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    So basically im really confused about the stages in the humoral response as my teacher taught us something different than what is in the textbook.

    I was taught that there is firstly an APC (antigen presenting cell) which produces cytokines that attract T Helper Cells which then bind onto the APC and then produce cytokines which attract the B Lymphocytes which then bind onto the APC. The T helper cell then causes the B Lymphocyte to divide by mitosis into memory and plasma cells and they go about their business...

    However the textbook says that the surface antigens are taken up the B Cells which then present them on their surface. T Helper cells then attach to the antigens on the B Cells causing the B cells to divide by mitosis to form plasma cells and memory cells.

    Which one is right? It seems that the one my teacher taught has an extra step of the APC not being a B Cell at the start, instead the B Lymphcytes attach later.
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    bump please help!
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    From what I understand:

    A macrophage can engulf a pathogen and mount the pathogen's antigens on its cell surface membrane, so it becomes and antigen-presenting cell. Then, an inactivated T-helper cell binds to the antigens presented by the APC, and the APC releases cytokines which cause the T-helper cell to become activated and divides to form active T-helper cells and T-memory cells.

    Next, a B-lymphocyte takes up the antigens from another pathogen and presents them. The activated T-helper cell with the complimentary CD4 receptors binds to the B-lymphocyte and releases cytokines, activating the B-cell to differentiate into plasma and memory cells. The plasma cell produces antibodies that will fit to the antigen.
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    (Original post by Harantony)
    From what I understand:

    A macrophage can engulf a pathogen and mount the pathogen's antigens on its cell surface membrane, so it becomes and antigen-presenting cell. Then, an inactivated T-helper cell binds to the antigens presented by the APC, and the APC releases cytokines which cause the T-helper cell to become activated and divides to form active T-helper cells and T-memory cells.

    Next, a B-lymphocyte takes up the antigens from another pathogen and presents them. The activated T-helper cell with the complimentary CD4 receptors binds to the B-lymphocyte and releases cytokines, activating the B-cell to differentiate into plasma and memory cells. The plasma cell produces antibodies that will fit to the antigen.
    absolutely correct. thats what ive learnt.
 
 
 
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