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    I was informed before the xmas break that my landlord would be entering the property to check everything was ok whilst me and my flatmates were away. We were also advised to leave lights on to deter burglars.

    I'm overdrawn I have no money to pay for lighting bills when no one is there; so decided to keep the lights off (like any sane person)

    I have since returned to the house to find that the landlord has let himself in and turned the lights on without asking me.. The lights have been on constantly for 3 weeks..

    He expects me to pay for the bill claiming it's his property and he has the right to protect it.. I don't want to pay the bill!

    Any advice??
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    Threaten to take legal action? Or just refuse to pay I guess, if he wants to do that it's his problem not yours


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    The electricity bill will be in your name, not the landlord's. That means that if you don't pay up, then the electricity company will come after you, not the LL.

    In addition, you have no proof, either of the fact that it was the LL who turned the lights on, or how much electricity it has used (even if you had meter readings from when you left and when you returned, other things will use electricity, such as the boiler and things that have been left on.

    Essentially, you're going to have to pay up.

    Count yourself lucky - we came back to find the lights on, the TV on, and the burglar alarm off :angry:
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    pretty annoying but i guess you're right.. the LL did actually tell me he turned the lights on but i couldn't prove how much electricity it used..
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    Well, according to this, standard lightbulbs cost up to eight or nine pence a day to run; and energy saving ones mostly less than a penny. So if he turned on, say, ten lights, for three weeks, it'll have cost somewhere between two and nineteen pounds. Annoying, but not the end of the world.
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    Is a landlord actually allowed to let himself in and do things without your permission? When I was renting, I was told that our LL had to call us if he wanted to come round for a chat or anything, and he always did. Although he had a key for the property he would never have used it, because as long as you're living somewhere you don't want the thought of somebody letting themselves in; you never know what they might catch you doing!
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    But the OP says the landlord gave notice that he's be going into the property ("I was informed before the xmas break that my landlord would be entering the property") so there's no suggestion the landlord entered without giving proper notice.
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    (Original post by xoxAngel_Kxox)
    Is a landlord actually allowed to let himself in and do things without your permission? When I was renting, I was told that our LL had to call us if he wanted to come round for a chat or anything, and he always did. Although he had a key for the property he would never have used it, because as long as you're living somewhere you don't want the thought of somebody letting themselves in; you never know what they might catch you doing!
    They just have to give 24 hours notice, which the OPs landlord did. They don't have to give any notice in the event of an emergency eg flood or gas leak.

    Personally I don't care if my LL goes in and out as and when during the holidays, so long as he gives proper notice when we are there, and locks up properly etc.
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    if he gave 24 hours notice, then he did nothing wrong, obviously he is just stupid
    luckily lights do not cost as much as you think, probably not more than 5 pounds it cost you.
    at most you can maybe make him pay for the electricity charge lol, but even then, not by law.
 
 
 
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