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    Hey guys,

    I just wanted to ask, what can you do after you achieved MBChB degree? I know you have to do 2 years of experience and afterwards i read you have to study 6+ year more for some reason. Is it true? Can't i just work after i have done my experience. I would really like to study surgery, as i'm really interested in it, and i know it is suitable career for me, but i'm really getting confused about this university situation. Could you please help me? And what do they mean by Foundation 1 and Foundation 2?
    Thanks a lot
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    'Afterwards 6+ years of university again?' <-- Sorry but what do you mean?
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    (Original post by 2Meggi00)
    Hey guys,

    I just wanted to ask, what can you do after you achieved MBChB degree? I know you have to do 2 years of experience and afterwards 6+ years of university again? Can't i just work after i have done my experience. I would really like to study surgery, as i'm really interested in it, and i know it is suitable career for me, but i'm really getting confused about this university situation. Could you please help me?

    Thanks a lot
    It seems like you've gotten some misinformation somewhere along the line. After your 5 or 6 years at medical school, you graduate as a doctor, you then spend the next 2 years of your life as a "junior doctor". This involves you rotating around specialties for two years (for example, vascular surgery to emergency medicine to dermatology); you switch every few months.

    After those two years are up, you start "specialty training". This, like being a junior doctor, is "on the job" training. You don't have to go back to university for it like you seem to think! Specialty training is in a specialty of your choice (given that they choose to accept you; competition can get quite hot), and the length of it varies per specialty. Some of the longest being surgery, and the shortest being GP (which I think has a separate programme from the other specialties). The way the specialty training works can be pretty confusing (weird different stages that come into play), though. I don't fully understand it yet!
    After all of this, you end up gaining your "Certificate of Completion of Training" and can apply for consultancy positions.

    On the way to this, after graduating medical school, you still have a lot of postgraduate exams to sit! So don't think you get away from them as you finish uni.

    Clinical medicine also isn't your only choice after the MBChB, some people go into research or go on to do a PhD (aided by an intercalated degree they'll probably have chosen to do), some can go work with the pharmaceutical industry, teaching, and I've even heard of people going into journalism!

    The TSR wiki has a lot of information about medicine that you can check out. And you can always find information by checking out relevant organisations.


    (Original post by Muppet Science)
    'Afterwards 6+ years of university again?' <-- Sorry but what do you mean?
    I interpreted it as another 6+ years studying at university after graduating with the medicine degree and working for two years.

    Kill me now if that's what I've signed up for!

    Edit: I've just seen your edit. Foundation Year 1 and Foundation Year 2 (commonly abbreviated as FY1 and FY2 or F1 and F2) are the first 2 years after you graduate; when you work as a junior doctor. Named such because this period of time is when you're participating in the "foundation programme", the key aim is training you in competency.

    Another key difference is that with F1 you're only provisionally registered with the GMC, and upon completion of it, you become fully registered and moved onto F2.

    Another thing to note is that although it's called "year 1" and "year 2", you can take longer than that to complete it. It's mostly based around an hours thing, so if in case of special circumstances, you can only work half the time, you just take twice as long to finish F1 - at least that's what I've gathered from stalking the doctors soc!
    Someone do correct me if I'm wrong anywhere.

    The FP website has an FAQ for medical students, this is obviously in a lot more depth than you need to know, but if you look you should be able to find answers to your questions about it.

    Further information can be found in this wikipedia article, the table under "MTAS" (although the MTAS system has been scrapped, I think that layout is still applicable) is pretty useful, and on the NHS website.
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    (Original post by Hype en Ecosse)
    It seems like you've gotten some misinformation somewhere along the line. After your 5 or 6 years at medical school, you graduate as a doctor, you then spend the next 2 years of your life as a "junior doctor". This involves you rotating around specialties for two years (for example, vascular surgery to emergency medicine to dermatology); you switch every few months.

    After those two years are up, you start "specialty training". This, like being a junior doctor, is "on the job" training. You don't have to go back to university for it like you seem to think! Specialty training is in a specialty of your choice (given that they choose to accept you; competition can get quite hot), and the length of it varies per specialty. Some of the longest being surgery, and the shortest being GP (which I think has a separate programme from the other specialties). The way the specialty training works can be pretty confusing (weird different stages that come into play), though. I don't fully understand it yet!
    After all of this, you end up gaining your "Certificate of Completion of Training" and can apply for consultancy positions.

    On the way to this, after graduating medical school, you still have a lot of postgraduate exams to sit! So don't think you get away from them as you finish uni.

    Clinical medicine also isn't your only choice after the MBChB, some people go into research or go on to do a PhD (aided by an intercalated degree they'll probably have chosen to do), some can go work with the pharmaceutical industry, teaching, and I've even heard of people going into journalism!

    The TSR wiki has a lot of information about medicine that you can check out. And you can always find information by checking out relevant organisations.




    I interpreted it as another 6+ years studying at university after graduating with the medicine degree and working for two years.

    Kill me now if that's what I've signed up for!

    Edit: I've just seen your edit. Foundation Year 1 and Foundation Year 2 (commonly abbreviated as FY1 and FY2 or F1 and F2) are the first 2 years after you graduate; when you work as a junior doctor. Named such because this period of time is when you're participating in the "foundation programme", the key aim is training you in competency.

    Another key difference is that with F1 you're only provisionally registered with the GMC, and upon completion of it, you become fully registered and moved onto F2.

    Another thing to note is that although it's called "year 1" and "year 2", you can take longer than that to complete it. It's mostly based around an hours thing, so if in case of special circumstances, you can only work half the time, you just take twice as long to finish F1 - at least that's what I've gathered from stalking the doctors soc!
    Someone do correct me if I'm wrong anywhere.

    The FP website has an FAQ for medical students, this is obviously in a lot more depth than you need to know, but if you look you should be able to find answers to your questions about it.

    Further information can be found in this wikipedia article, the table under "MTAS" (although the MTAS system has been scrapped, I think that layout is still applicable) is pretty useful, and on the NHS website.
    Ah OK I was wondering whether they had gotten specialty training mixed up with uni work
 
 
 
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