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Law - becoming devalued? watch

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    As longs as the courses are moderated by external bodies 0(which they are) then I don't really see the problem. A lot of people say you need to go to Oxbridge to become a lawyer but if that was true the maths simply would not add up. I am not sure how many there but I am pretty certain a lot would have gone to only average universities.
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    There is intense competeition to get onto the LPC and BVC professional training courses, even before the training contract/pupilage "on-the-job" stage. It gets harder to get through at each stage, so the on the job training isn't like a backdoor into the legal profession.
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    (Original post by Amazing)
    As I said, you CAN study Law at University, just not a full Law degree. Which really makes sense, considering there are many more people than places who want to do a Law degree at the moment who are actualy getting the necessary high grades as it is.
    I don't think people who want to do a Law degree at Oxbridge, LSE etc face any competition from those doing one at an ex-poly... so what's the problem? They should do a full degree if they want to, A-levels do not necessarily display your intelligence anyway- and these degrees will give the students who have the ability and talent, the option to carry on with Law if they wish to.
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    (Original post by Elle)
    Shouldn't that be their choice? Shouldn't we at least give them the opportunity to find out?
    So are you going Sheffield then?
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    (Original post by Bhaal85)
    So are you going Sheffield then?
    Probably .. I'm still waiting to hear from LSE and UCL but I don't expect to get an offer from either. I'm not too worried about getting rejected from them since Sheffield sounds pretty good. What about you?
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    Are you definitely coming to sheffield then Bhaal?
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    (Original post by viviki)
    Are you definitely coming to sheffield then Bhaal?
    Yep. Got the grades AAB. Now I just need to find out more info about accomodation. So I might bump into you. Anyway I'm still gonna carry on at college and get AAA.
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    one fo my friends got onto a law degree at one of the old Poly's with CCC. Part of me thinks it is a waste of time. ITs so competitve getting into the LPC course etc or to even find work so I can't help thinking that lots of people will be dissapointed when they come to graduate. Aparently a lot of the Law firms in London ask for at least 26 points at A-level regardless of what degree classification you got. Also lots of them will only recruit from the more prestigious university. Its really difficult because everyone has the right to study what they want but people hace got to be realsitic about wht they will be able to do with their degre afterwards.
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    (Original post by Pencil Queen)
    But A levels don't test how good a doctor you will be - simply how good your knowledge and understanding of a simple subject is.

    Doctors have to pass a medicine degree - if they're capable of that then they've proved themselves more than capable of doing the job - regardless of A level grades.

    I couldn't care less if my doctor knew newtons laws of motion and how to apply them - so long as s/he is capable of diagnosing any illnesses I have and prescribing appropriate treatment
    Absolutely. I couldn't care less what A levels my doctor has (or even if he has any at all for that matter)

    Christopher Wren didn't have a BArch degree but I'd hapilly employ him to design an extension on my house (if he wasn't dead)
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    Are you going to go catered or self catered?

    Have you had all the accom stuff through? If not then this'll give you a headstart.

    http://www.shef.ac.uk/housing/new_students
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    (Original post by Howard)
    Absolutely. I couldn't care less what A levels my doctor has (or even if he has any at all for that matter)

    Christopher Wren didn't have a BArch degree but I'd hapilly employ him to design an extension on my house (if he wasn't dead)
    I was gonna say, it might be somewhat impossible. lol.
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    (Original post by emom100)
    one fo my friends got onto a law degree at one of the old Poly's with CCC. Part of me thinks it is a waste of time. ITs so competitve getting into the LPC course etc or to even find work so I can't help thinking that lots of people will be dissapointed when they come to graduate. Aparently a lot of the Law firms in London ask for at least 26 points at A-level regardless of what degree classification you got. Also lots of them will only recruit from the more prestigious university. Its really difficult because everyone has the right to study what they want but people hace got to be realsitic about wht they will be able to do with their degre afterwards.
    Surely people will research this before hand.
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    (Original post by emom100)
    one fo my friends got onto a law degree at one of the old Poly's with CCC. Part of me thinks it is a waste of time. ITs so competitve getting into the LPC course etc or to even find work so I can't help thinking that lots of people will be dissapointed when they come to graduate. Aparently a lot of the Law firms in London ask for at least 26 points at A-level regardless of what degree classification you got. Also lots of them will only recruit from the more prestigious university. Its really difficult because everyone has the right to study what they want but people hace got to be realsitic about wht they will be able to do with their degre afterwards.
    Some of them ask for 28+ its really competitive some look for life skills though so you're not out of the market. You really have to prove yourself tho. Work exp is a must.
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    (Original post by viviki)
    Are you going to go catered or self catered?

    Have you had all the accom stuff through? If not then this'll give you a headstart.

    http://www.shef.ac.uk/housing/new_students
    Being a first year student I was gonna go catered, however you have to eat at certan tinmes and may be a big stint on plans. So I am really considering slf-catered. Which would you recommend?

    (I'll be back in 15 minutes)
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    (Original post by viviki)
    Some of them ask for 28+ its really competitive some look for life skills though so you're not out of the market. You really have to prove yourself tho. Work exp is a must.
    But never overlook the obvious. Networking is more important than anything.

    Your family solicitor (if you have one that your family uses on a regular basis for buying/selling houses, writing wills etc) is many folks best chance at getting his/her foot in the door. He/she is well worth getting to know on a personal level.

    Better still if you are on first name/drinking terms with a Barrister.

    As with most things in life, it's not what you know but who you know.
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    Well I'm in Broad Lane - the pros are that its quite nice as far as uni accom goes, and has biggish kitchens and en suites if you want them, and its near to town, next to west street and the uni bookshop, also really close to the union and lectures in the octagon so you dont have to go far.

    The cons are - you get the ladies of the night hanging round the road behind it, its pretty noisy, its miles away from the law building more than 20 mins walk. I dont think that the social side is very good maybe this is better in catered halls?


    Crooksmoor house is nice and opposite the law dept and mainly has law students but the cons of that one are that it doesnt house that many students. i like to live in a big place cos you have more chance of meeting people you like

    I had taptonville flats as my second choice last year because its pretty cheap and a convenient location. It might be worth asking expression or Byb3 because they are prob more expert on first year accommodation than me. The postgrad choice was more limited.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    But never overlook the obvious. Networking is more important than anything.

    Your family solicitor (if you have one that your family uses on a regular basis for buying/selling houses, writing wills etc) is many folks best chance at getting his/her foot in the door. He/she is well worth getting to know on a personal level.

    Better still if you are on first name/drinking terms with a Barrister.

    As with most things in life, it's not what you know but who you know.
    i'm not interested in working in London I'm not much of a big city girl. i've already approached all the smaller law firms at home and i have some pretty good contacts.
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    (Original post by Mark_KK)
    You DONT need to do Law to beomce a Barrister / Solicitor, if you can find someone who will "train you up" you can still do it although these opportunities are incredibly rare and it costs alot for a Law firm to put you through it.

    Hence the fact that a Law degree is preferable...
    What? Over 30% of solicitors do not hold a law degree! It is certainly not neccessary to have one to go into law.

    These opportunities are hardly "incredibly rare", hundreds of people are "trained up" by law firms and many pay themselves to do the law conversion. Once the conversion is done, you cost a law firm no more than any other recruit, so it hardly "costs alot".

    Some solicitors think that a law degree is not preferable. If so many successful solicitros can et by with only one year's law course on top of a different degree, why must it be studied for three years by others?
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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    Some solicitors think that a law degree is not preferable. If so many successful solicitros can et by with only one year's law course on top of a different degree, why must it be studied for three years by others?
    Non law graduates need to do a 1 year CPE "common professional entrance" course in the form of a DipLaw.

    Then potential Barristers do a 1 year BVC "bar vocational" course and potential solicitors do a 1 year LPC "legal practice" course.

    So, for non law graduates a minimum of two years full time legal study is required on top of their non-law degrees before entering into a

    1 year pupillage (Barristers)
    2 year training contract (Solicitors)
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    (Original post by Howard)
    Non law graduates need to do a 1 year CPE "common professional entrance" course in the form of a DipLaw.

    Then potential Barristers do a 1 year BVC "bar vocational" course and potential solicitors do a 1 year LPC "legal practice" course.

    So, for non law graduates a minimum of two years full time legal study is required on top of their non-law degrees before entering into a

    1 year pupillage (Barristers)
    2 year training contract (Solicitors)
    Which is only one extra year to law graduates.
 
 
 
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