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    So basically I'm hoping for some advice. I had a pretty poor first term, and I've pretty stressed over the break as well, so I'm weighing up my options. The tl;dr version is in bold.
    • I don't like the course. I opted for Maths with Physics because I don't particularly like pure maths but equally didn't want to have to do many experiments. It turns out that I have to do a lot of both of those things, and there's no real way of avoiding them both until at least third year - I'd have to do pure in IB Maths and experiments in IB Physics.
    • I'm struggling with the work. Not liking it probably doesn't help, but the pace is too fast and I got behind very quickly. I understand most of lectures (or so I think) but then have no idea what to do on the examples sheets and have to spend even longer sifting through notes to try to get a handle of what's going on.
    • I can't get away from the work, either. There's just too much of it, and whenever I have a break from it, I'm either worrying about not having done enough or I have no energy to do anything else. At home I like to read, I have an interest in programming and quizzes (hence the username) but in college I feel lethargic.
    • I don't like the social side. I'm no party animal, and would rather have a quiet drink at a pub, but everyone else seems to either be focused on work, at some kind of society event, or getting completely bladdered. And of course, nursing a pint is a bit of a time sink, and time is a luxury. I played in the college orchestra, but it felt like a wasted two hours every week, and went to pub quizzes on Sundays, which frankly were the only thing I genuinely enjoyed all term.
    • I don't particularly care about the subject. Everyone else on my course seems to be genuinely interested in maths, can reel off a dozen digits of pi or e. I only have a passing interest in it, and completely balk at the idea of doing research. I have nothing against academia for the sake of itself, but it's just not for me, and I feel that's making my life a lot harder at somewhere like Cambridge where you really do need to want to do the work.
    I feel like if it was only one or two of these then I might be able to muddle through but I don't really think any of it suits me. So, am I alone? Can it get better? I'm seriously considering trying to transfer to my insurance choice, Mathematical Physics at Nottingham. I know it doesn't have the "prestige" but I think a little less pressure and a course I have a chance of enjoying would give me a much better chance.

    Help! Any opinions are appreciated and I will try to answer questions.
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    Ask if you can switch courses and hope for the best and since you're good at maths and physics but not too interested in them you should try out engineering, economics or even finance
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    (Original post by Quizzimodo)
    So basically I'm hoping for some advice. I had a pretty poor first term, and I've pretty stressed over the break as well, so I'm weighing up my options. The tl;dr version is in bold.
    • I don't like the course. I opted for Maths with Physics because I don't particularly like pure maths but equally didn't want to have to do many experiments. It turns out that I have to do a lot of both of those things, and there's no real way of avoiding them both until at least third year - I'd have to do pure in IB Maths and experiments in IB Physics.
    • I'm struggling with the work. Not liking it probably doesn't help, but the pace is too fast and I got behind very quickly. I understand most of lectures (or so I think) but then have no idea what to do on the examples sheets and have to spend even longer sifting through notes to try to get a handle of what's going on.
    • I can't get away from the work, either. There's just too much of it, and whenever I have a break from it, I'm either worrying about not having done enough or I have no energy to do anything else. At home I like to read, I have an interest in programming and quizzes (hence the username) but in college I feel lethargic.
    • I don't like the social side. I'm no party animal, and would rather have a quiet drink at a pub, but everyone else seems to either be focused on work, at some kind of society event, or getting completely bladdered. And of course, nursing a pint is a bit of a time sink, and time is a luxury. I played in the college orchestra, but it felt like a wasted two hours every week, and went to pub quizzes on Sundays, which frankly were the only thing I genuinely enjoyed all term.
    • I don't particularly care about the subject. Everyone else on my course seems to be genuinely interested in maths, can reel off a dozen digits of pi or e. I only have a passing interest in it, and completely balk at the idea of doing research. I have nothing against academia for the sake of itself, but it's just not for me, and I feel that's making my life a lot harder at somewhere like Cambridge where you really do need to want to do the work.
    I feel like if it was only one or two of these then I might be able to muddle through but I don't really think any of it suits me. So, am I alone? Can it get better? I'm seriously considering trying to transfer to my insurance choice, Mathematical Physics at Nottingham. I know it doesn't have the "prestige" but I think a little less pressure and a course I have a chance of enjoying would give me a much better chance.

    Help! Any opinions are appreciated and I will try to answer questions.
    Have you thought about trying to move to computer science? That is pretty mathsy but isn't pure maths and you say you have an interest in programming so it might be for you...
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    I'm in basically the same situation but with Law, and while I'm a bit more keen on the subject than you seem to be for yours, I still feel like the odd one out among the other lawyers, all of whom want to go on to be either barristers or solicitors - I'm not personally too fussed about that.

    Can't offer you any advice as I'm still struggling to get my head round things myself, but thought it was worth letting you know you're not the only one!
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    If you are not happy then leave. I think quite a few people get caught up in the Oxbridge dream but forget there is a reason for its reputation. Try another course first if you can, but it isn't like you're a failure if you do leave.
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    Leave!! Staying won't do you any favours.
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    On Monday:
    - call Nottingham to ask them about transferring.
    - speak to your tutor and tell him/her what you've said in your OP.

    Hopefully you'll get enough help from both sources to know whether you want to stay or take the rest of the year out and go to Nottingham in October.
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    (Original post by Quizzimodo)
    So basically I'm hoping for some advice. I had a pretty poor first term, and I've pretty stressed over the break as well, so I'm weighing up my options. The tl;dr version is in bold.
    • I don't like the course. I opted for Maths with Physics because I don't particularly like pure maths but equally didn't want to have to do many experiments. It turns out that I have to do a lot of both of those things, and there's no real way of avoiding them both until at least third year - I'd have to do pure in IB Maths and experiments in IB Physics.
    • I'm struggling with the work. Not liking it probably doesn't help, but the pace is too fast and I got behind very quickly. I understand most of lectures (or so I think) but then have no idea what to do on the examples sheets and have to spend even longer sifting through notes to try to get a handle of what's going on.
    • I can't get away from the work, either. There's just too much of it, and whenever I have a break from it, I'm either worrying about not having done enough or I have no energy to do anything else. At home I like to read, I have an interest in programming and quizzes (hence the username) but in college I feel lethargic.
    • I don't like the social side. I'm no party animal, and would rather have a quiet drink at a pub, but everyone else seems to either be focused on work, at some kind of society event, or getting completely bladdered. And of course, nursing a pint is a bit of a time sink, and time is a luxury. I played in the college orchestra, but it felt like a wasted two hours every week, and went to pub quizzes on Sundays, which frankly were the only thing I genuinely enjoyed all term.
    • I don't particularly care about the subject. Everyone else on my course seems to be genuinely interested in maths, can reel off a dozen digits of pi or e. I only have a passing interest in it, and completely balk at the idea of doing research. I have nothing against academia for the sake of itself, but it's just not for me, and I feel that's making my life a lot harder at somewhere like Cambridge where you really do need to want to do the work.
    I feel like if it was only one or two of these then I might be able to muddle through but I don't really think any of it suits me. So, am I alone? Can it get better? I'm seriously considering trying to transfer to my insurance choice, Mathematical Physics at Nottingham. I know it doesn't have the "prestige" but I think a little less pressure and a course I have a chance of enjoying would give me a much better chance.

    Help! Any opinions are appreciated and I will try to answer questions.
    OMG someone else who is struggling!. Sorry but I just assume everyone gets it (tbh i did do very little work in first term but still) and are probably better than me anyway. (i'm also first year but just maths/no physics).

    just read my post and realised it makes me sound happy your struggling!. I'm not.
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    (Original post by Quizzimodo)
    So basically I'm hoping for some advice. I had a pretty poor first term, and I've pretty stressed over the break as well, so I'm weighing up my options. The tl;dr version is in bold.
    • I don't like the course. I opted for Maths with Physics because I don't particularly like pure maths but equally didn't want to have to do many experiments. It turns out that I have to do a lot of both of those things, and there's no real way of avoiding them both until at least third year - I'd have to do pure in IB Maths and experiments in IB Physics.
    • I'm struggling with the work. Not liking it probably doesn't help, but the pace is too fast and I got behind very quickly. I understand most of lectures (or so I think) but then have no idea what to do on the examples sheets and have to spend even longer sifting through notes to try to get a handle of what's going on.
    • I can't get away from the work, either. There's just too much of it, and whenever I have a break from it, I'm either worrying about not having done enough or I have no energy to do anything else. At home I like to read, I have an interest in programming and quizzes (hence the username) but in college I feel lethargic.
    • I don't like the social side. I'm no party animal, and would rather have a quiet drink at a pub, but everyone else seems to either be focused on work, at some kind of society event, or getting completely bladdered. And of course, nursing a pint is a bit of a time sink, and time is a luxury. I played in the college orchestra, but it felt like a wasted two hours every week, and went to pub quizzes on Sundays, which frankly were the only thing I genuinely enjoyed all term.
    • I don't particularly care about the subject. Everyone else on my course seems to be genuinely interested in maths, can reel off a dozen digits of pi or e. I only have a passing interest in it, and completely balk at the idea of doing research. I have nothing against academia for the sake of itself, but it's just not for me, and I feel that's making my life a lot harder at somewhere like Cambridge where you really do need to want to do the work.

    I feel like if it was only one or two of these then I might be able to muddle through but I don't really think any of it suits me. So, am I alone? Can it get better? I'm seriously considering trying to transfer to my insurance choice, Mathematical Physics at Nottingham. I know it doesn't have the "prestige" but I think a little less pressure and a course I have a chance of enjoying would give me a much better chance.

    Help! Any opinions are appreciated and I will try to answer questions.
    I think you should have a conversation - urgently - with your pastoral tutor. There will be support available within the university to help you work through your thoughts and feelings about the course and help you come to a considered decision about whether to continue or not.

    Don't leave it- this needs to be the first thing on your 'to do' list, and you can start the ball rolling before you go back. If you are thinking that you might not go back at all, a chat with your GP mightn't be a bad idea as it sounds to me as if you may be bit over-anxious and/or depressed because of how things have been going. There are hints in what you've said - such as thinking the two hours spent doing something you would normally enjoy (otherwise why did you sign up for it in the first place?) were wasted - that suggest this to me.

    It's also important to remember that not everyone finds their first term the blissful experience they expect after all the euphoria of getting an offer and then managing to meet it. There's been a lot of change in your life, by definition (and if there's been stuff going on at home while you've been away this is likely to be playing a big part in how you're feeling as well). Change is hard work.

    I'm not saying "it's Cambridge, you have to stay"- what I am saying is that it's important to make sure that you really have considered all the possibilities (eg changing to computer science sounds worth looking at, if the system allows it) before making a decision (either way) that you might later regret.
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    Thank you for all your replies. I'm a little surprised nobody has suggested staying on with maths, so I assume the "not liking it and praying it still happens" approach isn't an effective one!

    (Original post by Ali_M10)
    Ask if you can switch courses and hope for the best and since you're good at maths and physics but not too interested in them you should try out engineering, economics or even finance
    (Original post by ROBBY7896)
    Have you thought about trying to move to computer science? That is pretty mathsy but isn't pure maths and you say you have an interest in programming so it might be for you...
    I've certainly looked at other courses, but all of them have downsides that make me feel like I'd still have to pour huge amounts of time into them. Economics has essays that I'm not only poor at but I also have no background knowledge in it and would have to spend a good deal of time researching. CompSci seems very focused on logic and abstracted theory from what I've gathered talking to people in college, and that's exactly the part I hate about maths. Engineering is the only one I'd seriously consider, but yet more practicals are putting me off there. An engineer friend did suggest I might be more suited to it.

    (Original post by Crumpet1)
    On Monday:
    - call Nottingham to ask them about transferring.
    - speak to your tutor and tell him/her what you've said in your OP.

    Hopefully you'll get enough help from both sources to know whether you want to stay or take the rest of the year out and go to Nottingham in October.
    (Original post by Minerva)
    I think you should have a conversation - urgently - with your pastoral tutor. There will be support available within the university to help you work through your thoughts and feelings about the course and help you come to a considered decision about whether to continue or not.

    Don't leave it- this needs to be the first thing on your 'to do' list, and you can start the ball rolling before you go back. If you are thinking that you might not go back at all, a chat with your GP mightn't be a bad idea as it sounds to me as if you may be bit over-anxious and/or depressed because of how things have been going. There are hints in what you've said - such as thinking the two hours spent doing something you would normally enjoy (otherwise why did you sign up for it in the first place?) were wasted - that suggest this to me.

    It's also important to remember that not everyone finds their first term the blissful experience they expect after all the euphoria of getting an offer and then managing to meet it. There's been a lot of change in your life, by definition (and if there's been stuff going on at home while you've been away this is likely to be playing a big part in how you're feeling as well). Change is hard work.

    I'm not saying "it's Cambridge, you have to stay"- what I am saying is that it's important to make sure that you really have considered all the possibilities (eg changing to computer science sounds worth looking at, if the system allows it) before making a decision (either way) that you might later regret.
    Is talking to a tutor something that can be done via email or is that bad form? My DoSes for maths are also very involved so I feel it would be good to contact them as well. Does that seem sensible? One of my DoSes seemed particularly concerned at the end of term; he could tell I was trying but not getting the results but didn't seem to offer a solution to it other than to keep trying and hope for the best.

    To be perfectly honest I never really looked forward to Cambridge over the summer, just under pressure. I've never been completely comfortable with the idea and having such a bad term kind of hammered it home.

    I also have no idea how to go about going to the GP about something like this. Should I just book an appointment? I want to try to talk to my parents first, of course.

    It's late and I'm staring blankly at Physics work, so I'll end it here and contact my tutor/DoSes tomorrow. If anyone has any more advice, I'm still very interested in hearing it. Thanks again.
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    (Original post by Quizzimodo)
    So basically I'm hoping for some advice. I had a pretty poor first term, and I've pretty stressed over the break as well, so I'm weighing up my options. The tl;dr version is in bold.
    • I don't like the course. I opted for Maths with Physics because I don't particularly like pure maths but equally didn't want to have to do many experiments. It turns out that I have to do a lot of both of those things, and there's no real way of avoiding them both until at least third year - I'd have to do pure in IB Maths and experiments in IB Physics.
    • I'm struggling with the work. Not liking it probably doesn't help, but the pace is too fast and I got behind very quickly. I understand most of lectures (or so I think) but then have no idea what to do on the examples sheets and have to spend even longer sifting through notes to try to get a handle of what's going on.
    • I can't get away from the work, either. There's just too much of it, and whenever I have a break from it, I'm either worrying about not having done enough or I have no energy to do anything else. At home I like to read, I have an interest in programming and quizzes (hence the username) but in college I feel lethargic.
    • I don't like the social side. I'm no party animal, and would rather have a quiet drink at a pub, but everyone else seems to either be focused on work, at some kind of society event, or getting completely bladdered. And of course, nursing a pint is a bit of a time sink, and time is a luxury. I played in the college orchestra, but it felt like a wasted two hours every week, and went to pub quizzes on Sundays, which frankly were the only thing I genuinely enjoyed all term.
    • I don't particularly care about the subject. Everyone else on my course seems to be genuinely interested in maths, can reel off a dozen digits of pi or e. I only have a passing interest in it, and completely balk at the idea of doing research. I have nothing against academia for the sake of itself, but it's just not for me, and I feel that's making my life a lot harder at somewhere like Cambridge where you really do need to want to do the work.
    I feel like if it was only one or two of these then I might be able to muddle through but I don't really think any of it suits me. So, am I alone? Can it get better? I'm seriously considering trying to transfer to my insurance choice, Mathematical Physics at Nottingham. I know it doesn't have the "prestige" but I think a little less pressure and a course I have a chance of enjoying would give me a much better chance.

    Help! Any opinions are appreciated and I will try to answer questions.
    ngl this is really killing my "just got a cambridge offer !!" vibe...
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    Ignore, bitter post.
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    (Original post by Sgany)
    It makes me sick people like you got accepted rather than people who actually wanted to go there.
    I also don't think it's right that I got an offer because I seemed capable rather than actually having passion and drive, but there's no need to be quite so blunt.
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    (Original post by eeeeeh)
    ngl this is really killing my "just got a cambridge offer !!" vibe...
    Me too. I'm starting get terrified!
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    (Original post by Sgany)
    It makes me sick people like you got accepted rather than people who actually wanted to go there.
    LOL Don't be ridiculous. How is someone supposed to know exactly what it's like before actually attending? Going there is vastly different from what most people expect it to be.
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    (Original post by Sgany)
    It makes me sick people like you got accepted rather than people who actually wanted to go there.
    That's not fair. If everyone who wanted really badly to go to Cambridge got in, that would not necessarily give the uni the best candidates - just people desperate to go there. Obviously the poster has the ability to succeed, has given it a long term attempt, weighed it up and knows how they feel - I think perhaps it is the right decision to leave, you're only going to be able to do the university experience once afterall.
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    this is why i think gap years can be very important and should be encouraged

    to me it sounds like you dont have a plan for your future - what you really need is a plan

    1) know what you want to do career wise (do you have any ideas about this?)

    2) find what course leads you there

    3) you will find your more interested if you have goal and aims as well as it being something you enjoy, a degree for the sake of having one is worthless look at it as the basis of your future, you maybe good at maths but would you be happy to do it in one way or another 9-5 for the rest of your life

    if you continue you may waste your loan, if you leave you will also lose half your loan, if your transfer what changes?

    both courses are going to be very similar so i dont believe you will enjoy one more than the other... as mentioned maybe look into other courses such as engineering etc... and see if you can transfer (either at Cambridge or Nottingham)
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    (Original post by RebeccaLydia)
    That's not fair. If everyone who wanted really badly to go to Cambridge got in, that would not necessarily give the uni the best candidates - just people desperate to go there. Obviously the poster has the ability to succeed, has given it a long term attempt, weighed it up and knows how they feel - I think perhaps it is the right decision to leave, you're only going to be able to do the university experience once afterall.
    It kinda is fair, because of the original poster, there is some person in the world, who had to face the rejection and will have to live with it, even though they are truly capable of Cambridge and have an actual passion for their subject.
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    (Original post by Sgany)
    It kinda is fair, because of the original poster, there is some person in the world, who had to face the rejection and will have to live with it, even though they are truly capable of Cambridge and have an actual passion for their subject.
    Hahaha, you are either being absolutely ridiculous... or recently received an Oxbridge rejection. So let me get this straight, everyone attending Cambridge has to be happy, enjoy the course and not be disheartened by working potentially 60 hours a week because there's someone out there, whom tutors deemed not as good an applicant, who could be doing it instead?
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    Hahaha, you are either being absolutely ridiculous... or recently received an Oxbridge rejection. So let me get this straight, everyone attending Cambridge has to be happy, enjoy the course and not be disheartened by working potentially 60 hours a week because there's someone out there, whom tutors deemed not as good an applicant, who could be doing it instead?
    Pretty much, you forget there pretty much "replica" applications who are both rejected and accepted. I am sure Cambridge could have gave an offer to a applicant with the exact same application.
 
 
 
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