if this is a stupid question, but I'm applying for aerospace soon and I'm curious
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a10
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(Original post by raiden95)
May I ask is it better to do mechanical engineering, then aerospace engineering? What was the reason for not doing aerospace engineering Bsc at the start? Sorry if this is a stupid question, but I'm applying for aerospace soon and I'm curious
i wanted to do aerospace but the industry is a bit shaky and also i wasnt 100% sure i really liked the aviation industry so instead i opted to do mechanical as its broader and much more opportunities available
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jnkesd
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You are getting a little ahead of yourself. You haven't even started your undergrad and you're already talking about your masters. You are best off to do your undergrad in what you are interested in and then when it comes time to decide on a masters then make that decision. If you want a degree in aerospace engineering then I would recommend you find a university that offers a bachelors in aerospace.
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JoRdaN210
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(Original post by a10)
accreditation is very important in an engineering degree as it will make it easier for you to get industry standard jobs but also it makes getting chartered status later on easier(that is if you are going for MEng or BEng+ Msc) the course you have shown me is accredited i checked on uni stats and most likely if the MEng is accredited by the right engineering board then you are good to go. Please note though since you are doing aerospace it is important you find ones accredited specifically by the RAeS

The fact that the course is accredited wont disadvantage you to people who went to "higher" ranked unis. Rankings don't matter a lot as much as people think employers dont look at universities when they employ you, they look at your CV and if you portray the right skills for the job and have relevant experience you will simply get the job over someone who per say went to the "top 10" unis but didn't have any revelant experience.
Oh right then, that's great then The Meng at this university is "accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology. If you gain an MEng at 2:2 level or above you will satisfy the complete academic requirements for accreditation as a chartered engineer."

So I could do a Beng in Aerospace and then a Meng there, awesome stuff thanks for replying


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a10
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(Original post by JoRdaN210)
Oh right then, that's great then The Meng at this university is "accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology. If you gain an MEng at 2:2 level or above you will satisfy the complete academic requirements for accreditation as a chartered engineer."

So I could do a Beng in Aerospace and then a Meng there, awesome stuff thanks for replying


yeahh i saw thats okay i would have probably found one specific accredited by the RAeS (royal aeronautical society) tho as this will help hugely if u want to work in the aero industry later on as its industry standard stamped by them! For example look at this course

http://courses.uwe.ac.uk/H404/2013

notice the badge at the sides its industry approved by the RAeS and engineering council so its a very good course to do if u want to work directly in todays aero industry. With that one you can probably still work in the industry but it will be hard to adapt to industry standard changes as your course may have not covered some of the aero industry aspects so u may need to learn them even if u become chartered which personally i wouldn't wana waste time learning things again.
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JoRdaN210
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(Original post by a10)
yeahh i saw thats okay i would have probably found one specific accredited by the RAeS (royal aeronautical society) tho as this will help hugely if u want to work in the aero industry later on as its industry standard stamped by them! For example look at this course

http://courses.uwe.ac.uk/H404/2013

notice the badge at the sides its industry approved by the RAeS and engineering council so its a very good course to do if u want to work directly in todays aero industry. With that one you can probably still work in the industry but it will be hard to adapt to industry standard changes as your course may have not covered some of the aero industry aspects so u may need to learn them even if u become chartered which personally i wouldn't wana waste time learning things again.
Hmm I suppose you're right, i'll apply to Bristol through clearing later on then cause i've already got 5 choices.

I don't think it makes too much of a difference who the course is accredited by, obviously it helps for an Aerospace course to be accredited by an Aeronautical institution but the IET is pretty well recognized and completing the course is enough to meet the requirements to go on to be a chartered Engineer, so it's not too much of a big deal. Just as long as it is accredited.
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a10
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(Original post by JoRdaN210)
Hmm I suppose you're right, i'll apply to Bristol through clearing later on then cause i've already got 5 choices.

I don't think it makes too much of a difference who the course is accredited by, obviously it helps for an Aerospace course to be accredited by an Aeronautical institution but the IET is pretty well recognized and completing the course is enough to meet the requirements to go on to be a chartered Engineer, so it's not too much of a big deal. Just as long as it is accredited.
yes but if u are going to work in the aero industry for most of career then it makes sense to get one accredited by the right board as opposed to any. You can still work in other industries for example the car industry... with an aero degree you dnt have to stick to aviation if u dont want to
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united.spammers
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(Original post by TemplarPage)
Hi,

So I have recently decided to pursue a masters degree in aerospace engineering after getting a bachelors degree in some other sort of engineering. My goal is to become an aerospace engineer (One who works on spacecrafts, not air crafts) and I was wondering which branch of engineering would be most helpful to study at bachelor level. I have heard that mechanical engineering is the most helpful but I am unsure...

Summary:
Is a bachelors degree in mechanical engineering the best path to getting a masters in aerospace engineering? My university of choice does not offer aerospace engineering at bachelors degree level.

Thanks in advance.
Mech Eng is a good path to an aerospace MSc but it depends on what you want to focus on during your masters. Electronic or control systems engineering would be equally as vaild a route into aerospace, and possibly even better. You should look at what types of jobs there are that focus on space craft and see what disciplines they prefer.
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united.spammers
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(Original post by a10)
yes but if u are going to work in the aero industry for most of career then it makes sense to get one accredited by the right board as opposed to any. You can still work in other industries for example the car industry... with an aero degree you dnt have to stick to aviation if u dont want to
I don't think it matters what board you're accredited by. In fact, from what people in industry have told me, accreditation isn't even all that important anyway. Apparently a lot of engineers don't bother because employers value work experience much more than they do chartership. Obviously it can't hurt to get accredited but it's not the be all and end all.
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(Original post by TemplarPage)
Hi,

So I have recently decided to pursue a masters degree in aerospace engineering after getting a bachelors degree in some other sort of engineering. My goal is to become an aerospace engineer (One who works on spacecrafts, not air crafts) and I was wondering which branch of engineering would be most helpful to study at bachelor level. I have heard that mechanical engineering is the most helpful but I am unsure...

Summary:
Is a bachelors degree in mechanical engineering the best path to getting a masters in aerospace engineering? My university of choice does not offer aerospace engineering at bachelors degree level.

Thanks in advance.
Why not start with MEng Aero? People here have said that aero/mech eng courses are the same for the first two years; this may be the case at some uni's, but by the end of my second year I'd studied more aerodynamics than my mech eng colleagues had at the end of there degree(who had had still done some pretty advanced stuff). The maths we learnt in year 1 and 2 was also very different; we did a lot more PDE's and linear algebra. Aerospace really has elements of fluid mechanics, structural mechanics and control systems (plus other bits); the undergrad aero courses give you a lot of exposure to each area from the start which makes it a lot easier to decide what you want to focus on later on.

Aero courses vary a lot, in difficulty and what types of things you study; some are very theoretical and some are more geared towards practicalities. It's really important to look at the syllabuses carefully. I thought it would be all about planes but we've barely touched them and spent most of our time doing fundamental fluid mechanics and the underlying theory of FEA & CFD.

Accreditation is pretty important actually, all this about experience being more important is nonsense especially at the start of your career because you don't have any experience. The accreditation firstly ensures that your course is at a standard appropriate to application in industry; a lot of big engineering companies will only take people onto grad schemes from accredited courses. Working towards chartership is a big feature of most grad schemes too because it's a way of showing that you're a competent engineer. Not all MSc's are accredited; also quite a few uni's have dual RAeS & IMechE accreditation for aero courses(which is handy when you're applying to firms outside of aerospace associated more with mech eng, as it shows that the course is still appropriate). I think RAeS & IMechE are looked upon similarly in aerospace don't know about IET and others though; at the end of the day big engineering companies know which Uni's are the best - industrial & research partnerships are a big clue to this.

Also, not sure about how things are with tuition fees now; but when I applied MEng made a lot more financial sense.
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JoRdaN210
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(Original post by united.spammers)
I don't think it matters what board you're accredited by. In fact, from what people in industry have told me, accreditation isn't even all that important anyway. Apparently a lot of engineers don't bother because employers value work experience much more than they do chartership. Obviously it can't hurt to get accredited but it's not the be all and end all.
A very good point, that's why I really want to do a year in industry with my Meng or Beng.
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0le
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Work Experience is something a lot of companies do look for in CV. It isn't vital, but if you can get a degree which involves a year in industry, I'd recommend it.
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DedicatedWizard
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I know this is an old thread but I was wondering if it matters if the Aerospace course you plan to go on is only accredited by IMechE? Is it really essential for it to be accredited by RAeS?
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