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  • View Poll Results: Who do you think is right?
    The school
    64.56%
    The parents
    14.56%
    The parents are right but should not have sued
    16.46%
    Undecided
    4.43%

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    (Original post by Politricks)
    The girl, I don't see anything wrong with wearing a hijab.



    The school should have thought about the detrimental effects on the girl for being kicked out over wearing a hijab. That girl probably had to go through humility and shame over being kicked out of a school for such a petty reason, and at the age of 9, that could have an effect on her for years after this incident.

    Her parents are justified in suing the school.
    We're not in American.

    The school policy was known to the parents for two years.

    How can you think they were right to sue is beyond me.

    They launched their legal battle with St Cyprian's Greek Orthodox primary in south London after withdrawing their nine-year-old from the school when she was banned from wearing one.
    The school didn't even ban her, the parents withdrew her.
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    (Original post by PauLLL)
    If it's a school of any other religion, then the school every time.

    If the school is in fact a Greek Orthodox school, then the parents agreed for their daughter to go there.

    I despise how people think they have the right to bend or break rules simply because of their religion.

    If I was to create a religion that states it's okay to steal, could you sue the government if they sent you to jail for it?

    'My religion states it's okay, so your rules mean nothing to me, I'm just going to sue you.'


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    This, people always cry freedom to express yourself / your religion, as if it is some sort of excuse.
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    (Original post by Barden)
    It is a state school, is it not?
    uniform rules are always the decision of the school's governing body

    they do not have to have "state approval"
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    (Original post by Politricks)
    The girl, I don't see anything wrong with wearing a hijab.



    The school should have thought about the detrimental effects on the girl for being kicked out over wearing a hijab. That girl probably had to go through humility and shame over being kicked out of a school for such a petty reason, and at the age of 9, that could have an effect on her for years after this incident.

    Her parents are justified in suing the school.

    (Original post by Ebony19)
    The girl.

    She wasn't harming anyone.

    The school is harming someone.
    The school did not kick her out

    Her parents withdrew her

    They decided that the headdress was of greater import than her remaining in that school
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    I understand with a burkha, but a hijab is not that concealing, and thus does not pose a security risk.
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    (Original post by The_Duck)
    I understand with a burkha, but a hijab is not that concealing, and thus does not pose a security risk.
    Schools would typically ban green/pink/yellow trousers - school uniform isn't decided solely on things being security risks, it's also supposed to make all the kids look the same.
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    (Original post by Emaemmaemily)
    I would usually jump right on with supporting the girl in her right to wear a hijab, but after seeing the specifics I support the school this time.
    It is a Greek Orthadox School; when you send your children there, you agree that they will be involved in taking part in the religion throughout their school life (Christian Prayers in Greek, etc), and so you are agreeing to follow that whilst they are there. I can't for the life of me understand why someone who follows an entirely different religion would send their children to that school (or at least, not if they didn't intend on following their rules).

    It would have been made clear that there is a dress code, and that it is a faith school. You can't expect to wear things and express devotion to a different religion whilst there.

    (I'm not religious in any way, just to clarify).
    I think it is safe to say that the parents knew their child would be involved in Christian religion from the start. How are they refusing to follow the policy of taking part in Christian related activities? It is not anti Christian to wear a head scarf.

    Wearing a head scarf is not expressing a devotion to Islam - some Muslim women who wear a head scarf may see it like that but that is an opinion/personal belief. If it were fact women of other faiths in that region would not wear head scarfs.

    As for the bolded part, perhaps it is because the child was attending an expensive private school prior to this one. The Greek school has been rated as outstanding. Happens everywhere.

    Has anyone considered the possibility of the parents bribing the school to let them in? Why would a Greek Christian school prioritise a Muslim over another Christian (assuming it is over subscribed)? Not sure if I 100% believe this just a thought and putting it out there to see what others think. Could explain what is perceived as a disproportionate reaction?


    (Original post by joey81)
    Assuming this is the full hijab complete with face covering I'm on the schools side. If the school is c of e or catholic why would her parents send her there except to use their daughter to price a point which is cruel!

    Also being a teacher un used to teaching without facial expressions it would be impossible to teach someone in that clothing. I would feel it was a barrier to learning I'm afraid.

    Finally if they're asylum seekers I can sway more to their side, especially if its not a religious school. If they are not asylum seekers and have moved to the UK by choice they have to accept certain restrictions in certain circumstances. For example, you go to Muslim countries and you can't wear certain clothing to certain places. This is no different, in English Christian culture covering your face is simply unacceptable in a learning environment.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Firstly the child's face was not covered. You are stating your opinion as fact. Many girls wear a head scarf in schools in England showing quite obviously that it is not unacceptable. I would think it is more unacceptable in our English Christian culture (which promotes tolerance and individual freedom) to expel someone for following their own culture in a way which does not reasonably interfere in anyway with anyone else.

    Your point regarding asylum seekers is ludicrous. For example, country X is a place where women choose to wear a head scarf. Two families move over to the UK. One family moves for work reasons the other due to persecution for their political beliefs. You are saying women belonging to the second family are more entitled to wear a head scarf?

    Also, just because they do not believe in cultural diversity in other parts of the world, it does not mean we should not believe it here. To say well we can't wear what we want there so you can't wear what you want here is backwards in my opinion.
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    (Original post by danny111)
    We're not in American.

    The school policy was known to the parents for two years.

    How can you think they were right to sue is beyond me.



    The school didn't even ban her, the parents withdrew her.
    In my opinion this is similar to constructive dismissal.
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    (Original post by l0uis)
    In my opinion this is similar to constructive dismissal.
    That is of course one interpretation.
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    (Original post by l0uis)
    In my opinion this is similar to constructive dismissal.
    There is no reason to do this unless they don't want the child wearing the headscarf. And since they don't want the child wearing the headscarf then they don't permit it in the dress code. Why on earth would a school construct such a scenario, taking up a place of another child they do want, only to get into hassle in getting rid of her? No, the only people constructing anything are the parents who want their child to wear some stuff and want their child to go to a school where that stuff is forbidden.

    (Original post by danny111)
    That is of course one interpretation.
    Yet not a valid one.
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    I side with the school because it's the school's right to set uniform standards. Why is religious freedom important? What makes it more important than any other desire, i.e. such as wearing a pasta strainer on your head?
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    (Original post by SamHedges)
    But how offensive or unsightly is a hijab though? It's just clothing, I think that as a society we struggle with things that we see differ from the norm..
    What about jeans, man? It's just clothing. Those fascist racists nazis running schools stopping me from wearing jeans, man. Worse than hitler, the school is.
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    (Original post by Barden)
    Wow, a hell of a lot of people seem to support the state telling people what they can and cannot wear... :rolleyes:
    Tell me more about how you've campaigned to ban compulsory uniforms and dress codes in society, education and the workplace.
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    It's a tricky one. I don't see anything wrong in the girl wearing a hijab, but if they school made it pretty clear on their dress procedures then the parents should've thought about that.
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    (Original post by l0uis)
    Whilst technically she may be 'forced' to wear the scarf by her parents, I don't think it is fair in the context you are using it in. They are raising their child in line with their own culture.
    Maybe I'm too culturally used to wearing jeans too much that if any given workplace or educational establishment or organisation tried to impede my human rights of freedom of expression by the use of the fascist 'dress code' then I'll go to the Court of Human Rights. What makes religion so important? What makes other cultures important?
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    It's funny because it's a christian school. So you would think they would understand but it's so true, when people see nuns - who are wearing hijab as hijab just means "covered" and nuns are covered from head to toe as hijab should be. Nobody questions it or is prejudiced against it but when it's a muslim it's a completely different story. What is the difference between a nun and a muslim hijabi woman? Muslim women dress modernly and Nuns just wear black and yet they are looked down on and discriminated against because they want to look nice in a religious way? The school should be ashamed of themselves if you ask me because by rejecting her her right to wear hijab they also reject the views of the original christians and also nuns etc = ). It's a shame that muslim women these days feel they have to take off their hijabs and change who they are so that they dont experience prejudiced. Born and bred in this country i was and when i put on my hijab a few months ago the amount of people telling me to go back to my own country was astonishing. Honestly, What is society becoming.
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    (Original post by DeadGirlsDance)
    I'm not really on either side. The school shouldn't have banned her wearing it as long as it was plain black or went with the uniform. Most schools don't allow students to wear patterned or brightly coloured coats so why should that be any different. I think it's a bit extreme suing the school though and it seems like they're after publicity and money. The money has to come from somewhere and is most likely to end up having an effect on the students there.

    EDIT- I read that it is a Christian school. If it is this case I'm thinking of then I'm with the school. Nine years old is quite young to make a decision on whether or not she wants to wear a hijab.
    Well actually no because she mustve reached puberty this means she wouldve started to grow breasts and a figure and her period etc. This is the transitioning stage into a woman and hijab is meant to conceal all of this. Therefore It is necessary for her to wear hijab.
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    (Original post by russellsteapot)
    The school.

    I assume this is the St Cyprian’s Greek Orthodox Primary School story.

    It has a dress code. The parents were made aware of this when their children started at the school.

    It's also a faith school. If they're that concerned about their daughter 'sinning' by not wearing a hijab (as they are, according to the story), why send her to a Greek Orthodox faith school with daily Christian prayers in Greek and where (according to the Department for Children, Schools and Families' publication 'Faith in the System') , 'the Christian Greek Orthodox ethos pervades all areas of school life'.

    It just seems a little odd to take so much interest in this issue of their faith yet they seem happy to send their child to a school based around an entirely different one. Not saying that faith schools should be limited to intake from their own religion only (I'm not really a fan of faith schools at all, but while they exist they should take in anyone), but if someone is so concerned as to sue a school I would assume a stricter adherence in daily life, including not sending their child to an opposing faith's school...
    In islam, we believe in christianity and we believe in christ. We dont believe he is a God but we believe he is a prophet. We believe the christians, the original ones way back in the day when the bible was first revealed are muslims " Submitters to the will of God" Therefore as long as there is just prayer to God and no worship of Jesus etc and as it's an Orthodox school i would imagine it might be along those lines then praying along side them i believe is ok. Muslims are not forbidden to enter churches.
    Also, i obviously dont know but i think maybe the parents wanted to surround their child with other religious children. In a normal state school there isnt actually that many religious people and by doing this the people they socialised with and turned to when in need would be religiously of the same state of mind. Maybe it was the closest to an islamic school as they could afford and thought that their daughter might get a better education there. I know many muslim sisters that are born muslim but went to catholic school... yes it can be confusing but as opposed to having the social pressures that come from having athiest as friends who are not always understanding of your love of God, it is much better. The less you talk about something the more you forget it and this applys to religion as well = )
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    (Original post by Snagprophet)
    Maybe I'm too culturally used to wearing jeans too much that if any given workplace or educational establishment or organisation tried to impede my human rights of freedom of expression by the use of the fascist 'dress code' then I'll go to the Court of Human Rights. What makes religion so important? What makes other cultures important?
    Islam is not a culture lol.
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    As someone said on the article:
    It's like applying for a job in a Butchers then complaining you don't like what you see because you're a vegetarian....Send your Daughter to the Appropriate School.

    They have no place in sueing the school. It's that schools' values and rules.
    If they don't like it, send her somewhere else.
 
 
 
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