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  • View Poll Results: Who do you think is right?
    The school
    64.56%
    The parents
    14.56%
    The parents are right but should not have sued
    16.46%
    Undecided
    4.43%

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    (Original post by Ebony19)
    Look, I know that seems like it's logical but it's definitely not. Clutching a straws. So the parents are harming loads of pupils by arguing that those who want to wear a piece of material over their hair for religious reasons should be allowed?

    Good effort but no.

    She's a little girl for gods sake. Let her wear her piece of material.

    Go back to your lives and get on with it...
    :facepalm: No, they're harming hundreds of pupils by taking money away from their school.
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    (Original post by Ebony19)
    The fact they were left with no alternative but to withdraw the child and now it's in the public eye, so all the other children at the school can see what's going on...is that a good message being sent by the school to all the other pupils there???
    It's a great message - "Wear our uniform when in school or gtfo". Every school with a uniform policy should do that, else not bother with uniform at all.
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    (Original post by SamHedges)
    You'd never have known

    I agree though, it's double standards, Catholics wear crosses, Muslims wear hijabs. They're both expressing their religion but in different way why should one be allowed and one not?
    Agreed. And furthermore, if you can't see a religious artefact in school, then why can we see it outside of school?
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    (Original post by Guills on wheels)
    Agreed. And furthermore, if you can't see a religious artefact in school, then why can we see it outside of school?
    That's much like asking why we don't see jeans in school. Because there is a uniform at school, and why should exceptions be made for religious artefacts?
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    (Original post by joker12345)
    That's much like asking why we don't see jeans in school. Because there is a uniform at school, and why should exceptions be made for religious artefacts?
    I see school as an entirely different world to the one that lies beyond the gates. The school system is pretty bad actually with dealing with life skills. IB has an attempt with CAS, but it's still pretty poor.

    Not many people I know (I admit, including myself) would be able to look after themselves in life. It's sad.
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    (Original post by joker12345)
    That's much like asking why we don't see jeans in school. Because there is a uniform at school, and why should exceptions be made for religious artefacts?
    Okay, what if a religion demanded a small tattoo on your neck from the age of 12? Tattoos would be against the uniform policy but they obviously wouldn't be able to remove it?

    It's not that disruptive, imagine for example if somebody had an ugly birth mark on their face? When they started school/lessons, for five minutes or so people would be like omg, you have a birthmark on your face, wow! Then the novelty would wear off and people wouldn't think twice about it. The same would go for a hijab, I don't see what's so disruptive about it? Granted it's against the uniform policy but to make the girl take it off is just being officious!
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    I can see the counter argument though, in fairness to the school, the parents must have been aware of the fact that it's a school which primarily follows a different religion to their own with a uniform policy which specifies no hijabs. It seems to me they were looking for conflict it'd be like someone saying no swearing and swearing to spite them and then complaining that they're taking away your freedom of speech
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    (Original post by SamHedges)
    Okay, what if a religion demanded a small tattoo on your neck from the age of 12? Tattoos would be against the uniform policy but they obviously wouldn't be able to remove it?

    It's not that disruptive, imagine for example if somebody had an ugly birth mark on their face? When they started school/lessons, for five minutes or so people would be like omg, you have a birthmark on your face, wow! Then the novelty would wear off and people wouldn't think twice about it. The same would go for a hijab, I don't see what's so disruptive about it? Granted it's against the uniform policy but to make the girl take it off is just being officious!
    Obviously there would be nothing they could do about it, it would likely be at the school's dicretion here (whether religious or not, religion doesn't come into it.)
    The same could be argued for someone who wanted to wear a scarf every day. And the birthmark example isn't comparable because there's nothing they could do about it.
    The issue is the double standards.
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    (Original post by SamHedges)
    Okay, what if a religion demanded a small tattoo on your neck from the age of 12? Tattoos would be against the uniform policy but they obviously wouldn't be able to remove it?

    It's not that disruptive, imagine for example if somebody had an ugly birth mark on their face? When they started school/lessons, for five minutes or so people would be like omg, you have a birthmark on your face, wow! Then the novelty would wear off and people wouldn't think twice about it. The same would go for a hijab, I don't see what's so disruptive about it? Granted it's against the uniform policy but to make the girl take it off is just being officious!
    This is the problem that arises when Religious tradition requires the breaking or suspension of pre-existing laws and rules. The consequences for someone getting a religious tattoo should be exactly the same as if they got a tattoo for non-religious reasons.
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    I guess so, and find a school which accepts it instead of enforcing your own religion on others
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    Well if its officially a 'greek orthodox' school, I don't have a clue on why her parents would send her there in the first place. You wouldn't see christians in a muslim school, ever.
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    (Original post by Ebony19)
    Look, I know that seems like it's logical but it's definitely not. Clutching a straws. So the parents are harming loads of pupils by arguing that those who want to wear a piece of material over their hair for religious reasons should be allowed?

    Good effort but no.

    She's a little girl for gods sake. Let her wear her piece of material.

    Go back to your lives and get on with it...
    Its taking money from the school by taking them to court.

    Also if it is allowed based on religious reason then the school should make credence for every rule due to religion.

    My religion says i must wear jewelry honoring the saint stalin. Should my school, ore work place make an exception. No

    The parents are aware of the schools policy. If they dislike the policy don't try and join.
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    It's a tricky dicky. One the one hand, I support the right of the school to decide what is part of their uniform, and, as a Christian school, it is understandable that wearing Muslim dress could be controversial.

    On the other hand, the girl (or, in this case, more her parents) has a right to express her religious identity. I do think nine is far too young to see a girl's hair as sexualized, but each to their own.
 
 
 
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