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    (Original post by DJMayes)
    I feel like trolling this by replying with the AM-GM inequality...

    On a side note,  e^{i\pi }+1 = 0 is the most aesthetically pleasing one you will ever get but I'm a big fan of De Moivre's in general. I love how something which is fundamentally to do with complex numbers can be used to solve a lot of things involving no complex numbers whatsoever, such as summing sines and the like.
    No doubt some mathmos would actually go for that monstrosity. I'd be interested to hear Mladenov's favourite equation.

    Indeed, I like the way it's used in physics, whereby a measurable quantity is defined to be complex just so you can use the equation .
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    Well since I prefer the polyhedral Euler formula over the complex one anyday and that's already been said now.
    \displaystyle W =  \int_{k< \Lambda}^{} [Dg][Da][D \psi][D \Phi] e^{\big\{ i \int d^4x\sqrt{-g}  \big\{\frac{m_p^2}{2}R -  \frac{1}{4} F_{\mu  \nu}^a F^{a \mu  \nu} + i \psi^i \gamma^{ \mu} D_{\mu}  \psi^i +( \overline{ \psi}_L^iV_{ij} \Phi  \psi_R^j + h.c.) - |D_\mu  \Phi |^2 - V( \Phi )\big\}\big\}}
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    (Original post by Llewellyn)
    Well since I prefer the polyhedral Euler formula over the complex one anyday and that's already been said now.
    \displaystyle W =  \int_{k< \Lambda}^{} [Dg][Da][D \psi][D \Phi] e^{\big\{ i \int d^4x\sqrt{-g}  \big\{\frac{m_p^2}{2}R -  \frac{1}{4} F_{\mu  \nu}^a F^{a \mu  \nu} + i \psi^i \gamma^{ \mu} D_{\mu}  \psi^i +( \overline{ \psi}_L^iV_{ij} \Phi  \psi_R^j + h.c.) - |D_\mu  \Phi |^2 - V( \Phi )\big\}\big\}}
    Da*** is that. It's even worse than the neutron transport equation!
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    (Original post by bananarama2)
    Out of interest what is everyone's favourite equation ?
    y=mx + c

    Behold its beauty.

    P.S. What is yours? Apologies if I have missed you already saying.
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    (Original post by Dark Lord of Mordor)
    y=mx + c

    Behold its beauty.

    P.S. What is yours? Apologies if I have missed you already saying.
    I can't decide....

    I mean the simplicity of  \Delta S_T \geq 0

    Or the revolutionary nature of \displaystyle \hbar\frac{\partial}{\partial t}\Psi (x, t) = \hat{H}\Psi (x, t)
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    (Original post by bananarama2)
    I can't decide....

    I mean the simplicity of  \Delta S_T \geq 0

    Or the revolutionary nature of \displaystyle \hbar\frac{\partial}{\partial t}\Psi (x, t) = \hat{H}\Psi (x, t)
    Both have #swag. I know my friend's favourite is the first one.
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    (Original post by Dark Lord of Mordor)
    Both have #swag. I know my friend's favourite is the first one.
    I'd describe the first as elegant and the second as sexy/playful.
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    (Original post by DJMayes)
    What were the equations? :lol:

    (Also, stealing this idea...)
    I have absolutely no idea - I heard the words but they meant nothing to me. Serious maths and I parted company quite a while ago. On the other hand I probably could name you a favourite piece of medical equipment, favourite (non-dirty) anatomical name and have spent far too long debating my "desert island drugs" list.

    I can, however, offer you a maths joke:

    All the exponentials go to a party. x^2 notices e^x sitting in the corner looking sad, so he goes over to ask what's wrong. e^x says "I just feel so lonely," so x^2 suggests "Well, why don't you try to integrate a little more?" to which e^x cries "But it won't make any difference!"

    :getmecoat:
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    (Original post by bananarama2)
    I'd describe the first as elegant and the second as sexy/playful.
    How is that possible?

    (Original post by Helenia)
    I have absolutely no idea - I heard the words but they meant nothing to me. Serious maths and I parted company quite a while ago. On the other hand I probably could name you a favourite piece of medical equipment, favourite (non-dirty) anatomical name and have spent far too long debating my "desert island drugs" list.

    I can, however, offer you a maths joke:

    All the exponentials go to a party. x^2 notices e^x sitting in the corner looking sad, so he goes over to ask what's wrong. e^x says "I just feel so lonely," so x^2 suggests "Well, why don't you try to integrate a little more?" to which e^x cries "But it won't make any difference!"

    :getmecoat:
    Our maths teacher also told us that one

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    (Original post by bananarama2)
    I can't decide....

    I mean the simplicity of  \Delta S_T \geq 0

    Or the revolutionary nature of \displaystyle \hbar\frac{\partial}{\partial t}\Psi (x, t) = \hat{H}\Psi (x, t)
    The thermodynamics laws are all yummy.

    The above equation was just me trying to mash all of physics into one equation. It describes the amplitude to undergo configuration transitions, whilst trying to incorporate quantum mechanics, QFT, general relativity and the standard model. I think I may have forgotten a few masses but the basic idea is there :lol:
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    (Original post by Dark Lord of Mordor)
    How is that possible?
    Look at the curves.
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    (Original post by bananarama2)
    Or the revolutionary nature of \displaystyle \hbar\frac{\partial}{\partial t}\Psi (x, t) = \hat{H}\Psi (x, t)
    That LHS needs a rotation of pi/2 in the complex plane
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    Has anybody any idea how the pooling algorithm for graduates works, and what the chances are to end up at Hughes Hall, Wolfson or one of the other nasty places? The admissions statistics only indicate the numbers of the open applications. Is it likely that those who've chosen two of the old colleges as preferences are being considered for colleges of the same kind/style?

    I do not mean these colleges are nasty by the way, but I hugely prefer old architectural wonders/traditions over the boring and unattractive style of the new colleges. And I am desperate to get to know my fate .

    (I chose Trinity and Gonville&Caius, but was unsuccesful)
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    (Original post by ben-smith)
    That LHS needs a rotation of pi/2 in the complex plane
    Indeed it does

    \displaystyle i\hbar\frac{\partial}{\partial t}\Psi (x, t) = \hat{H}\Psi (x, t)
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    (Original post by Meg94)
    ...and I hope you're not lactose intolerant because the second half of that word is DAIRY!


    Sorry, couldn't help myself.
    Respect :five:
    "Bropology" accepted, I was waiting for someone to pounce on it :cool:
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    (Original post by Homotopic)
    Has anybody any idea how the pooling algorithm for graduates works, and what the chances are to end up at Hughes Hall, Wolfson or one of the other nasty places? The admissions statistics only indicate the numbers of the open applications. Is it likely that those who've chosen two of the old colleges as preferences are being considered for colleges of the same kind/style?

    I do not mean these colleges are nasty by the way, but I hugely prefer old architectural wonders/traditions over the boring and unattractive style of the new colleges. And I am desperate to get to know my fate .

    (I chose Trinity and Gonville&Caius, but was unsuccesful)
    The algorithm is not made public and as far as I'm aware your initial college choice has no bearing on what colleges are likely to consider or take you from the pool.

    It's more likely a mature college will take a mature candidate than a general college. But this is simply because mature colleges have a greater demand and so are able to pick from the pool first (before general colleges).
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    (Original post by Llewellyn)
    Well since I prefer the polyhedral Euler formula over the complex one anyday and that's already been said now.
    \displaystyle W =  \int_{k< \Lambda}^{} [Dg][Da][D \psi][D \Phi] e^{\big\{ i \int d^4x\sqrt{-g}  \big\{\frac{m_p^2}{2}R -  \frac{1}{4} F_{\mu  \nu}^a F^{a \mu  \nu} + i \psi^i \gamma^{ \mu} D_{\mu}  \psi^i +( \overline{ \psi}_L^iV_{ij} \Phi  \psi_R^j + h.c.) - |D_\mu  \Phi |^2 - V( \Phi )\big\}\big\}}
    Did you actually Latex that *****...?
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    (Original post by Llewellyn)
    The algorithm is not made public and as far as I'm aware your initial college choice has no bearing on what colleges are likely to consider or take you from the pool.

    It's more likely a mature college will take a mature candidate than a general college. But this is simply because mature colleges have a greater demand and so are able to pick from the pool first (before general colleges).
    Interesting. Thanks.
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    (Original post by bananarama2)
    Out of interest what is everyone's favourite equation ?
    (Original post by Dark Lord of Mordor)
    y=mx + c
    (Original post by bananarama2)
     \Delta S_T \geq 0
    Well I was going to go for either:
    y=mx + c
    or:  \Delta S_u_n_i_v \geq 0
    but it seems I've already been beaten to both :unimpressed:

    So instead I will have to go for:
    y= \frac{-1}{x^2 -x -5}
    as I used it in my C3 coursework and it kind of looks like a man

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    I think my favourite curve goes to this...

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    And you can find the full parametric equation here (warning: may dazzle anyone who beholds it): http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i...erg+like+curve
 
 
 
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