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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    Which is only one extra year to law graduates.
    Correctamundo.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    Correctamundo.
    so which stage of this are you at?
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    (Original post by llama boy)
    so which stage of this are you at?
    Oh none I'm afraid. I finished my LLb but didn't go any further down the road than that.
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    (Original post by Amazing)
    How would you feel if a doctor who could end up treating you - and can be IN CONTROL OF YOUR LIFE - wasn't intelligent enough to get good A levels? Wouldn't you feel the same way about a Lawyer, who can be responsible for whether you GO TO PRISON or not?
    We're not talking "I managed to scrape 60 UCAS points by getting an E in Vocational Leisure & Tourism and a Key Skills in Not Being A Zombie", we're talking good A-C grades etc. If someone got 240-280-ish UCAS points (excluding all that nonsense stuff like Key Skills and General Studies), I see no reason why not to let them study law. As long as people are aware of the amount of work that goes in to a degree like law, and still show dedication and a decent amount of UCAS points, I'm not sure why there is any problem.
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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    What? Over 30% of solicitors do not hold a law degree! It is certainly not neccessary to have one to go into law.

    These opportunities are hardly "incredibly rare", hundreds of people are "trained up" by law firms and many pay themselves to do the law conversion. Once the conversion is done, you cost a law firm no more than any other recruit, so it hardly "costs alot".

    Some solicitors think that a law degree is not preferable. If so many successful solicitros can et by with only one year's law course on top of a different degree, why must it be studied for three years by others?
    If you want to go in to the legal profession, you need to have a degree and convert. Conversion costs a fair bit (one year of living expenses, plus a few grand for the tuition). If you know you want to go in to the profession, why not just do a law degree?

    Plus if you have aims of going in to legal academics, you are better placed with an LL.B than a Bachelor's degree. There's the academic/professional argument - people may want to study law for academic reasons. Nothing wrong with that.
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    (Original post by tommorris)
    We're not talking "I managed to scrape 60 UCAS points by getting an E in Vocational Leisure & Tourism and a Key Skills in Not Being A Zombie", we're talking good A-C grades etc. If someone got 240-280-ish UCAS points (excluding all that nonsense stuff like Key Skills and General Studies), I see no reason why not to let them study law. As long as people are aware of the amount of work that goes in to a degree like law, and still show dedication and a decent amount of UCAS points, I'm not sure why there is any problem.
    Lots of dumb people who get 5A-C GCSE and CCD in micky mouse subjects go on to study law at a crappy university. I have no idea if they will go on to get a job as a lawyer and if they do they shouldn't.
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    LLB followed by LLM - i will be a rich man
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    Don't forget the LPC course you have to do, that takes one year, and can cost more than £9000 depending upon where you go. That is after you have your law degree!!!
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    Big Sigh
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    (Original post by tommorris)
    If you want to go in to the legal profession, you need to have a degree and convert. Conversion costs a fair bit (one year of living expenses, plus a few grand for the tuition). If you know you want to go in to the profession, why not just do a law degree?

    Plus if you have aims of going in to legal academics, you are better placed with an LL.B than a Bachelor's degree. There's the academic/professional argument - people may want to study law for academic reasons. Nothing wrong with that.
    There is a school of thought which says "too early a specialisation in the law can narrow rather than broaden the mind by depriving the student of the opportunity to be exposed to other disciplines".

    This view is held by some established legal practitioners.
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    (Original post by Lord Huntroyde)
    There is a school of thought which says "too early a specialisation in the law can narrow rather than broaden the mind by depriving the student of the opportunity to be exposed to other disciplines".

    This view is held by some established legal practitioners.
    I find it very interesting that a recent survey* of law professors across both the traditional and the ex-poly universities found that there is a significant embrace of contextual legal studies within the LL.B framework - legal theory, criminology, combination studies with areas like psychology, sociology, politics and philosophy, and legal application studies like modules in medicinal law etc.

    The fact is, contrary to the belief that the LL.B structure is practice-oriented, there is a renaissance of critical and contextual studies taking place. The CPE paints a picture of what the professions need. You can cram everything you need to be a solicitor/barrister in to one year (of the top of my head, it is contract, tort, crime, equity/trusts, procedure and a few other bits and bobs), but the three years provides adequate time for students to explore related fields of academia.

    * I recently attended the National Critical Legal Conference in Canterbury, and one of the speakers had recently produced a survey of this issue and many other issues relevant to academics within legal study. Can't remember off the top of my head who it was, but if anyone is interested, I can look it up.
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    (Original post by Bhaal85)
    Don't forget the LPC course you have to do, that takes one year, and can cost more than £9000 depending upon where you go. That is after you have your law degree!!!
    Take a look through some legal appointments adverts and you may notice that many of the bigger firms are accepting both top-of-the-pile law graduates and CPE students and financing them through LPC. Some chambers are also doing this, but (as with everything at the Bar) there is less of it and more competition for it.
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    (Original post by tommorris)
    I find it very interesting that a recent survey* of law professors across both the traditional and the ex-poly universities found that there is a significant embrace of contextual legal studies within the LL.B framework - legal theory, criminology, combination studies with areas like psychology, sociology, politics and philosophy, and legal application studies like modules in medicinal law etc.

    The fact is, contrary to the belief that the LL.B structure is practice-oriented, there is a renaissance of critical and contextual studies taking place. The CPE paints a picture of what the professions need. You can cram everything you need to be a solicitor/barrister in to one year (of the top of my head, it is contract, tort, crime, equity/trusts, procedure and a few other bits and bobs), but the three years provides adequate time for students to explore related fields of academia.

    * I recently attended the National Critical Legal Conference in Canterbury, and one of the speakers had recently produced a survey of this issue and many other issues relevant to academics within legal study. Can't remember off the top of my head who it was, but if anyone is interested, I can look it up.
    Excellent post.

    I would agree with you - I am hoping to study Law myself oneday. I was posting the views held by some people.
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    (Original post by tommorris)
    Take a look through some legal appointments adverts and you may notice that many of the bigger firms are accepting both top-of-the-pile law graduates and CPE students and financing them through LPC. Some chambers are also doing this, but (as with everything at the Bar) there is less of it and more competition for it.
    Someone I know has recently decided to change careers. They were on £40,000 a year, and decided to embark upon a law degree, hoping to enter the legal profession. However the costs are huge, cost of living whilst studying, food, bills, as well as supporting a family. So she decided that it would be best getting sponsored, now the company whom is sponsoring her through her studies are paying the majority of her costs, but as soon as she graduates, she will be on a lot lower salary than before, I beleive it was something like £22,500 annually. Plus the fact that there is a minimum term. So I would rather be in debt, which I can pay off, than be stuck in one place.
 
 
 
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