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    Hi, for my coursework, we're currently analysing sands (oh the joys)
    This sand is from Penarth, in Wales ( just in case that helps) and is from a beach. This is what I've got so far, am I right, and is there anything I've missed?
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    Not that I can see. Have you tried doing hardness tests for each of the grains. If you've got a microscope you'll be able to undertake the hardness test, you could also try running a magnet over the sample to test your theory on the darker mineral being magnetite.

    I just did some coursework on identifying volcanogenic sulphides and we were using the old hand specimen description scheme that had been drilled in at A-level.
    It goes:
    Colour: (speaks for itself)
    Lustre: (if its shiny (metallic) dull (vitreous) or resin-like (resounous))
    Hardness: scratch with finger nail, Cu Coin, Steel Nail, Glass plate (or piece of quartz)
    Streak: What colour does it create when dragged across a ceramic tile
    Magnetic: (Yes or no)- if yes most likely magnetite
    HCL Reation: (yes or no)- if yes containce CaCo3
 
 
 
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